Medicaid

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Republican Dan Forest wants to be promoted to governor of North Carolina.  

Forest, in his second-term as lieutenant governor, says  Democratic incumbent Roy Cooper is too liberal.

On this edition of the WUNC Politics Podcast, Forest gives his take on Medicaid expansion, why he believes a significant expansion of charter schools would benefit public education, and why he's happy to have a primary opponent for 2020. 


WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

More "mini budgets" advanced in the North Carolina General Assembly this week. 

Lawmakers recieved warning that the planned transformation of the Medicaid program could be disrupted by the absense of a complete state budget.

And, for the first time in years, a legislative committee discussed proposals for reforming the redistricting process.

Billy Ball of NC Policy Watch and Becki Gray of the John Locke Foundation review some of the happenings in North Carolina politics this week. 
 


SEAN HOBSON / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

Exhausted by the longest legislative session since 2001, state lawmakers are pushing through piecemeal spending measures as the full budget sits in the senate. Governor Cooper signed off on raises for most state employees, but public school teachers as well as staff at state universities and community colleges are still waiting.

www.ncleg.net / NC General Assembly

More than 40 days have gone by since the North Carolina budget was supposed to be enacted. Since the start of the new fiscal year on July 1, negotiations between Republican legislative leaders and Gov. Roy Cooper have barely budged. Cooper vetoed the latest Republican House budget citing low pay increases for teachers and the absence of Medicaid expansion.

North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services headquarters at Dorothea Dix in Raleigh.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

Hundreds of families with children with severe intellectual and developmental disabilities will soon receive robust help from the state.

Lawmakers have approved an expansion to the Innovations Waiver program, which pays for services that help families and individuals with IDD.

North Carolina is now tracking babies born with alcohol or drug dependencies.
Tulane Publications / Flickr, Creative Commons

Open enrollment began this week for 540,000 Medicaid recipients in North Carolina who will be transitioning from fee-for-service to a managed care system.

"This change is the most signifigant one that has happend in the Medicaid program since its inception," said Debra Farrington, chief of staff of the N.C. Medicaid program.

Farrington said enrollees will be asked to select from a number of pre-paid health plans administered by private entities contracting with the state and physicians.

NC Legislature
W Edward Callis III

North Carolina legislators took an initial step Tuesday toward expanding Medicaid coverage to more working families after nearly a decade of Republican opposition when a GOP-designed plan easily passed a committee with bipartisan support.

Jacob Fields, right, plays walks with his son Roan, left, in a wooded area adjacent to Murdoch Developmental Center in Butner, N.C. on Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

For families with special needs children, putting kids into institutional care is often a desperate act of last resort. Many parents and caregivers prefer to keep their children at home where they can give them as much love and attention as possible, but they need help to do so. Families of children with severe intellectual and developmental disabilities are eligible for assistance from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services through a portion of Medicaid called the Innovations Waiver.

NC General Assembly; State Legislature.
Dave Crosby / Flickr Share-Alike

North Carolina Democrats have found strength in numbers, and they are using if to push for an ambitious – if lofty – agenda.

North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services headquarters at Dorothea Dix in Raleigh.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

The consortium of hospitals that was denied a contract to manage Medicaid beneficiaries has appealed its rejection. The appeal will be considered by North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Mandy Cohen.

A table showing that North Carolina's uninsured rate is higher than the average U.S. rate.
North Carolina Justice Center

North Carolina is home to one of the largest uninsured populations in the country. The latest Census data indicates that of the more than one million people in North Carolina living without health insurance, many are employed workers. 

Georgetown University Health Policy Institute

Four-thousand more children in North Carolina went uninsured in 2017 than in the previous year. That's as the number of children around the country without health insurance went up for the first time in a decade, according to a recent analysis from the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute.

photo of a doctor
www.maxpixel.net/Doctor-Medicine-Health-Stetoscope-Medical-563428

North Carolina has finally obtained official federal government approval to shift the state's Medicaid program to a managed-care system.

NC Legislative Building
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Stateline’s annual legislative review analyzes how political trends affect policy questions in legislatures around the country. This year’s findings examine decisions about Medicaid expansion, the impact of the #MeToo movement on policy and behavior, the changing power of unions, gun control legislation in the wake of the Las Vegas and Parkland shootings, and the ongoing fight over sanctuary cities and immigration policy. 

A nurse performs her work at a community health clinic.
Sabin Institute / Flickr/Creative Commons, https://flic.kr/p/ooK2xw

 

As the Trump administration continues to chip away at Obamacare, many public health practitioners are left wondering how the changes will affect their clients. The statewide sexual health non-profit Shift NC has voiced particular concerns about how the administration’s policies could affect underserved teens and adolescents.

Donald Trump makes first speech to the UN
Richard Drew / AP Photo - 2017

After multiple failed attempts by Republican leaders to repeal the Affordable Care Act, GOP lawmakers are back with their newest repeal effort. The Graham-Cassidy bill would cap funding to Medicaid, and many opponents say it would leave millions of people without healthcare coverage. 

Governor Roy Cooper's administration is proposing an overhauled Medicaid program that would combine behavioral health and primary health care.  

San Diego Personal Injury Attorney / Flickr/ Creative Commons

 Earlier this week, President Trump unveiled his budget proposal for 2018. The plan cuts more than $600 billion from Medicaid in the next decade, which would affect  nearly two million enrollees in North Carolina. The budget also includes deep cuts to health research and higher education.


WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this edition of the WUNC politics podcast, a conversation with Rose Hoban of North Carolina Heath News.

Richard Topping is the Chief Executive Officer of Cardinal Innovations Healthcare.
Cardinal Innovations Healthcare

The CEO of Cardinal Innovations Healthcare Solutions, a company that accepts hundreds of millions of dollars in state and federal Medicaid money to pay for the care of mental and behavioral health patients in North Carolina, was overpaid by $1.2 million, and the company’s executives and board of directors enjoyed retreats, chartered flights, Christmas parties and other perks "potentially resulting in the erosion of public trust," according to an audit.

Governor Roy Cooper
Logan Ulrich / WUNC

Governor Roy Cooper laid out his vision for North Carolina in an inaugural address Saturday morning.

He said he wants to expand Medicaid, focus on economic problems instead of social issues, and called on lawmakers and residents to rise above partisan politics.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Just as a new Republican-led Congress on Capitol Hill is discussing how to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, North Carolina's newly elected governor pledged to implement portions of the ACA that had been left behind in this state.

An image of an empty hospital bed
Public domain

Thousands of Medicaid recipients across North Carolina are being denied government-assisted funding for personal-care services. In April 2015, the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services Division of Medical Assistance changed the requirements for personal-care eligibility.

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services says it's working to reduce the error rate in Medicaid payments to providers and hospitals.

A new report from State Auditor Beth Wood says North Carolina improperly spent $835 million last year.

A picture of a young man with his head in his hands.
Sander van der Wel / Wikipedia

More adults are coming under the legal authority of guardians. Many adults who are declared incompetent by a court have a relative who takes over guardianship. But for those who don't, the state takes over that role.

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services said in an e-mail that there were about 3,000 adults with public guardians in 2007. That number is expected to double by about 2017.

ICD-9 logo
http://icd9cm.drgily.com/ / Wikipedia

Doctors and hospitals will have a higher bar to clear when submitting insurance claims, starting today.

Federal law requires them to begin tracking patient care and submitting insurance claims using the more specific ICD-10 coding system. The broader ICD-9 had been in place for decades.

Julie Henry is a spokeswoman for the North Carolina Hospital Association.

Jorge Valencia / WUNC

Bill Would Ban The Sale Of Fetal Tissue From Abortions

Republicans in the Senate's rules committee cleared a bill on Wednesday  that would ban the sale of fetal tissue from abortions.

House Bill 297  is a reaction to a national controversy after an anti-abortion group’s undercover videos suggested Planned Parenthood was selling fetal tissue from abortions.  

The chambers of the NC State House
Jorge Valencia / WUNC

The North Carolina House and Senate approved on Tuesday afternoon a long-awaited plan to overhaul the state's Medicaid system. The proposal could affect more than 1.5 million people who receive health care through the publicly-funded program, but it could take years for it to be fully implemented.

Top Republicans celebrated on Tuesday as they passed a proposal they've been working on for four years. Medicaid serves about 1.8 million people who qualify as low-income or disabled, almost one fifth of the state population.

About 1.8 million people in North Carolina receive healthcare through Medicaid. The program provides for those who are low income and is funded by federal and state dollars.

A recent state audit found that the organization overseeing most Medicaid patients has saved taxpayers more than a billion dollars since 2002. Still, state lawmakers have been poised for years to overhaul the system, and it appears now that a deal is close.

A picture of a woman with a bathtub balance seat.
Richard Duncan / CDC

North Carolina's population is aging quickly, increasing the demand for personal caregivers. But a report from a poverty advocacy organization says elderly people might have trouble finding reliable care unless caregivers' wages increase.

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