School Shooting

Blue Cottage Agency

20 years ago, two students at Columbine High School in Colorado killed 12 of their classmates and one teacher in what was the deadliest school massacre in the nation’s history at the time.

Cary-resident Kacey Ruesgegger Johnson was a junior at the time and was sitting in the library reading a gossip magazine when gunfire erupted. The events that followed led to lifelong physical and mental scars and a declaration that she would never go into a library again.

Sandy Hook Promise

At the start of the next school year, North Carolina middle and high school students will have a new tool to report threats to school safety. State Superintendent Mark Johnson introduced the “Say Something Anonymous Reporting System” at a press conference Thursday.

photo of an entrance at UNC Charlotte
UNC Charlotte/Stake Your Claim

Expressions of shock and grief continue today after a shooting last night on the campus of the University of North Carolina Charlotte. Two people were killed, and four others were injured.  

 

crime scene tape
Ian Britton / Flickr/Creative Commons

Updated 1:50 p.m.

A North Carolina high school student shot and killed a fellow student during a fight in a crowded school hallway Monday, officials said, prompting a lockdown and generating an atmosphere of chaos and fear as dozens of parents rushed to the school to make sure their children were safe.

Zainab Antepli, a junior at Chapel Hill High School, calls for tougher gun laws in front of a large crowd at Pullen Memorial Baptist Church in Raleigh.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Since the mass school shooting in Columbine, America has seemed almost powerless against rogue gunmen attacking defenseless suburban schools. After the tragic killings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012, many declared that if America did not make changes after Newtown it never would. 

Students at East Chapel Hill High walk out of their class on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 as part of a nationwide call for tighter gun control measures.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Updated at 4:27 p.m.

Students hoisted "Stand United" signs. They chanted "''Hey, hey, ho, ho - the NRA has got to go" outside the White House. Others read the names of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High victims aloud in a somber tribute.

Annette Elizabeth Allen
For NPR

The Senate Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing on school safety following the mass shooting at Florida's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

The committee is hearing from a Stoneman Douglas teacher as well as from the father of one of the shooting victims, Florida lawmakers and Justice Department officials. Watch the hearing live starting at 9:30 a.m.

Classroom
WUNC File Photo

High school students across the state have been staging or planning walkouts to protest gun violence after the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., but some worry that colleges and universities will not admit them if they are suspended for doing so.

boy holds gun control sign
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

 

Thousands marched in Raleigh Wednesday night to remember the people killed in the school shooting in Parkland, Florida. Students took center stage as they called for North Carolina elected officials to toughen gun restrictions.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

There was another mass shooting in the United States this week. That means another round of emotional reactions, social media sparring and carefully delivered messages by elected officials. If recent shootings serve as any example, it's also likely that no legislative action will follow.

M&P .45
Daniel Weber's photo stream / Creative Commons Attribution (2.0) image from Daniel Weber’s photostream

A state legislative committee that oversees emergency management heard an update Thursday on school safety measures. The committee's chair opened the meeting with a reflection on recent school shootings in other states.

Aerial view of Wayne Community College campus
North Carolina Association of Community College Trustees

Updated Friday, April 17, 1:46 p.m.

Wayne Community College in Goldsboro has closed for the weekend. The college website says it closed at 10 a.m. Friday morning after receiving "several threatening phone calls over the last two days."

College authorities say the campus was not in danger today and acted "purely from a precautionary perspective."