K-12

Liz Schlemmer

 

 

The gym at Lakewood Elementary in Durham was buzzing earlier this week with families coming to pick up math workbooks, hotspots and laptops on the school’s final day of device distribution.

This is the second week of virtual learning at Durham Public Schools, but distribution was delayed after shipments of Chromebooks were held up at U.S. Customs — one of many unforeseen events in a school year marked by a pandemic.

As the school year starts in many districts across the country, a new national poll of teachers from NPR/Ipsos finds overwhelming trepidation about returning to the physical classroom.

Student practices wheel throwing in an East Carolina University ceramics class.
Courtesy of East Carolina University

Teachers and college professors have been given a huge challenge this month -- how to quickly adapt their classes for long-distance learning. North Carolina teachers are getting creative to engage their students.

WCPSS

North Carolina public school buildings are now closed until at least May 15, but educators are still working to teach students remotely. 

Wake County Public Schools is one of a number of districts across the state providing a website with online resources to give parents and students some guidance on how to maintain learning during this unprecedented time away from the classroom. You can find the website here

Stanly County Public Schools teacher Kristen Herlocker hands a bag lunch to a student at his bus stop.
Kristen Herlocker

Imagine a nine year old kid, stuck at home, who typically eats both breakfast and lunch at school. So what happens if his parents are struggling more than ever, and schools close to prevent the spread of COVID-19?

Amia Byrd, 7, looks at the book Rapunzel in the children's section at the Richard B. Harrison Community Library on July 9, 2018.
Madeline Gray / For WUNC

Families across North Carolina are adjusting to a new way of life — and of learning. 

A sign indicates a no-student drop-off zone with Wake County public school buses in the background.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

 

Governor Roy Cooper has issued an executive order requiring all K-12 public schools across North Carolina to close for at least two weeks, beginning Monday, to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

West Lumberton Elementary teacher June Hunt helps second grader Niveah Barnes with a grammar assignment in their temporary classroom at Lumberton Junior High. Flooding from Hurricane Matthew destroyed the home where NIveah was living.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

Note: This segment is a rebroadcast from January 16, 2018. 

A study from the Public School Forum of North Carolina confirms a large and growing gap in public school funding between the wealthiest and the poorest counties. The study found that in 2015-2016, the 10 highest spending counties spent $2,364 more per student than the 10 lowest-spending counties, and the gap has increased every year since 2011.

Kaiden gives her sister Karisma a ride on her bike as they play at home during summer break in Raleigh. While their mom Ayeisha Owens is at work, they stay at home with their great grandmother. They make up games and dance routines and read books, but the
Madeline Gray / For WUNC

Low-income students stand to lose two to three months of academic progress over the summer when wealthier students are often making slight gains, according to the National Summer Learning Association.

Naloxone kit
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

With the opioid epidemic touching the lives of one in three North Carolinians, what can schools do to help? A lot, according to school nurses.

Teachers in North Carolina have seen pay raises
www.audio-luci-store.it / Flickr

Alongside reading, writing and math, schools should teach students how to manage their feelings, too. That's a new recommendation from the federal Administration for Children and Families.