France

In One Wartime Moment, A Family Is Forever Changed

Oct 19, 2018
Courtesy of Abigail DeWitt

In occupied France, one sister travels to Paris to audition for a spot at a conservatory, while two others stay behind at the family home in Normandy. The D-Day invasion that leaves one of them dead and the others traumatized in their various ways shapes the entire family for multiple generations and across two continents. 

Four World War II veterans were honored with Legion of Honor awards at a Raleigh ceremony.  From left: Morton Jacobs of New Bern, John P. Irby, III of Raleigh, Robert C. Senter of Fuquay-Varina, and Salvatore Maiello of Fayetteville.
Jay Price / WUNC

The number of North Carolina veterans who fought in World War II is declining. But last week, four of them got an official thanks from a country they helped liberate.

Photo of the Benvenue grill in Rocky Mount
Dudley Marchi

The Tar Heel State might not be the first place one would expect to find French influence. In fact, most people associate early North Carolina with English influence.

But a new book by NC State professor Dudley Marchi explores the many connections between French culture and the Old North State.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Marchi about "FraNCe: The French Heritage of North Carolina."

A picture of the French Legion of Honor medal.
David Monniaux / Wikipedia

France is paying tribute to seven North Carolina veterans of World War II today in Raleigh.  The men will be presented with the French Legion of Honor.  

 Denis Barbet  is the Consul General of France in Atlanta.  He says the medal is his country's highest decoration. 

Ten veterans in North Carolina received France’s highest honor in a special ceremony yesterday. The French Consul General in Atlanta awarded the Legion of Honour to a group of World War Two veterans in a ceremony at the old state capitol building. The retired service members say they were lucky to survive a war that changed their lives forever.