#MeToo

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Paula Vogel’s play “How I Learned to Drive” tells the story of Li’l Bit, a 35-year-old woman looking back at painful and humorous moments of her far-too-early sexual awakening at the deft and exploitative hands of her Uncle Peck. When it first hit the stage in 1997, it stealthily took audiences along for the ride as it revealed tightly-sealed truths about sexual abuse. Today’s #MeToo-era audiences will find the work just as searing as it adds to the conversations about sexual trauma and its long-lasting wounds. 

Nathan E. Bradshaw as Duke Vincentio and Rosemary Richards as Isabella in Shakespeare's 'Measure for Measure,' on stage in Raleigh January 11th - 27th.
Courtesy of Dennis Berfield

Shakespeare’s “Measure for Measure” has long been considered one of the Bard of Avon’s “problem plays”: It is neither a comedy nor a drama, and it touches on some especially contentious topics. Written in the early 1600s, the play depicts sexual assault and harassment, and it poses a particular set of challenges for directors and actors staging the production today: How can a modern version provide new insight into the conversation around consent? And what exactly was Shakespeare trying to say about sexual assault? 

a photo of a cat and dog in front of a Christmas tree dressed in holiday clothing.
@RamboThePuppy

 “The State of Things” started 2018 with two new producers who brought an array of perspectives and talent to the show. One of them was Dana Terry: an entertainment industry veteran with years of experience producing for drivetime radio shows. This is her first foray into public radio, and she brought with her a number of entertainment industry contacts.

 

AP Photo/Eric Risberg

The man once known fondly as “America’s Dad” now faces three to 10 years in state prison. 81-year-old Bill Cosby was sentenced last week for drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand, one of more than 60 women who has come forward with assault allegations against Cosby.

Creative Commons / pxhere

Kitchens in America’s top-rated restaurants have long been a boys club in which men hold the positions of power and women have to play by their rules, even when they cross the line. However, the reaction to allegations against top chefs and media darlings like Mario Batali show that the tides may be turning as the #MeToo movement enters the kitchen.

NC Legislative Building
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Stateline’s annual legislative review analyzes how political trends affect policy questions in legislatures around the country. This year’s findings examine decisions about Medicaid expansion, the impact of the #MeToo movement on policy and behavior, the changing power of unions, gun control legislation in the wake of the Las Vegas and Parkland shootings, and the ongoing fight over sanctuary cities and immigration policy. 

photo of michelle lhooq in a club
Luis Nieto Dickens

Female and queer artists will make up a majority of the lineup at this year’s Moogfest in downtown Durham. It’s a roster that pushes back against the prominence of men as the creators, performers and promoters in the electronic music industry.

A picture of an 'I Voted' sticker.
Vox Efx / Flickr

North Carolinians had their say at the polls Tuesday in the 2018 primary election. There were primary challenges in almost every Congressional district, and Democrats running for every legislative seat in the state.

Beyond #MeToo Program Special

Jan 21, 2018
Beyond #MeToo
WNYC

Beyond #MeToo is a four-part live program series featuring interviews and  your calls on the aftermath of the #MeToo moment.   

WUNC presents Beyond #MeToo, four one-hour conversations focused on what we need to do as a society to remedy widespread sexual harassment. The four-night broadcast event will cover the workplace, corrective responses, how we are raising and educating our children in this environment, and how men can play a role in the solution. 

The program airs at 8 p.m. starting January 22.

courtesy of Natasha Powell Walker

Visual artist Natasha Powell Walker was struck by the dichotomy required of her as a woman in corporate America: at work she had to be cutthroat and self-promotional, while her friends and family expected her to be loving and nurturing as soon as she left the office.

Voice Male magazine editor Rob Okun and other men at the Massachusetts state house in Boston taking the White Ribbon campaign's pledge to be part of the solution in ending violence again women.
Courtesy of Rob Okun

The #MeToo movement has broken a decades-long culture of silence around sexual assault and harassment and taken down a number of powerful men, including Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, TV host Matt Lauer, politician Al Franken, and 30 some others compiled in a list from The New York Times. But according to writer Rob Okun, the thing that ties together all of these individual incidents is a culture of power and privilege held in place by particular ideas about masculinity.