Haider Warraich

A photo of a young person's hands holding an elderly person's hands
Creative Commons / pxhere

For the first time since the early 1900s, more Americans are dying at home rather than in hospitals, a trend that reflects more hospice care and progress toward the kind of end that most people say they want.

Warraich's writing is anchored in his first-hand experience with patients.
Courtesy Haider Warraich

Heart disease kills more people than any other disease in the world. But as cardiologist Haider Warraich illuminates in his new book, it gets less funding and less attention than numerous other diseases, including cancer.

Men drinking beer.
Max Pixel / Max Pixel - Creative Commons

Women live longer than men in many countries around the world. In the United States, women outlive men by an average of five years. Scientists have long attributed this divide to genetics and biology, but a physician at Duke University is posing an alternative theory: toxic masculinity. 

Courtesy St. Martin's Press

Haider Warraich is only 29 years old, but he is no stranger to death. Throughout his training as a doctor, he has witnessed the death of multiple patients. Warraich was trained in the appropriate medical response to death but remained stumped by a multitude of bigger questions about the process, such as what role does religion play in a hospital, and how does social media change how we process death and dying?