Jim Crow

Not all racially-motivated killings in the Jim Crow-era were classified as "lynchings." Activists are trying to document the rest.

"The Making Of A Racist"

Aug 17, 2016
Book cover of "The Making of a Racist," by Charles Dew
Charles Dew

Like any good historian, Charles Dew was trained to conduct his research in a scientific fashion, setting aside any personal perspectives in his scholarship.

But after more than 50 years of teaching Southern history, he finally turned inward. His new book describes his experiences growing up on the white side of the color line in the Jim Crow South.

photo of a dress designed by Willie Kay
North Carolina Museum of History

For much of the 20th century, Willie Otey Kay was a household name among the fashion-conscious in Raleigh. The designer and dressmaker crafted one-of-a-kind fashion for women to wear to weddings, debutante balls, and other formal events.

An image of 'In Abraham's Bosom' by Paul Green
Paul Green Foundation

In 1926, North Carolina playwright Paul Green helped introduce on stage realistic depictions of life for African Americans. With his Pulitzer Prize-winning play "In Abraham's Bosom," Green told the story of Abraham McCranie, a black man who wanted to educate black children in the American South.

An image of former NCCU Chancellor Julius L. Chambers and Former NCCU professor Ernst Manasse.
NCCU Archives

In 1939, Nazi leadership in Germany prohibited Jewish professors from teaching at colleges and universities. Many of the Jewish scholars who fled the country found a haven in the historically black colleges and universities in the American South. 

Animation still artwork
Ammar Nasri and Zhou Quan

During the Jim Crow era, many businesses and establishments were not friendly to African-Americans which made traveling both inconvenient and dangerous for black families.

  The late 19th century American South was marked by inequality; Jim Crow was the law of the land and racial segregation was both a social norm and a legal requirement.