UNC-Chapel Hill

Long Story Shorts

Nov 14, 2012

For many aspiring playwrights, seeing your production come together piece by piece on stage is a faraway fantasy. But for the young students of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s undergraduate Writing for the Screen and Stage Program, this very fantasy will become a reality. Long Story Shorts is a festival of one act plays written by six undergraduate playwrights, and directed and performed by professional local actors.

In 2008, it would have been difficult to go to a college campus in the United States and forget we had an election coming up. The young people brought out about 22 million votes to the election then, but will it happen again? Are people still fired up and ready to go on America’s campuses? And how connected to politics are today’s college students anyway?

First Lady Michelle Obama
Alletta Cooper

Michelle Obama made a campaign stop in Chapel Hill before joining her husband at last night’s presidential debate.  Even though President Obama’s approval numbers have fluctuated over the year – Mrs. Obama’s popularity has remained strong during the tight re-election campaign.  And yesterday’s rally is part of an effort to fire up volunteers to get voters to the polls early. 

One would think the Obama’s had a second home in North Carolina going by all the visits the First Lady has made in recent months.  People love Michelle Obama and her signature BIG hugs.

Bill Manbo’s family was just one of many forcibly relocated into Japanese internment camps during World War II. He recorded his time there on a 35 millimeter camera and eventually passed the photos along to Eric Muller, a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

An advocacy group says it plans to file a lawsuit against the UNC system, alleging inconsistent and unfair treatment of veterans. Jason Thigpen is president of Student Veterans Advocacy Group.

"The UNC school system across the board - universities and community colleges - have invariably misclassified many of these student veterans and family members as out-of-state residents, when they meet all the qualifications to be considered an in-state resident for tuition purposes," said Thigpen.

The origins of the universe are being uncovered in Chapel Hill, NC thanks to Laura Mersini-Houghton, a cosmologist and theoretical physicist at the University of North Carolina. Her work delves even deeper into how our world came to be than the Big Bang theory.

Several hundred students, faculty members and alums held a rally today at UNC-Chapel Hill in an effort to get the university's chancellor, Holden Thorp, to reconsider his decision to step down. Thorp has offered to resign in the wake of a series of athletic-related scandals at the university. Seniors Maggie Sommers and Lauren Delaunay say they attended the rally to show their respect for Thorp.

Maggie Sommers and Lauren Delaunay:

Holden Thorp
UNC-Chapel Hill

The resolution came out of a closed-door meeting of the Trustees last night. It describes the Board’s “unanimous” support for Thorp and “emphatically” requests that he reconsider his decision to resign.

Thorp announced that resignation on Monday, saying he believed it was in the best interests of the university and his family. Thorp was on the teleconference with the Trustees and has not indicated whether he will reconsider.

Holden Thorp
UNC-Chapel Hill

The resignation of UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Holden Thorp is drawing a variety of reactions from those on-campus and off. Thorp has been at the helm for four years. During the last two, he faced growing criticism for how he has handled a series of scandals in the football program and the African and Afro-American studies department. And then last week, the school’s top fundraiser abruptly resigned after being confronted with a number of personal trips he took at university expense.

Holden Thorp
UNC-Chapel Hill

Holden Thorp has resigned as the chancellor at UNC-Chapel Hill. His four-year tenure was marked by historic budget cuts and significant accomplishments in research and student achievement. But it will likely be the three scandals that occurred on his watch that will be most prominent in his legacy.

They involved academic integrity issues in the football program and the African-American studies department. And just last week, Thorp accepted the resignation of the school’s top fundraiser for using university funds for personal travel.

Holden Thorp
UNC-Chapel Hill

Holden Thorp is stepping down as chancellor at UNC-Chapel Hill. Thorp said in a statement released earlier today that the decision "wasn't easy" but that he was resigning in the best interests of the university. Thorp resigns after a tumultuous last four years. Thorp has led the University through scandals in the football program, African-American studies department, and in fundraising.  His last official day will be June 30th, 2013.

The UNC Board of Governors voted today to change the way new tuition revenue can be allocated to need-based financial aid. The new rules allow individual campuses to determine what percentage of tuition revenue can be used to help low-income students. The old policy said 25 % of new tuition revenue had to be set aside for financial aid. The Board also fielded a lot of questions on the future of UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Holden Thorp. Thorp has dealt with scandals involving football, the department of Afro and African-American studies, and the school's top fundraiser.

Holden Thorp
UNC-Chapel Hill

This week, UNC-Chapel Hill was rocked by yet another scandal – this one involving the travel of two of the school’s top fundraisers. It follows high-profile incidents in the football program and the Afro and African-American Studies department.

That has led some to question the leadership of the school’s chancellor. In a conversation earlier today, Chancellor Holden Thorp talked with WUNC reporter Dave DeWitt. Thorp first addressed the school’s short-term fundraising prospects after the resignation of Vice Chancellor Matt Kupec.

The economic downturn hit North Carolina harder than much of the country, and it will take the state longer to recover. That's the conclusion of a new report from UNC's Global Research Institute.

“Hate” is one of those words that gets thrown around recklessly in everyday conversation, but sometimes when we say it, we mean it. What is hatred and why do we feel it? Is it an emotion unique to humans? And why does hatred often lead to violence?

Researchers at UNC-Chapel Hill have published a paper on the importance of diversity in higher education.

Dave DeWitt: The paper, published in the current issue of Rutgers Race and Law Review, surveyed 6,500 law students over ten years, on 50 different campuses. The results were clear: students reported a distinct benefit in their learning environments when students of diverse backgrounds were present.

UNC-Chapel Hill researchers are working to make it easier for hydrologists to share data on problems facing the world's water supply. The project is being funded by the National Science Foundation. Ray Idaszak works for the Renaissance Computing Institute at the university. He says his team is working to create the high-tech infrastructure to allow scientists to see and comment on each other's work.

Students are moving back into Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill as classes are starting at Triangle Universities.

Dave DeWitt: Heavy rain over the weekend didn't make things easier for the tens of thousands of college students and parents lugging boxes up flights of stairs. Several schools were forced to cancel some outdoor activities over the weekend designed to welcome students to campus.

Just a year after an NCAA investigation into improper academic and financial benefits for members of the University of North Carolina’s football team, the school is under suspicion of academic fraud again. The first scandal resulted in the firing of Coach Butch Davis and the accelerated retirement of Athletic Director Dick Baddour. The latest probe involves student athletes and UNC’s Afro-American Studies program. WUNC Education Reporter Dave DeWitt joins host Frank Stasio for a look at the latest trouble brewing for UNC athletics.

A former governor will lead an investigation into academic irregularities at UNC Chapel Hill.

N.C. Central is getting ready to search for a new permanent replacement for Chancellor Charlie Nelms, who abruptly announced his retirement late last week.

Dave DeWitt: When James Moeser announced he was stepping down as UNC-Chapel Hill's chancellor in 2007, he did so eight full months before he officially left the job. Chancellors at other UNC system schools typically give at least several months' notice, even if they are leaving for other positions.

UNC Working to Save Native Species in Galapagos

Jul 25, 2012
Galapagos
The UNC Center for Galapagos Studies

The Galapagos is a chain of 13 large islands about six hundred miles from the coast of Ecuador. It was there, in 1835, that the British scientist Charles Darwin began thinking about how animals change over time. Since then, scientists have called the Galapagos a living laboratory,  a place to study evolution and natural selection. Now, with 180,000 tourists visiting each year, experts say the living lab is in danger, and University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill scientists are stepping up to help.

Researchers at UNC-Chapel Hill are helping communities develop better plans for dealing with floods. The result could be lower flood insurance rates for homeowners.

Dave DeWitt: Flood insurance is a major consideration for many in eastern North Carolina, where some entire counties lie in the floodplain. Since private insurers won’t offer policies, homeowners get flood insurance through National Flood Insurance Program, run by FEMA.

Viva Cackalacky!

Jul 20, 2012

UNC-CH professor David Garcia tried something a little different last year for one of his classes. It was called "Musical Movements: Migration, Exile, and Diaspora," and instead of a lecture, it was hands-on. The students produced a compilation CD of Latin music from around North Carolina.

Viva Cackalacky!

Jul 20, 2012

UNC-CH professor David Garcia tried something a little different last year for one of his classes. It was called "Musical Movements: Migration, Exile, and Diaspora," and instead of a lecture, it was hands-on. The students produced a compilation CD of Latin music from around North Carolina.

Lawyers representing several media outlets and UNC-Chapel Hill argued today over what constitutes a public document. At the center of the case are the personal cell phone records of former football coach Butch Davis. Dave DeWitt reports.

Dave DeWitt: The media outlets contend that Davis was acting as a public official when he conducted the business of managing the UNC-Chapel Hill football program over his personal cell phone. Their attorneys argued today that that means those records should be public.

A former professor at UNC-Chapel Hill has resigned from the University of Michigan amid allegations he fabricated research while in Chapel Hill.

Dave DeWitt: Lawrence Sanna is a social psychologist. In 2011, he published several papers that showed people who stood in an elevated position were more altruistic. One of his experiments showed that people who rode to the top of an escalator were more likely to give to the Salvation Army than those who rode the escalator to the bottom.

Entrepreneurs, researchers, and the military are gathering in Chapel Hill today to discuss high-tech solutions to military problems.  The Federal Advanced Technologies Symposium is being hosted at UNC by Senator Richard Burr and the North Carolina Military Business Center, which works to secure military contracts in the state.

UNC Receives Digital Humanities Grant

Jul 6, 2012

The University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill has received a nearly 1.4-million-dollar grant to expand digital humanities research.

Asma Khalid: If you're like me, you might be wondering what exactly is digital humanities research.

Well, once upon a time, academics researched without computers, they physically had to go to an archive. These days, there's a hyper-abundance of information online.

Robert Allen: Huge quantities of data, more data than any one scholar can possibly go through in a lifetime

Social Stability Can Combat Violence In Veterans

Jun 26, 2012

A new survey led by a University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill professor counters some of the myths about what makes veterans violent.

Asma Khalid: Eric Elbogen is a professor at UNC and the lead researcher on this study. He says too often post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, is used as the stock explanation for veteran violence.

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