Racial Equity

Wayne Lawrence / ProPublica

For generations, black landowners in the South relied on informal agreements, instead of wills, to keep property in the family. In a new article from investigative news outlet ProPublica, reporter Lizzie Presser investigated the story of a Carteret County family’s land loss and how African Americans across the country lost about 90% of their farmland between 1910 and 1997. Host Anita Rao talks with Lizzie Presser about the political, economic and emotional cost of black landholders losing their family property.

A map showing orange areas on the outskirts of Asheville, Charlotte, Winston-Salem, Durham, Raleigh, Fayetteville, Jaskconville and Wilmington.
Courtesy of Grady McCallie/North Carolina Conservation Network

North Carolina Conservation Network just released its first-ever “State of the Environment” report. It includes data analysis, polling and more than 100 indicators that measure the overall well-being of the environment and the people of North Carolina.

Illustration of students of different races raising hands, good for education stories on diversity and segregation.
John LeMasney / Flickr Creative Commons

Race plays a significant factor in almost every aspect of community life. But often, there’s a fundamental misunderstanding of how those conversations should be happening.

Now, a Greensboro-based organization is teaching people how to talk about race openly.

Don Harder / Flickr/ www.flickr.com/photos/dharder9475/5396413821

In 2018, Durham mother Fatimah Salleh repeatedly listened to her son complain about his experience during in-school suspension, or ISS. The program is much like detention: Students spend the day in a classroom, and they are instructed to plug away quietly at school work. Curious about her son’s experience, Salleh decided to accompany him for a day to see for herself what ISS looked like at Durham School of the Arts

Courtesy of Dr. Kimberly Johnson

Even though she grew up in a small, historically black community in Mississippi, Kimberly Johnson heard plenty of conversations about racism and discrimination.

photo of Erin Byrd
Courtesy of Erin Byrd

Activist Erin Byrd grew up moving from one military base to the next – from Virginia to Texas to South Korea to Texas to Germany and back to the U.S. again. Throughout her childhood, Byrd witnessed military families get free dental care, free health care and reduced-price groceries. The government supplied these basic services to the military population, and she wondered why the whole country did not have the same benefits.

Minorities continue to find it more difficult than whites to qualify for loans.
Elise Amendola / AP

Half a century ago, the federal Fair Housing Act banned racial discrimination in lending. But today, African Americans and Latinos continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgage loans at rates sometimes far higher than their white neighbors.

Photo of Carlton-LaNey teaching a class
Courtesy of Iris Carlton-LaNey

Iris Carlton-LaNey is often impressed by the resourcefulness and strength of those living in poor, underserved and rural communities. As a social worker, she has spent a career observing how many in those communities have a strong commitment to hard work, family and religion. And those are values she recognizes from her own upbringing on a tobacco farm in southeastern North Carolina, where education was valued above all. 

Photo of Broderick presenting to a room of people, 'racial equity training' is projected onto wall
CJ Broderick, ABC Strategy & Consulting

More than two-thirds of company executives rate diversity and inclusion as an important issue, according to a 2017 survey by  Deloitte. With an increase in interest for diversity and inclusion comes an increase in demand for racial equity and diversity workshops.