political gerrymandering

Official photo of Congressman Mark Walker
United States Congress

  U.S. Rep. Mark Walker announced late Monday he won’t run for anything in 2020 — making him the second North Carolina Republican congressman standing aside because of recent redistricting.

Portrait of George Holding
Courtesy of George Holding

North Carolina's newly redrawn congressional map has convinced at least one Republican incumbent not to run for reelection next year. U.S. Rep. George Holding issued a statement today acknowledging that changes to the 2nd Congressional District factored into his decision not to seek another term in 2020.

Rusty Jacobs, WUNC

A state court has given the green light to open candidate filing for North Carolina's 2020 congressional elections. The judicial panel ruled Monday that the importance of holding the state's March 3 congressional primaries on time was more pressing than the need to resolve lingering legal questions about North Carolina's new congressional map.

In this July 26, 2017 photo, a member of the gallery tries to display her sign while lawmakers convene during a joint select committee meeting on redistricting in Raleigh, N.C.
Gerry Broome / AP

Updated at 4:26 p.m.

North Carolina judges ordered a new U.S. House district map that Republican state legislators drew last month be used in the 2020 elections, deciding on Monday there wasn't the time to scrutinize the boundaries for extreme partisan bias.

Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

In a time-crunched, court-ordered process, the North Carolina General Assembly recently redrew the state's legislative district maps to be used in next year's elections. A Wake County Superior Court had found the Republican-controlled legislature had gerrymandered dozens of House and Senate districts for extreme partisan advantage. The redrawn maps are now under court review.

Map outlining North Carolina's House districts.
Courtesy of the North Carolina State Board of Elections

On Tuesday, a three-judge panel in Raleigh ruled that North Carolina's legislative maps are unconstitutional partisan gerrymanders that favor Republicans. The court ordered state legislators to draw up new maps within two weeks, ahead of the primaries for the 2020 election. Republican Senate leader Phil Berger announced that he will not appeal the decision, despite many earlier pledges to do so from Republican lawmakers and staff.

Activists at the Supreme Court opposed to partisan gerrymandering hold up representations of congressional districts from North Carolina, left, and Maryland, right.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

A North Carolina judicial panel on Tuesday rejected state legislative district maps, saying legislators took extreme advantage from drawing voting districts to help elect a maximum number of Republican lawmakers. The judges gave lawmakers two weeks to try again.

United States Supreme Court
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

The Supreme Court's conservative majority seemed wary Tuesday of getting federal judges involved in determining when electoral district maps are too partisan.

The gerrymandered North Carolina Congressional district map
North Carolina General Assembly

The Supreme Court is returning to arguments over whether the political task of redistricting can be overly partisan.

The United States Supreme Court. Justices will hear arguments in a political gerrymandering case on Tuesday.
AP

Last year, proponents of limiting partisan politics in the creation of electoral districts needed to win over Justice Anthony Kennedy. They couldn't.

Laurel Street
Allen G. Breed / AP Photo

Democrats won more votes, regained control of the U.S. House and flipped hundreds of seats in state legislatures during the 2018 elections. It was, by most accounts, a good year for the party.

Yet it wasn't as bad as it could have been for Republicans.

That's because they may have benefited from a built-in advantage in some states, based on how political districts were drawn, that prevented deeper losses or helped them hold on to power, according to a mathematical analysis by The Associated Press.

The gerrymandered North Carolina Congressional district map
North Carolina General Assembly

Yet another redistricting lawsuit has been filed in North Carolina, this one challenging General Assembly boundaries that Democrats and election reform advocates say remain illegally tainted by excessive favoritism toward Republicans.

Gerrymandered districts have given Republicans an edge in recent years
CQ Press / UNC-Chapel Hill

A federal court has again found North Carolina’s congressional district map to be unconstitutional, ruling that it was drawn to favor Republicans. The panel was reconsidering the case at the direction of the Supreme Court, which declined to hear it earlier this year. With November’s midterm elections quickly approaching, the court must now decide whether to demand new maps be drawn and who should draw them. 

Flickr Creative Commons/Stephen Melkisethian

By their own admission Republican lawmakers have purposefully drawn the state’s election maps in favor of their own party, sending 10 Republicans and just three Democrats to the U.S. House of Representatives.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

The House has approved a stopgap measure to fund the government through mid-February, but Senate Democrats seem dissatisfied. They want concessions including deportation protection for some young immigrants before giving their vote.

NC Legislature
W Edward Callis III

Federal judges ruled yesterday that the state's congressional districts drawn by Republican lawmakers are too partisan. They described them as  drawn to “entrench Republican domination of the state’s congressional delegation.” This ruling marks the first time a federal court has struck down a congressional map on those grounds. 

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

 

This week the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments about a case from Wisconsin regarding the constitutionality of political gerrymandering.