KKK

Autumn Karen

As a professional ghostwriter, Autumn Karen is usually forbidden to discuss her projects or her behind-the-scenes role in creating them. But the author of a recently-published book insisted that her name grace the cover along with his. “Mississippi Still Burning: From Hoods to Suits” (One Human Race Inc./2018) is James Stern’s incredible true story of being a black man incarcerated with Edgar Ray Killen, an Imperial Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan and the man convicted of the 1964 triple-homicide of three civil rights activitsts. 

Courtesy of Kelly Baker

Most people think of white supremacy and racialized hate groups as being organized around beliefs. But author Kelly Baker points to their important use of things.

In her essay “The Artifacts of White Supremacy,” she reveals how the Klan appropriated Protestant imagery and objects to brand themselves, recruit members and attempt to gain legitimacy. She says the white supremacists’ use of the white robe, fiery cross and even the American flag was an attempt at making their beliefs more tangible — and more performative.

Protesters hold a sign at an anti-KKK rally in downtown Durham on Friday, August 18, 2017.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Updated 5:13 p.m., August 18, 2017

Several thousand people marched in downtown Durham in a demonstration against racism on Friday afternoon.

A picture of Saunders Hall
Mr. Granger / Wikipedia

Trustees at UNC-Chapel Hill voted 10-3 this morning to drop the name from Saunders Hall.

The building was named in 1920 for Confederate Colonel and UNC alumnus and trustee William Lawrence Saunders. Saunders served as North Carolina Secretary of State from 1879 until 1891. Saunders was also a member of the Ku Klux Klan.

KKK members take weapons from the back of a car prior to the shooting between them and members of the Workers Viewpoint Organization/Communist Workers Party on Nov. 3, 1979.
News & Record file photo

In 1979 a clash between white supremacist groups and protestors in Greensboro left five dead and 12 badly injured.   The incident gained national attention and over the past 36 years the city has undergone a number of programs to try and provide some reconciliation.  But a new move by the North Carolina Highway Advisory Marker Committee is drawing some controversy.