Environmental Justice

Rogers Road, Sewer, Environmental Justice, Orange County
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Orange County officials are reaching out to residents in the historic Rogers Road community to expedite sewer service. The historically African-American Rogers Road community has waited more than 40 years for water and sewer.

Rogers Road Neighborhood, OWASA, Landfills, Environmental Justice, Chapel Hill
Leoneda Inge

A 40-year old environmental justice situation that involved racial discrimination, broken promises and mistrust has finally been put to rest now that last sewer lines have been laid for the historically black Rogers Road neighborhood.

An Enviva wood pellet plant in Northampton, N.C.
Courtesy of Enviva

Burning wood pellets as a form of energy has been a growing trend since 2009 when the European Union deemed it carbon neutral and began to subsidize the conversion to this “greener” form of energy.

A map showing orange areas on the outskirts of Asheville, Charlotte, Winston-Salem, Durham, Raleigh, Fayetteville, Jaskconville and Wilmington.
Courtesy of Grady McCallie/North Carolina Conservation Network

North Carolina Conservation Network just released its first-ever “State of the Environment” report. It includes data analysis, polling and more than 100 indicators that measure the overall well-being of the environment and the people of North Carolina.

A picture of an American Robin.
Deja Perkins / NC State University

North Carolina State University researchers are seeking volunteers to help conduct a bird population survey in the Triangle's urban centers.

A hog waste lagoon in Beaufort County, NC.
DefMo / Flickr Creative Commons

Two weeks ago, 10 Bladen county residents were awarded $5 million each in punitive damages after winning a hog nuisance lawsuit against Murphy-Brown/Smithfield Foods. This week U.S. District Judge Earl Britt severely cut the award. Instead of the millions they were expecting, the plaintiffs will each get only $250,000.

Catherine Coleman Flowers

Lowndes County, Alabama covers more than 700 square miles in the south-central portion of the state. It is part of the Black Belt, a region with dense soil that was once the site of thriving cotton plantations. The area declined rapidly during industrialization, and the chalky, clay soil that was once the key to thriving cotton fields, became a disaster for sewage systems. To this day, large swaths of Lowndes County residents have either inadequate or no septic system, which leads to a wide range of environmental and public health issues.

Marc Edwards has been named among the most influential people in the world by Time, Fortune, Politico, and Foreign Policy Magazine. Edwards is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Virginia Tech, and he blew the whistle on the water crisis in Flint, Mich.

Come Hell or High Water follows Derrick Evans in his fight to preserve his community's home in coastal Mississippi.
Leah Mahan

    

When the city of Gulfport, Mississippi made plans to bulldoze the graves of former slaves, teacher-turned-advocate Derrick Evans fought to stop it.