Nuclear Weapons

Image of a nuclear bomb test explosion in the Pacific in 1958.
Nevada National Security Site

More than 500,000 American veterans were exposed to nuclear weapons tests from the 1940s to the early 1990s. These so-called "atomic veterans" were not permitted to speak about their participation in the tests until 1996 when the Nuclear Radiation and Secrecy Agreements Laws were repealed. Now the veterans who were exposed to the radiation from the weapons program will be offered a certificate marking their contribution.

Image of atomic wasteland in Nagasaki
Hayashi Shigeo, Courtesy of Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum

In 1945, the United States dropped two atomic bombs in Japan, killing more than 200,000 individuals within a year.

Congressman David Price
price.house.gov

U.S. Rep. David Price (D-NC) has been in the middle of conversations in Washington about limiting Iran's nuclear capabilities.

As a member of the House Subcommittee on Homeland Security, Rep. Price has been pushing for the agreement the Obama Administration announced last week to deter Iran from developing a nuclear weapon. 

It sets parameters that supporters say will yield a final agreement by this summer. Critics say it does not go far enough, calling for more sanctions on Iran or more Congressional control over the deal.

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During the Cold War, many Americans lived in fear of a nuclear attack from the Soviet Union. But the United States experienced one of its closest brushes with nuclear disaster on its own soil. On January 23, 1961 a B-52 bomber accident caused two hydrogen bombs to drop over Goldsboro, North Carolina.

Elin O'Hara Slavick

In a little less than a month, Hiroshima, Japan will reach a sad milestone. On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped one of only two atomic bombs ever used in an act of aggression. It leveled the city, killing an estimated 80,000 people outright.

Former CIA analyst Ray McGovern is worried that the United States is going to go to war with Iran. McGovern was an outspoken critic of the conflict in Iraq and he is afraid that a determined Israeli