Food Pantry

Children, Seniors Across NC Face High Rate Of Food Insecurity

Dec 16, 2019
Volunteers and clients organize morning food distribution on Nov. 16 at the food pantry at Camp United Methodist Church in Shallotte.
Melissa Sue Gerrits / Carolina Public Press

  

North Carolina ranks fifth in the nation for having the most seniors and children who don’t know where their next nutritional meal will come from as they grapple with food insecurity.

Read more at Carolina Public Press

canned food at food bank
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

The partial federal government shutdown has food bank operators nervous that they could lose food distributions from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Meanwhile, the families they serve could also lose food benefits.

Man unloads truck of canned food and produce.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Wake County Commission Chair Jessica Holmes understands kids who grow up not always knowing where they’ll find their next meal.

carrots and apples
Biser Todorov / Flickr

The Wake County Board of Commissioners and the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle have put a total of 10 food pantries in Raleigh high schools as of this year. The county helps pay operational costs while the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle provides non-perishable food and fresh produce.

Urban Ministries of Durham's food pantry, which serves community members in need, tends to face extra demand after storms or bad weather.
Reema Khrais / WUNC

More universities in North Carolina are opening food pantries on campus to help hungry students and faculty. 

N.C. Central University started giving out food to its students earlier this week.  It's one of at least eight colleges and universities in the state that have opened food pantries in the last two years. 

Jason O'Briant is a dietetics professor at N.C. Central and helped start the school's pantry.  He says the need for food on college campuses is higher than expected, even for students who receive room and board.
 

Urban Ministries of Durham's food pantry, which serves community members in need, tends to face extra demand after storms or bad weather.
Reema Khrais / WUNC

Thousands of North Carolina students are back in school after last week’s winter storm. But for many, the effects of the snow aren’t quite over. For low-income families, three to four days off of school can disrupt a tight budget, especially when their children rely on free or reduced lunches. 

Joyce Beavers, 32, takes care of four children who are all under the age of twelve. When she’s not at home, she works as a nurse’s aid making $7.25 an hour. She says she brings in less than $15-thousand dollars a year, and her husband is unemployed.