Immigration

A brown skinned woman with two hands over her face, the hand on the right side is white and the hand on the left side is black. The same woman is also shown at the bottom right corner of the picture with her head and hands up, her mouth is also open .
Seeco

Activists and artists continue fighting to awaken U.S. arts institutions to the foundational Blackness of Rock, EDM and Punk. The whitewashing of music and dance is a supremacist project throughout the Americas. Choreographers and instructors oftentimes ignore the West African traditions undergirding salsa, merengue, tango, and bachata.

A black background with the words 'I Am A White Mexican' in bold, yellow/gold letters
Latino Rebels

Scrolling through the comments on her article published in the online news platform Latino Rebels, Roosbelinda Cárdenas found a picture of herself alongside a lively discussion of her race. Non-Latinx white users weighed in, confident she did not meet their standards of whiteness. Others used their own genetics and apparent non-whiteness as evidence against her own assertion of whiteness.

A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement official stands with his back to the camera as someone is led away by other officials.
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Sheriffs in North Carolina are signing new agreements with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Under the new Warrant Service Officer program, local law enforcement officials can serve federal administrative warrants and transfer detainees into ICE custody.

 

Demonstrators hold up signs in support of the DACA program.
Courtesy of Laura Garduño Garcia

Last Monday opened the beginning of a tense week for many U.S. immigrants. Then, relief: The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday to uphold the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which protects over 600,000 people in the country from deportation. 

Updated 5:45 p.m. ET

President Trump on Monday extended a freeze on green cards for new immigrants and signed an executive order to suspend new H-1B, L-1, J and other temporary work visas for skilled workers, managers and au pairs through the end of the year.

The goal of the move is to protect 525,000 jobs as part of the White House response to job losses caused by the coronavirus pandemic, said a senior administration official, who spoke to reporters on the condition of anonymity. NPR first reported the impending order on Saturday.

Updated at 6:35 p.m. ET

In a major rebuke to President Trump, the U.S. Supreme Court has blocked the administration's plan to dismantle an Obama-era program that has protected 700,000 so-called DREAMers from deportation. The vote was 5-4, with Chief Justice John Roberts writing the opinion.

Donn Young

Seventy-two of the 33,863 people currently detained by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement have tested positive for COVID-19 as of Monday, April 13. That is a higher infection rate than the general U.S. population, and immigrant rights groups dispute those official numbers, saying new detainees are not tested upon arrival. 

Refugee  children pose for a photo in front of a school bus.
Courtesy of the New Arrivals Institute

Southeast Asian refugees first arrived in Greensboro after the Vietnam War. Now, more than 40 years later, the city continues to welcome families fleeing violence.

A farm worker out in the field.
U.S. Department of Agriculture /

New proposed rules from the U.S. Department of Labor could impact tens of thousands of temporary immigrant farm workers who come to North Carolina each year.

Allison Swaim / WUNC

I'm in the 11th grade at Riverside High School, and I'll begin attending Durham Tech this year. I intend to graduate, and I've never considered dropping out. That's because I know I have a great opportunity in this country that my parents never had.

ICE Officers detain a man.
Charles Reed / AP

The coordinated immigration raids slated for this week did not take place at the scale announced by top administration officials.

Christina Westover / U.S. Army

Thousands of military personnel were deployed to the U.S.-Mexico border in the fall of last year. At the time President Donald Trump said their purpose was to bolster security and help reduce illegal border crossings.

Rihanna fled the threat of violence in El Salvador in 2014.
Michal Huniewicz / Creative Commons

President Donald Trump’s administration has made several significant shifts in the country’s immigration policies, including a travel ban on those from several Muslim-majority countries; reducing the number of refugees admitted to the country; and enforcing policies that make it harder for individuals to seek asylum in the United States. A case in western North Carolina highlights the impact of the changes for asylum-seekers.

A new generation of migrants is arriving in Mexico: young adults who were born in Mexico, raised in the United States and are now returning — some voluntarily, some by force — to the country of their birth. They've been dubbed "Generation 1.5."

With only limited support available from the Mexican government for these often well-educated returnees, several nongovernmental organizations and at least one private company are looking to help them out and take advantage of their skills.

The White House
Noah Fortson / NPR

President Trump is unveiling an immigration plan that would vastly change who's allowed into the United States.

The administration's proposal focuses on reducing family-based immigration to the U.S. in favor of employment skill-bassed immigration. Watch his remarks from the White House Rose Garden live.

Frank, Helen and Minerva on stage at the Triad Stage.
Dana Terry/WUNC

One of the first undocumented immigrants to seek sanctuary in a North Carolina church has been granted permanent residency.

A group of sanctuary leaders
Courtesy of Tina Vasquez

New reporting from Rewire.News reveals what some are calling alarming communications between U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the services arm of federal immigration, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

photo of Sheriff Lowell Griffin at his desk
Henderson County Sheriff's Office

The North Carolina House of Representatives passed a bill earlier this week that would force county sheriff departments to assist with detaining immigrants or face a stiff fine. This bill comes in the wake of many sheriff departments around the state choosing to end their cooperation with  Immigrations and Customs Enforcement through both detainers and the 287 (g) program.

Updated at 7:50 a.m. ET

The hotel chain Motel 6 has agreed to pay $12 million to settle a lawsuit filed by the state of Washington after several locations gave information on thousands of guests to Immigration and Customs Enforcement without warrants.

Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson said Thursday that Motel 6 shared the information of about 80,000 guests in the state from 2015 to 2017.

post for the Connect Beyond Festival 2019
Jessica Tomasin

In 1948, a plane deporting 28 migrant farmworkers crashed in Fresno County, California killing 32 people. In some of the press coverage, reporters omitted only the names of the migrants, while naming the flight crew and security.

a photo of Smiley's Farmer's Market empty.
Cass Herrington

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested more than 200 people around North Carolina in early February. And according to new reporting, this action had a noticeable impact on local commerce in western North Carolina. 

Courtesy of Edwin Castellanos

When thousands of Central Americans moved en masse toward the border between Mexico and the U.S. in 2018, violence and poverty were named as the culprits behind the immigrants’ journey. But according to Edwin Castellanos, another factor could be just as much to blame. 

When migrant children cross the border without their parents, they're sent to federal shelters until caseworkers can find them a good home. But everything changes when they turn 18. That's when, in many cases, they're handcuffed and locked up in an adult detention facility. The practice is sparking lawsuits and outrage from immigrant advocates.

Leigh Bordley, LEAP's executive director, admires an airplane a preschool student built out of toys.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

It's 10 o'clock on a Tuesday morning at the LEAP Academy's Nuestra Escuelita, in Durham. That means it's music time. A circle of three- and four-year-olds dance and sing songs.

"Don Alfredo, baila," they sing, their little arms and legs moving in half-coordinated gestures. "Baila, baila, baila!"

Photo from the ICE raid at Bear Creek Arsenal in Sanford.
Courtesy of Ilana Dubester

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents detained at least 200 people in North Carolina earlier this month. In a press conference, ICE Atlanta Field Office Director Sean Gallagher told journalists that more visible enforcement is a direct consequence of decreased cooperation between ICE and local law enforcement agencies. 

A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) arrest.
Wikimedia Commons

Last week U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents detained at least 200 people in enforcement actions around the state. Officials raided a gun manufacturing plant in Sanford and arrested people at traffic stop check points in various cities. 

Protestors surround a car
Alerta Migratoria NC

A man who was seeking sanctuary in a church in Durham was tackled and detained by  Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents at a routine immigration appointment last week. Samuel Oliver-Bruno arrived at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office in Morrisville, North Carolina when plainclothes ICE agents got to him. 

A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) arrest.
Wikimedia Commons

In North Carolina some voters are weighing in on an issue that has a big impact on immigrant families. The 287(g) program allows local law enforcement officials to partner with immigration agents. Six counties in North Carolina currently have 287(g) agreements: Cabarrus, Gaston, Henderson, Mecklenburg, Nash and Wake. The program has become a hot topic in several of North Carolina’s County Sheriff’s races.

Ana Nuñez
Courtesy of Ana Nuñez / Fay and Grafton

Ana Nuñez was nine years old before she ever stepped foot inside a grocery store or tasted an apple. Nuñez grew up in Cuba with intermittent access to food and medicine and abundant electricity shortages. In 1991 her father defected to the United States, and a couple years later the family followed.

Carolina Performing Arts launches its new season with an event that challenges society’s narrow view of citizenship. The collaborative piece asks: what if citizenship was defined by how someone contributes instead of where someone was born?

 

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