US/Mexico Border

An illustrated mural showing Jesus with children on the left, a migrant housing facility in the middle, and the Virgin Mary on the right with a child.
Courtesy of Sarah Cornette

A giant, globe-trotting mural is linking displaced children from two different continents, across vastly different cultures, languages and experiences. “Same Difference: The Mural” is a 36-foot canvas with four different panels spearheaded by art educator Sarah Cornette. Four groups of children, from Chapel Hill; Thessaloniki and Samos, Greece; and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, put paintbrush to canvas and depicted stories from their own experiences of travel and trauma.

a photo of the border wall at Progresso, Texas
Susan Harbage Page

Susan Harbage Page has been a border crosser since childhood. From traveling around Europe with her family in a Volkswagen bus to working in Palestine in the 90s, she has long wondered about the lines that divide us. Why do people on one side enjoy great wealth while those on the other side have less?

Christina Westover / U.S. Army

Thousands of military personnel were deployed to the U.S.-Mexico border in the fall of last year. At the time President Donald Trump said their purpose was to bolster security and help reduce illegal border crossings.

Updated at 4:56 p.m. ET

President Trump used his veto pen for the first time Friday, after Congress tried to reverse his national emergency declaration and rein in spending on a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Congressional critics do not appear to have the votes to override Trump's veto. So, as a practical matter, the administration can continue to spend billions of dollars more on border barriers than lawmakers authorized, unless and until the courts intervene.

Courtesy Peter Eversoll

A group of migrants, mostly from Central America, clashed with U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers on Sunday. Of the thousands of migrants who are seeking asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border, hundreds broke off from the group and attempted to illegally cross into the country. Border protection agents fired tear gas into the crowd, which included children in strollers. 

Felipe de Jesus Molina Mendoza speaking at a protest against the Trump administration’s immigration policies in Raleigh.
Laura Pellicer / WUNC

UPDATE: Immigration officials in Charlotte have delayed the deportation order for Felipe de Jesus Molina Mendoza until a federal appeals court renders a decision on his asylum case. 

Mexican-born Felipe de Jesus Molina Mendoza is asking for asylum in the United States. He says he faces harassment if he is forced to return to Mexico because he is openly gay. Last time he was in Mexico, Molina Mendoza says he and a former boyfriend were attacked with beer bottles because of their sexual orientation.

Sign at the U.S. Border
Makaristos via Creative Commons

President Donald Trump signed an executive order ordering a wall along the 2,000 mile Mexican border.

He claims Mexico will pay for it, but Mexican president Enrique Pena Nieto says otherwise. He canceled his trip to the U.S. where he was scheduled to meet with President Trump.

Host Frank Stasio talks with KJZZ Mexico City senior field correspondent Jorge Valencia about the latest.

Photo of Claudia Ruíz Massieu and North Carolina legislators
Consulado General de Mexico en Raleigh

More than 35 million of the nation’s immigrant population comes from neighboring Mexico.

And America’s relationship with Mexico is at the top of political headlines, particularly when the GOP presidential candidate advocates building a wall along the 2,000 mile border.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Mexico’s Secretary of Foreign Affairs Claudia Ruíz Massieu.

Immigrants’ rights vigil in Marshall Park, Charlotte, May 1, 2006.
Rosario Machicao / La Noticia, Charlotte

Waves of Mexican immigration to the United States date back to the turn of the 20th century. At the start of the Mexican Revolution, groups of Mexicans moved to the U.S. They quickly became an important part of the blue-collar work force. Though some communities welcomed them, others did not.

Border Odyssey

Jun 23, 2015
Image of US/Mexico border
Charles Thompson

The border that separates the United States from Mexico stretches across four states and spans almost 2,000 miles, but the issues that arise from this separation travel an even greater distance. Immigration touches on the economic, social and political fabric of all 50 states.