Police Reform

Image of Asheville police car
Osajus / Flickr Creative Commons

Thirty-one police officers in the western North Carolina city of Asheville have resigned from the force since June.

Raleigh Police Cruiser
PDpolicecars, via Flickr / https://bit.ly/2Q7UmMD

Raleigh Police are creating a new unit that would send both officers and social workers to certain calls.

Police Lights
Keith Kern, Creative Commons / https://bit.ly/2CFeh2a

An employee at a North Carolina police department has been placed on administrative leave following a social media post about George Floyd, officials said Thursday.

Market House Fayetteville
City of Fayetteville, Andrew Johnson / https://bit.ly/3fzhb7j

Protesters have deconstructed a camp that stood in front of the Market House in Fayetteville for nearly a week.

But they've vowed to return if the city council does not meet their demands for police reform.

Graham Protests
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

Activists in Alamance County are calling for policy overhauls to prevent police brutality, especially against Black people. And another group of protesters want a Confederate monument removed from downtown Graham, the county seat.

Fayetteville City Council
City of Fayetteville, North Carolina

Who polices the police? Protesters rising up against George Floyd’s death and police violence have raised this question, including in Fayetteville. The Fayetteville City Council voted in support of establishing a citizens advisory board for issues of police misconduct at a special meeting Monday night. 

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

President Trump signed an executive order on Tuesday encouraging police departments to improve training — a step critics say falls short of what is needed to curb police officers' use of force against nonwhites.

The order comes as the president faces tremendous pressure to take action following the killing of George Floyd at the hands of police last month.

Hundreds of protesters took to downtown Raleigh on Saturday, May. 30, 2020 to denounce the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis earlier in the week.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

After more than two weeks of protests in downtown Raleigh, protesters are demanding change from the city's leadership, particularly in its police department.

Naomi Prioleau / WUNC

A group of faith leaders in Greensboro, known as the Pulpit Forum, has demands for its city amid protests against police brutality.

The North Carolina House of Representatives' meeting room
North Carolina General Assembly

Cities around the country are facing pressure to reform their policing and take a hard look at systemic racism. Minneapolis announced the intent to defund portions of their police department. Other cities have ended relationships between school systems and the police. 

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper sits for an interview with WUNC in the Executive Mansion in Raleigh, N.C., Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. Cooper addressed the opiod crisis affecting the state.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Calling George Floyd's death a "defining moment" for justice reform, North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper announced the creation of a panel on Tuesday to recommend ways to reform police, prosecutor and judicial conduct with an eye toward ending racial disparities.

A crowd gathers in downtown Raleigh on Tuesday night to protest the death of George Floyd and violence against black Americans.
Kate Medley / For WUNC

Daily protests over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis have spread across North Carolina. While the message of these demonstrations is slightly different in each city, there has been a broad call for overhauling the way police officers do their jobs.

Mugshot of Chauvin.
Courtesy of Ramsey County Sheriff's Office via AP

On Memorial Day, former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin put his knee on George Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes, leaving it there after Floyd lost consciousness and became unresponsive.