Local Band

Manifest music festival's poster: A person with a heart shaped face holds a baby and a piece of cake that's on fire.
Ria Aubry Taylor

No one ever asks Henbrain to turn up the bass. The band features two electric basses chugging alongside one another, which defines its low-frequency acid rock sound.

Michelle Sontheimer plays lead axe, running her sound through a guitar amplifier and effects processor, which produces a meaty buzz that she describes as a “2,000 pound angry bee.” Cutting through the low-frequency symphony are Erika Libero’s vocals. Her lyrics are a select cross-section of mythology, exploring topics from the Greek Elysian Fields to a Nekomata, an ancient Japanese demon cat. The band also includes Ryan Yancey on bass and drummer Derrek Spronk.

You either DIY or You Die

Sep 9, 2019
Rose DeConto / WUNC

Starting a band is hard. I would know because I’ve been in four at this point. It’s hard enough to get people to show up for rehearsal – and it’s even harder when you’re under 18. People sometimes don’t take you seriously. They’ll assume you’re not good at playing, or they’ll take advantage of you.

The album cover featuers a hand gripping a chin and neck.
Courtesy of Loamlands

Durham-based, local legend Kym Register, who performs as Loamlands, returns this summer with their sophomore album “Lez Dance.”

photo of the band playing onstage
Courtesy of Farewell Friend

Under the umbrella of “alternative country,” you will find the music of Farewell Friend. Guitarist and vocalist Tom Troyer, guitarist Mark Byerly, and upright bass player Evan Campfield perform live at the Triad Stage’s Upstage Cabaret in Greensboro.

photo courtesy of Young Yonder

The members of the band Young Yonder all have day jobs – in fact several of them met while helping customers at the Apple store. They make music work by packing in practices and tightly coordinating schedules.