NC Teachers

Teacher in classroom with students.
woodleywonderworks / Flickr - Creative Commons - https://flic.kr/p/auPuAq

Teachers across the state of North Carolina who haven’t been able to pass a licensure exam could get an extension from the General Assembly.

Hundreds of teachers rallied at North Carolina’s state capital last week to call for more resources for educators and students. A lot of demands and claims and counter claims swirled around the gathering – from teacher’s groups and Republican lawmakers. That meant the Raleigh News and Observer’s Paul Specht was busy. He joins WFAE's "Morning Edition" host Lisa Worf. 

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Education was top of mind in Raleigh this week. There was a major teacher rally, as well as the passage of a House spending plan.

Becki Gray of the John Locke Foundation and Rob Schofield of NC Policy Watch discuss highlights - and lowlights - from this budget proposal, while also offering reactions to the educators who demonstrated at the legislature.

Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Republicans in the House are moving forward with their version of the state budget. Teachers and supporters who took to the streets in protest over funding were disappointed that the proposal did not meet their demands. Gov. Roy Cooper was also left wanting; now questions have arisen over whether he would veto a budget that does not provide for Medicaid expansion. 

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Thousands of teachers gathered outside the General Assembly this week to call on lawmakers to improve resources, funding, and student support.

Meanwhile lawmakers inside the legislature gave approval to a House budget. WUNC politics reporter Rusty Jacobs discusses the #Red4Ed rally, some of the details from the spending plan, as well as his former life as an actor.

Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Thousands of educators and their supporters from across North Carolina are filling the streets of downtown Raleigh today to demand greater financial investment in public schools from the state legislature. The demonstration comes two days after the House revealed its draft budget for the state, which does not meet most of the marchers' demands.

Demonstrators today held signs with messages for lawmakers, including "They say cut back, we say fight back," and "Don't make me use my teacher voice."

demonstrators holding a banner that says 'Strong Students, Strong Schools, Strong Communities'
Rusty Jacobs/WUNC

Educators from around the state are descending on Raleigh today to call on lawmakers to increase support for public schools. Last year a similar teacher protest drew about 20,000 educators and supporters to North Carolina’s capital.

A North Carolina Public Schools bus in Orange County.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

North Carolina teachers didn't win the pay hikes and other changes they sought last year, despite a rally that brought 20,000 people to the capital, but they believe their activism helped elect a more sympathetic legislature and will take to the streets again Wednesday.

Delven Mearis of Durham Public Schools rallied as small crowd waited for busloads of teachers to arrive ahead of the march.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Following the success of last year’s walkout, North Carolina teachers are staging another protest tomorrow. This year an expected 31 school districts have cancelled classes in anticipation of the rally. Stated goals include: increasing minimum wage to $15; reinstating compensation for advanced degrees; and providing more classroom support.

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper sits for an interview with WUNC in the Executive Mansion in Raleigh, N.C., Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. Cooper addressed the opiod crisis affecting the state.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Governor Roy Cooper on Monday said expanding educational opportunities and access to health insurance are key strategies to bridge the divide between the state's rural and urban communities.

a street sign with the words education and future on them
Creative Commons/TCODL

 

Note: This segment is a rebroadcast from January 16, 2018. 

Education equity is becoming a popular phrase among educators, but what does it mean, and what is North Carolina doing to provide a sound education to both privileged and disadvantaged students? Nonprofit news organization EdNC explores the topic in their new documentary series “Equity Meets Education,” a story told through the eyes of four African-American leaders. 

FT. BRAGG STORIES: 'Not Afraid Of The Fight'

Jul 15, 2018
Portrait of James Quigg
Norman Kent Photography

Many soldiers who decide to leave the military put their training to use in civilian careers. James Quigg is no different, although his career choice is somewhat unusual.  

He's a professional mixed martial arts fighter known as the Gentleman Brawler. 

"It can be pretty miserable to fight me, even if you're winning," said Quigg. "I'm not afraid of the fight." 

YouTube / Durham Public Schools

The Durham school board has voted 6 to 1 to close schools to students on May 16. That's the date of a planned teacher demonstration at the state legislature in support of increased public school funding.

a teacher in a classroom
Bart Everson / Flickr/Creative Commons

The State Board of Education this week heard a draft report on the State of the Teaching Profession. The annual report  details the attrition rates for teachers in North Carolina.

Courtesy of Terrance Ruth

As a black boy growing up in Florida, Terrance Ruth was inspired to become a teacher not by anyone at his school, but by his mother. She was a nurse at a youth psych ward and often brought her children with her to work.

Justin Ashley

Justin Ashley was a star teacher at McAlpine Elementary School in Charlotte. In 2013 he won state awards naming him “Teacher of the Year” in history and social studies. But his personal life was falling apart. Ashley says he had $100 in his bank account and a worsening prescription drug addiction.