Section 287(g)

photo of Marty Rosenbluth standing in front of a water tower
Marty Rosenbluth

 At 47, Marty Rosenbluth decided to go back to school. After 20 years working on international social justice issues, he thought that a law degree could help him get higher-level jobs with organizations he admired, like Amnesty International and Greenpeace.

a photo of Smiley's Farmer's Market empty.
Cass Herrington

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested more than 200 people around North Carolina in early February. And according to new reporting, this action had a noticeable impact on local commerce in western North Carolina. 

Prison Bars
Michael Coghlan / Flickr Creative Commons

The Alamance County Board of Commissioners approved a $2.8 million budget for staffing, raises and equipment upgrades, so that the county jail could resume detaining federal immigration inmates.

NC Sheriffs, Sheriffs, Law Enforcement
Paula Dance for Pitt County Sheriff

North Carolina now has 20 African-American sheriffs across its 100 counties. The state sheriff’s association says it does not keep numbers on race, but it is believed to be the largest number of black sheriffs at one time ever for the state. And several of the new black sheriffs won in big upset victories during the midterm election.

Laura Garduño Garcia and Milton Marin wait with students who are taking their concerns to the county commissioners.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

It’s a Sunday afternoon at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in Burlington, and schoolchildren and their families gather in a church meeting room to craft hand-made greeting cards. Little girls in their Sunday dresses, dark hair pulled back in ribbons, write messages in crayon on red paper. Organizer Laura Garduño Garcia looks over a stack of finished cards written to the Alamance County commissioners.

Section 287(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act allows United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement to partner with state and local police. Those officers are allowed to enforce federal immigration law. Critics say that the program leads to racial profiling of minorities and makes immigrants fearful of reporting crime in their own communities.