Hurricane Matthew

It's been a year since Hurricane Matthew dumped a dozen or more inches of rain on central and eastern North Carolina. Record flooding in the days following the storm devastated communities downstream. In all, 26 people in North Carolina died, farmers lost billions of dollars in crops and livestock, and cities along North Carolina's major rivers were waterlogged for weeks.

For a closer look at how communities in North Carolina have coped with the aftermath of the storm, click on the stories below.

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view of flooded I-95 after Hurricane Matthew
Jay Price / WUNC

Gov. Roy Cooper has signed into law bills designed to help his cash-strapped Department of Transportation and the continued recovery from hurricanes Florence, Matthew and Dorian.

a flooded road after Hurricane Matthew
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The North Carolina Department of Public Safety broke the law and didn't follow legislative directives when distributing $9 million of state money after Hurricane Matthew hit in 2016, according to a report Monday from the General Assembly's government watchdog agency.

A photo taken by Kareem White's friend shows what the apartment complex looked like before Hurricane Matthew's waters receded.
Photo courtesy of Kareen White

North Carolina officials say a deadline is looming for homeowners who suffered damage in a 2016 hurricane.

The application deadline for a Hurricane Matthew housing recovery program is Friday.

Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Hurricane Matthew caused nearly $5 billion in damages across half the state's 100 counties and forced 4,000 evacuees into shelters. But missteps by an executive agency have delayed distribution of all but 3% of more than $236 million in federal Community Development Block Grant - Disaster Recovery, or CDBG-DR, funds.

Wilson Sayre / WUNC

Willie May Mckellar has lived at Turner Park mobile home community for 22 years. Out in front of her home she points out water that has been standing in large potholes for days. She points to the tree in front of her home. The roots have grown up under the building and crumpled the skirting around the bottom of her single-wide trailer. She owns her home, but not the land underneath it. These are issues she think the new owners of the park should address because she pays rent for the land.

Artist's rendering of the proposed Civil War and Reconstruction History Center planned for Fayetteville's Arsenal Park.
North Carolina Civil War and Reconstruction History Center

Advocates for a new North Carolina Civil War and Reconstruction History Center say the proposed museum will draw visitors to Fayetteville and offer online history education to schools statewide.

a flooded road after Hurricane Matthew
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A group of state lawmakers dusted off two seemingly controversial topics during a committee meeting Wednesday afternoon, and they promised further review and scrutiny of practices by the Governor.

Courtesy of Michelle Skipper

When Hurricane Matthew devastated her rural community, Michelle Skipper was there to help. She and her husband cooked and did laundry for hundreds of people staying at an emergency shelter in St. Pauls, a small town in Eastern North Carolina. 

a flooded road after Hurricane Matthew
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

North Carolina's director of emergency management said the pace of distributing federal relief funds to Hurricane Matthew victims will pick up soon.

Courtesy of Martha Quillin / News & Observer

When Hurricane Matthew flooded low-lying areas across Eastern North Carolina in October 2016, thousands of people were displaced. As Martha Quillin writes in the News & Observer, it wasn’t just the living who moved.

A sign in front of West Lumberton Elementary, the only Robeson County school that remains closed a year after Hurricane Matthew. The storm dumped about three feet of standing water into the building, and destroyed many of its students' homes.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

A Robeson County elementary school damaged by Hurricane Matthew will close for good. The decision came after a group of parents pleaded to keep it open.

NC State House
Courtesy of NCGA

Republican legislative leaders released their plan for the state budget late Monday. The bill includes a 6.5 percent average pay hike for teachers, raises for full-time state employees, and a $60 million fund for continued Hurricane Matthew recovery.

Overhead view of Hurricane Matthew
NASA / Flickr

North Carolina's coastal ecosystem has drastically changed because of two decades of hurricanes and other tropical cyclones.

Overhead view of Hurricane Matthew
NASA / Flickr

It's Hurricane Preparedness week, and North Carolina public safety officials want residents to consider how vulnerable they'd be if a big storm hit their area.

Elizabeth DeKonty, a fellow with the Public School Forum of North Carolina, speaks with Pattillo Middle School’s resilience team about strategies for supporting students, many of whom live in poverty.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

One day last fall, teachers sauntered past a wall in W.A. Pattillo Middle School in Tarboro as if they were studying works of art. Really, they were looking at the names of all 265 of their students, each written neatly on an index card.

view of flooded I-95 after Hurricane Matthew
Jay Price / WUNC

Small business owners affected by Hurricane Matthew can apply for assistance from a new block grant program.

Princeville, Hurricane Matthew
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

It's been one year since Hurricane Matthew devastated the tiny town of Princeville.  The mighty storm forced millions of gallons of water to swell past a levee along the Tar River, flooding most of the historic African-American community.

flooding in Raleigh
Gerry Broome / AP

A year ago, Hurricane Matthew dumped a dozen or more inches of rain on central and eastern North Carolina. Record flooding in the days following the storm devastated communities downstream.

A sign in front of West Lumberton Elementary, the only Robeson County school that remains closed a year after Hurricane Matthew. The storm dumped about three feet of standing water into the building, and destroyed many of its students' homes.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

Robeson County second grader Niveah Barnes remembers one detail in particular about Hurricane Matthew.

"I wanted to talk about dinosaurs when I was in first grade, but we couldn't do that, because the flood was in the middle of the school," she said.

Fair Bluff Mayor Billy Hammond stands on Main Street in his deserted downtown on a recent weekday morning.
Jay Price / WUNC

A highway runs through Main Street in Fair Bluff, just south of Interstate 95 near the South Carolina border. It’s a classic small downtown: storefronts line both sides, a couple dozen American flags flap in the wind as decorations, and semi-trucks whistle through on their way to feed commerce somewhere else.

The flags seem festive – until you look closer.

a flooded road after Hurricane Matthew
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Multiple major hurricanes in the last few weeks have led to a renewed discussion of climate change, and when it is appropriate, to discuss possible policy and lifestyle changes.

Princeville, Flooding, Race, Hurricane Matthew
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The town of Princeville is stepping up recovery efforts after flooding from Hurricane Matthew last fall.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Gov. Roy Cooper has signed legislation directing how $100 million in additional Hurricane Matthew relief funds must be spent and requiring zip line and aerial ropes course owners to get minimum levels of liability insurance.

Overhead view of Hurricane Matthew
NASA / Flickr

Gov. Roy Cooper made another visit to Kinston as it continues to recover from Hurricane Matthew. 

The city was one of the hardest hit from the storm's record floods in October.

Elizabeth City, North Carolina
Sarah Hamilton / Flickr

Elizabeth City is taking a hit to its tourism economy as crews continue to clean up a popular boating route that's been closed since Hurricane Matthew hit in October.

2010 tornado in Iredell County, NC
England / Flickr

Officials in Bertie County are keeping a close eye on this week's rain as the county continues to recover from recent storms.

Storms in Raleigh caused flooding in Kinston. This photo was taken April 25, 2017.
Associated Press

The mayor of Kinston wants the N.C. Legislature and U.S. Congress to help prevent future floods as the Neuse River crests from more heavy rain.

Liz Bell

Many communities in eastern North Carolina are still recovering from the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew. The storm hit the East Coast last October, and in Edgecombe County hundreds of students were displaced after flooding nearly destroyed Princeville Elementary School. Now the Edgecombe County school board must decide on next steps for rebuilding the school.

A sign indicates a store is open in flood-damaged Lumberton, N.C.
Jay Price / WUNC

Almost five months after Hurricane Matthew struck Eastern North Carolina, leaving 26 people dead and an estimated $1.6 billion in property damage, part of the long-term recovery has just gotten under way.

Princeville, Hurricane Matthew, African Americans
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The tiny town of Princeville, North Carolina is still feeling the effects of Hurricane Matthew, which flooded this historic African-American town in October.

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