SOT Live Music

Image of Mount Moriah
Lissa Gotwals

North Carolina-based band Mount Moriah has been together for almost a decade.

Their latest record 'How to Dance,' marks a turning point, as they focus less on personal identity and more on looking outward to examine how mythical and spiritual experiences have shaped their direction.

They recorded this album in home studios with the help of long-time collaborators and friends who have supported them along the way. 

Flamenco originated in the 18th century in the Andalusia region of Spain and has grown since.
Angelica Escoto

Flamenco is an art form with a relatively unknown history. It was first documented in literature in the mid-1700s as a passionate, rhythmic, and rich tradition with firm roots in Andalusia, Spain.

The group Flamenco Vivo Carlota Santana embodies this tradition and has been working to bring the spirit of flamenco to American audiences for more than three decades.

Charles Latham uses music to look at stability through employment and his own struggles in life.
Pat McGuire

Musician Charles Latham has seen many friends and family struggle in the current economic situation. Friends lost jobs and his parents lost their house in the housing crisis.

Latham combined these experiences with his own struggle making ends meet out of low-paying jobs to create music about the importance of the living wage. Finding stability through employment is a theme throughout Latham's music, as well as a goal he hopes his local community can achieve.

Mallarmé HIP ensemble
Marc Banka Photography

The biennial North Carolina HIP (Historically Informed Performance) Music Festival hosted by Mallarmé Chamber Players is back this year with expanded programming. The festival features Baroque music played on period string instruments, which tend to sound richer, mellower and less edgy than modern counterparts.

The Mallarmé Chamber Players will play a two-part concert called the Biber Bowl featuring the Rosary Sonatas, 16 movements interpreting events from the lives of Jesus and Mary.

Zoe Pictures

Professor Toon, a.k.a. Kurrell Rice, is ready to tell his story through rap.

Growing up in Baltimore, Toon and his family experienced domestic abuse for years at the hands of his stepfather. The family eventually fled to North Carolina. The experiences shaped how Toon approaches his own role as a father.

In his new album, "Take Notes," Toon explores his growth as a rapper, son and father. 

Building A Guitar From Scratch

Jan 12, 2016
Alex Edney (L) and Terry Fritz (R) discussing the bracing on the sides of a guitar.
Fritz and Edney Guitars

Terry Fritz had two loves for most of his life: playing guitar and woodworking. During a job change in 2006, a friend suggested he marry those two passions as a luthier. Fritz quickly fell in love with the process – the properties of wood necessary for a good guitar, how to fasten the neck, the geometry that shapes the timbre of an acoustic guitar, etc.

Tokyo Rosenthal (middle) poses with Roger Maris (left) and Mickey Mantle.
Tokyo Rosenthal

As Tokyo Rosenthal has grown older, he has had more and more conversations about death and dying. He’s also watched close friends and family members fall ill. All of this inspired his latest album “Afterlife”—a meditation on end-of-life issues released last September.

(L-R) Gabe Fox-Peck, Annie Bennett and Philip Norris. 'Lady and the Tramps' after winning the 2014 NCCU Jazz competition.
Lady and the Tramps

    

The jazz scene in the Triangle has been steadily gaining ground in the past few decades. The region’s musical talents include Grammy-nominated acts like Branford Marsalis and Nnenna Freelon as well as budding young musicians who are hoping to become the next generation of jazz stars.

Alexandrea Lassiter

Mint Julep Jazz Band transports its audience back to jazz clubs of the ‘20s, ‘30s and early ‘40s. The bang gets inspiration and musical creativity from the toe tapping and head nodding of swing dance, something inextricably linked to the jazz of this time period.

Earlier this year, Mint Julep Jazz Band released its second album, “Battle Axe,” an amalgam of original pieces inspired by that era as well as modern arrangements of old songs.

Picture of the cast from 'Beautiful Star'
Triad Stage

The holiday season brings with it many revered holiday performances like "The Nutcracker" and "A Christmas Carol." These stories are cherished and familiar.

"Beautiful Star: An Appalachian Nativity" retells the well-known Christmas story through a humorous and intimate Appalachian lens. The performance returns to the Triad Stage in celebration of the venue's 15th anniversary. 

Duke Medicine Orchestra is comprised of nearly 90 musicians who are all involved in the Duke University Health System in some fashion.
Eric Monson

The Duke Medicine Orchestra (DMO) serves as an intersection of science and art. Since its inception in 2010, the ensemble has grown from 35 members to nearly 90 musicians. The orchestra is comprised of doctors, students and others affiliated with the Duke University Health System.

BJ Leiderman composed the theme songs of several popular NPR shows.
Cole and Rian Photography

Note: This is a rebroadcast from earlier this year.

You might not know BJ Leiderman, but there is a good chance you have heard his music.

On The Road With Lowland Hum

Nov 20, 2015
Lowland Hum is an indie folk band comprised of married duo Daniel and Lauren Goans.
Griffin Hart Davis

Lowland Hum spent the majority of last year touring on the road, but by the end, the married indie folk duo or Daniel and Lauren Goans couldn't wait to get home and start writing again. They described moments of isolation and moments of beauty from the sights around the United States.

The Greensboro natives released their second full-length album, Lowland Hum, in the spring. They returned to the road with a new perspective this summer. 

Marcus Anderson, Blending Music And Coffee

Nov 13, 2015
Marcus Anderson combines his passions of music and coffee in his new venture, 'AND Coffee,' an album and coffee line with four flavors.
JAG Entertainment

Marcus Anderson plays the saxophone, and while his work is rooted in jazz, he incorporates other musical influences, especially pop.

For the past three years, Anderson has been working with one of the world’s biggest pop artists: Prince. Anderson plays saxophone in The New Power Generation, the backing band for Prince.

The von Trapps
Ben Moon

Sofia, Melanie, Amanda and August von Trapp are descendants of the family made famous by the beloved musical, "The Sound of Music."

Their grandfather, Werner von Trapp, taught them Austrian folk songs as children, and it was during their childhood that they realized their voices blended perfectly in classical choral music. Today, with their legacy in mind, The von Trapps have created their own version of folk music with a touch of indie rock.

Jeanne Jolly is out with her second album, 'A Place To Run.'
Bruce Deboer

A lot has changed in the last three years for musician Jeanne Jolly. She finished a national tour of the album “Angels," got married, got a dog, and completed the new album, “A Place To Run.”

The new collection has a grittier country rock feel and looks at what it means to have ‘places to run.’ Jolly explores where people turn for refuge or why people run away to escape grief.

The Music of Matt Phillips

Oct 30, 2015
Matt phillips
Adrian Gilliam

Note: This is a rebroadcast from earlier this year.

Singer-songwriter Matt Phillips has been involved with many musical groups in his life, from the North Carolina Boy's Choir to a high school band to his church band.

The married couple, Pete and Andrea Connolly, comprise Birds and Arrows.
Bill Hudson

Before Birds and Arrows moves out of North Carolina in December, the rock duo will release “Edge of Everything,” its fifth album in the state and seventh overall.

Andrea and Pete Connolly are headed west to Tucson, Arizona, a city both fell in love with while on tour last year. Andrea plays guitar, while Pete plays cajon.

An image of Jack the Radio
Story Photographers

Jack the Radio’s new album Badlands stretches outside the Raleigh band’s Americana comfort zone. The album's musical recipe is one half blues-rock and the other half experimental synthesizers.

Host Frank Stasio talks with the band about it’s new “cosmic country” album and marketing music in the modern age. Jack the Radio is: George Hage on acoustic guitar and vocals, A.C. Hill on acoustic guitar and vocals, Chris Sayles on hand percussion and vocals, and Danny Johnson on dobro and vocals.

Heartwood is a Greenville country rock band playing three sold out shows at Cat's Cradle in Carrboro as a reunion series 40 years after they disbanded.
Nick Reitz

Back in the early 1970s, the country rock band Heartwood was on a roll. The group started in a small town outside Greenville, North Carolina and climbed the ladder from jam sessions and club concerts to a national record label.

They toured the country with bands like The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and Bachman-Turner Overdrive. But road weariness caused the band to break up.  Now, 40 years later, they are back together for a three-night reunion.

Becky Buller won three IBMA awards this year for emerging artist, songwriter of the year and recorded event of the year.
Becky Buller

Becky Buller has tried her hand at almost every part of the bluegrass music industry.

She is a prolific songwriter whose compositions have been recorded by musicians like Ricky Skaggs; she produced for and toured with Valerie Smith; she co-hosts a bluegrass music show; and she has released two solo records.

Balsam Range won 'Song of the Year' and 'Vocal Group of the Year' at this year's IBMA awards.
Courtest of Laughing Penguin Publicity

Balsam Range is a bluegrass band with the accolades to show for it.

The Haywood County quintet won two awards at this year’s IBMA awards: "Song of the Year" and "Vocal Group of the Year." The group was nominated for six IBMA Awards this year. The band’s fifth studio album, Five, combines traditional bluegrass and gospel with songs about home and hard times.

The Steel Wheels are an Americana roots band from Virginia featuring (L-R) Brian Dickel on bass, Trent Wagler on guitar and banjo, Eric Brubaker on fiddle and Jay Lapp on mandolin.
RubySky Photography

The Steel Wheels are an Americana roots band from Virginia taking influences from old-time and traditional string band music. Though they might look and sound like a bluegrass band to the average listener, The Steel Wheels do not consider themselves to be a bluegrass group.  Nonetheless they are bringing their music to the International Bluegrass Music Association’s festival in Raleigh for the second time.

Giorgio Ciompi (right) founded the Ciompi Quartet at Duke University in 1965. Pictured with him are (L-R) Claudia Warburg, one of the early quartet members, pianist Murray Perahia and Horst Meyer, a professor at Duke and a great patron of the quartet.
Ciompi Quartet

The Ciompi Quartet was founded at Duke University by renowned Italian violinist Giorgio Ciompi. Since its inception in 1965, the quartet has been an integral part of the classical music scene in the Triangle and has also built a reputation around the world.

The quartet begins its anniversary season with a performance at Baldwin Auditorium next Saturday, October 3. The event features celebrated jazz vocalist Nneena Freelon. 

Neil Cribbs is a blues and Americana guitarist based in Raleigh
Staton Carter Photography

Neil Cribbs has had a full tour of North Carolina scenery in his life. He grew up in Wilmington and attended college at Appalachian State University.

He spent a few years working outside the state after college but returned home and now lives in Raleigh. Cribbs is a guitarist and singer with many musical influences including folk, blues and Americana.

President Richard Nixon greeting Robert and his late wife Sallie Brown in the White House
Robert Brown

In the 1960s, High Point resident Robert Brown worked closely with Martin Luther King Jr. as a fundraiser. Brown has also advised several prominent American politicians, including Senators John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy, and Presidents Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan.

Rhiannon Giddens
Michael Weintrob

For as long as she can remember, Rhiannon Giddens has been singing. Growing up in Greensboro, she sang in youth choirs, despite not knowing how to read music. But that was okay, because Giddens said she received the best kind of teaching as a child.

An image of musician Phil Cook
Middle West Management

 

Wisconsin native Phil Cook headed south for a new home in North Carolina 10 years ago.  Since then, he has been in a band with Justin Vernon from Bon Iver, formed Megafaun with his brother Brad Cook and drummer Joe Westerlund, and has played on or produced records by everybody from Amy Ray of the Indigo Girls to Hiss Golden Messenger.

Along the way, Phil got married, had a son and settled himself deep in North Carolina's red clay.  Now he's releasing his first solo record called Southland Mission.  Fans of Megafaun will find Cook’s new music to be groovier with a more rootsy vibe than some of that band's work, but there are hints of the past in some of the vocal harmonies and instrumentation. On the whole, the album reflects a passion for southern music that’s been growing in Cook for decades.

"I had the title of the record before I had the songs written. I liked the idea that a title for a record is a theme for your life, a theme for your music, and seems to be the title of the chapter for wherever you’re at," Cook said. "To me, Southland Mission seemed like a great way to sum up being in the South for 10 years now, and longed to be in the South 10 years before that. I had built up quite a mission in my mind about, 'What was I coming down here for?' Well, it was the music."

Dale Watson
Sarah Wilson

Guitarist Dale Watson feels out of place in the modern country music world, and he is perfectly OK with that. The Texas musician believes the genre has changed so much that it lost its identity, so he created a new genre of his own—Ameripolitan.

Ameripolitan music is original music with prominent roots influence, and the genre’s tagline is, "We’re not about leaving country music behind, we’re taking the ‘real’ country music with us."

Southern Culture on the Skids
Ron Keith

Southern Culture on the Skids (SCOTS) formed in Chapel Hill more than 30 years ago. Since then, they have traveled the globe with their brand of southern rock.

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