Greensboro

Building A Guitar From Scratch

Jan 12, 2016
Alex Edney (L) and Terry Fritz (R) discussing the bracing on the sides of a guitar.
Fritz and Edney Guitars

Terry Fritz had two loves for most of his life: playing guitar and woodworking. During a job change in 2006, a friend suggested he marry those two passions as a luthier. Fritz quickly fell in love with the process – the properties of wood necessary for a good guitar, how to fasten the neck, the geometry that shapes the timbre of an acoustic guitar, etc.

Image of Greensboro Skyline
Beyonce245 / Wikimedia Commons

Greensboro's economy is recovering from the recession, according to the city's annual growth and development trends report.

Planning Department Director Sue Schwartz says the recession hit Greensboro early, when the local textile and furniture manufacturing jobs moved overseas. Schwartz says aviation manufacturing jobs are making a difference.

"We've seen smaller scale manufacturing coming back, but we've also seen growth in the financial sector and in health care. So we're a more diversified economy, but it takes a while to get to that point."

Several local service and faith organizations hosted a multicultural Thanksgiving Dinner to welcome immigrants and refugees.
Reema Khrais / WUNC

Local service and faith organizations are urging state leaders to not turn their backs on Syrian refugees.

Responding to a national backlash against Syrian refugees, faith leaders and several groups gathered in Greensboro Monday night for a multicultural Thanksgiving dinner to welcome local refugees and immigrants.

Conservatives Say No To The Death Penalty

Nov 17, 2015
Jon Hardister
North Carolina General Assembly

Support for the death penalty has declined over the past 20 years. A Pew Research Center poll this year shows a 30 percent drop among Democrats and a 10 percent decline in support among Republicans. However, GOP approval of the death penalty is still strong at more than 75 percent.

The Carolina SqiQuarium opened in 2013 as part of expansion plans for the whole Greensboro Science Center. The aquarium features African penguins, sharks, otters and stingrays, among others.
Greensboro Science Center

The Greensboro Science Center is the only institution in North Carolina to house a zoo, aquarium and museum under one roof, and it's one of a handful in the country. The Science Center has been in the Triad since the 1950s, but recent expansion has dramatically grown the facility into a true 3-in-1 destination.

An image of a handshake on an isolated business background
SalFalko / Flickr Creative Commons

Greensboro, High Point and Guilford County leaders are in informal talks about creating a united economic development partnership.

Guilford County Commission chairman Hank Henning says this proposed Guilford County Economic Development Alliance would coordinate to promote the county and its cities as a business destination.

27 Views Of Greensboro

Oct 13, 2015
'27 Views Of Greensboro' takes a look at the city in various forms of writing, from poetry to vignettes to short stories.
Charles Smith / Flickr Creative Commons

Greensboro has a rich history, from its days as a leader in textiles and commerce to the “Greensboro Four” sit-in.  

A group of writers with Greensboro ties came together in “27 Views of Greensboro: The Gate City in Prose & Poetry” (Eno Publishers/2015) with essays, vignettes, poems and other short stories to share their perspectives of the Triad city.

A collection of Blue Bell Wrangler artifacts showcasing their position as a player in both the work clothing and westernwear markets
Evan Morrison

Jeans are one of the most ubiquitous clothing items—found in both high-end designer boutiques and on the shelves at Wal-Mart.

Although they originated as work garments for miners, farmers and cattle workers, they have since become a more everyday item.

President Richard Nixon greeting Robert and his late wife Sallie Brown in the White House
Robert Brown

In the 1960s, High Point resident Robert Brown worked closely with Martin Luther King Jr. as a fundraiser. Brown has also advised several prominent American politicians, including Senators John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy, and Presidents Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan.

An imafe of a Bernie Sanders rally
Jorge Valencia / WUNC

After giving speeches in Georgia and South Carolina over the weekend, Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders got on stage in front of a crowd of more than nine thousand people in Greensboro Sunday evening.

He pumped up the audience to the song "Rockin' In The Free World" by Neil Young, a tune that seemed  fitting for a rally.

“Alright, are you guys ready to make a political revolution?” Sanders asked on stage followed by an enthusiastic "Yeah!" from the crowd.

Rhiannon Giddens
Michael Weintrob

For as long as she can remember, Rhiannon Giddens has been singing. Growing up in Greensboro, she sang in youth choirs, despite not knowing how to read music. But that was okay, because Giddens said she received the best kind of teaching as a child.

A picture of a slave deed.
Guilford County Register of Deeds.

Guilford County's Register of Deeds is putting bills of sale from the local slave trade on display at the International Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro until October 31.

The Register of Deeds made information from these slave records available online several months ago for people doing historical and genealogical research.

County Registrar Jeff Thigpen says this new display can make the same information seem more real.

Dale Watson
Sarah Wilson

Guitarist Dale Watson feels out of place in the modern country music world, and he is perfectly OK with that. The Texas musician believes the genre has changed so much that it lost its identity, so he created a new genre of his own—Ameripolitan.

Ameripolitan music is original music with prominent roots influence, and the genre’s tagline is, "We’re not about leaving country music behind, we’re taking the ‘real’ country music with us."

Faith Community Church
NC Warn

By any measure, the solar array on the roof of the Faith Community Church in Greensboro is small. A little more than five kilowatts. It’s barely enough to run the building’s central air conditioning for one hour a day.

North Carolina State Capitol, Raleigh.
Jim Bowen / Flickr

The North Carolina House of Representatives has rejected a controversial plan that would limit the authority of the Greensboro mayor and could change the make-up of the city council.

The House rejected the bill in a 73-35 vote on Monday night. A joint committee of House and Senate members will negotiate the terms of the measure, which had been approved by the House as a different plan, before returning it to each chamber for a new vote.

The children's area in the lobby of the new Family Justice Center.
Catherine Johnson / Guilford County Family Justice Center

A Family Justice Center is opening today in downtown Greensboro and will offer a variety of services.

The new building will provide several types of support for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and elder abuse. Those services include law enforcement, legal, medical and social assistance.

Center Director Catherine Johnson said it is a benefit that the building is a one-stop spot for people dealing with these issues.  

An image of somebody picking strawberries
Joseph Rodriguez / News & Record www.greensboro.com

Matthew King’s motto is simple: “think global but act local.”

For King, this is the solution to food insecurity. He is the executive director of Vision Tree Community Development Corporation, a nonprofit that helps Greensboro residents get food to their doorstep with mobile food markets. He said the basic idea of connecting urban farmers to local consumers can be applied anywhere in the world, but Greensboro needs it more than ever.

Image of John Hitchcock with the Front Row Gang
John Hitchcock

Greensboro native John Hitchcock attended nearly every professional wrestling show in the Greensboro Coliseum for 15 years. He was a part of a group of troublemakers who sat in the front of the coliseum cheering loudly for the bad guys and getting a rise out of the crowd and the wrestlers.

Mitchell Oliver

North Carolina native Anne-Claire Niver has been singing since she was a young child. After studying music and vocal performance at UNC-Greensboro and traveling the world, she moved home to North Carolina and started work at a family-owned farm near Rougemont.

Filming of This is My Home Now.
Siera Schubach-Mariah, Dunn Kramer, Dean MacLeod

Some of the first Montagnard immigrants, people from a mountain region of Southeast Asia, to came to North Carolina in 1986 and 1987. They were granted refugee status in recognition of their support to the U.S. Special Forces during the Vietnam War. But since then, the newest immigrants have made their way to America because they were fleeing religious and political prosecution. TheMontagnard families live in two worlds: one that is still close to the traditions and ways of their homeland and the other in modern American society.

I Don't Do Boxes is a new LGBTQ magazine created by and for queer youth.
idontdoboxes.org

I Don't Do Boxes is a new magazine that explores and documents the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender experience in the southeast United States. The magazine was founded and edited by the youth-led media program QueerLab. Each issue is designed to provide a unique look at what it means to be queer in the South by tackling topics like identifying as LGBTQ in school or the power of documenting LGBTQ voices.

Black and white photo of band on couch.
thegenuinemusic.com

The Genuine is a four-piece band from Winston-Salem. The band originally began as a project of husband and wife Mathew Allivato and Katelyn Allivato née Brouwer, but now includes an electric guitar, piano and percussion. They are one of the many bands performing at Phuzz Phest in Winston-Salem April 17th -19th, and they will preview their festival performance with a live in-studio performance.

Echo Courts

Apr 10, 2015
Echo Courts plays in Winston-Salem at Phuzz Phest, April 17-19.
Echo Courts

Echo Courts is a five-member surf-rock band out of Greensboro, North Carolina. 

Their second EP, "Ice Cream Social," will have you reaching for your beach towel. But their melancholy lyrics are a contrast to their dreamy, summery sound. The band is playing at Phuzz Phest, a three-day music festival in Winston-Salem next weekend that features more than 60 national and local acts.

The State of Things is headed back to Greensboro's Triad Stage on April 14th for a live broadcast of the show. 

Here's a preview of what we'll be talking about on the show...

Publix is one company with an employee stock ownership plan.
Mike Kalasnik / Flickr Creative Commons

In many workplaces, "the boss" is a board or group of investors.

But in a growing number of businesses, employees are taking ownership. Some use an employee stock ownership plan, or ESOP, and others use a cooperative structure.

 For companies like Southwest and Publix Super Markets, employee engagement is critical because employees are the bosses. The structure can also offer tax incentives.

Headshot of North Carolina Native Rising Opera Star Jill Gardner
Jill Gardner

  North Carolina native and nationally-recognized opera singer Jill Gardner has been attracting attention for her strong vocal and acting talent.

She received her master’s in vocal performance at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and has performed in operas around the country, primarily in the title role of Giacomo Puccini’s “Tosca.” Gardner will be live in concert on Friday, March 20 as part of the Music Academy of North Carolina’s 6th Annual Vocal Festival at UNC-Greensboro School of Music, Theatre and Dance Recital Hall.

The City of Greensboro is welcoming police and the community to discuss their relationship tonight.

Greensboro Human Relations Executive Director Love Crossling organized of the event.  She says some neighborhoods are satisfied with their interactions with police officers.

“We have other pockets of the community where there is debate about whether or not there is a level of courtesy and respect and adherence to policy and procedure.”

KKK members take weapons from the back of a car prior to the shooting between them and members of the Workers Viewpoint Organization/Communist Workers Party on Nov. 3, 1979.
News & Record file photo

In 1979 a clash between white supremacist groups and protestors in Greensboro left five dead and 12 badly injured.   The incident gained national attention and over the past 36 years the city has undergone a number of programs to try and provide some reconciliation.  But a new move by the North Carolina Highway Advisory Marker Committee is drawing some controversy. 

Chemistry is a bar and club, with a dance floor, DJ, and weekly drag shows. Owners at this establishment, and others, say new proposed regulations are unnecessary and costly.
Drew Wofford

  Elected officials in Greensboro are working to create a security ordinance for entertainment venues.

Calls for new regulations came after several violent incidents at nightclubs in recent months.  Late last year, a man was stabbed in the neck at a lounge near UNC-Greensboro. Another person was killed when shots were exchanged outside of a downtown nightclub.

A picture of a homeless person sleeping on the street.
Franco Folini / Creative Commons

Dozens of people are waking up outside in Greensboro today.

A vigil was held last night to honor nine people who died in that city this year, while living in homelessness.

Michelle Kennedy is executive director at the Interactive Resource Center. She says that number might be higher.

“So it’s hard to ever really have an accurate number of how many people we've lost while experiencing homelessness in this city, or really any other city,” Kennedy says.

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