Early Voting

A Pittsboro polling place with scattered individuals and a thicket of political signage.
Peyton Sickles / for WUNC

Election Day has arrived. North Carolinians must visit the polls today or turn in their absentee ballots to get their votes cast in the 2020 election. How will the day go for those voting in person? 

A group of people kneeling in front of a building with columns
Rusty Jacobs/WUNC

Law enforcement officers pepper sprayed peaceful protesters in Alamance County this weekend on the last day of early voting. The group of about 150 people were participating in a “Legacy March to the Polls” in downtown Graham that included a stop at the controversial Confederate monument there and a plan to march two blocks to an early voting site. 

Voters line up at the Alamance County Annex Building, a polling site in Graham, NC. Saturday was the final day of North Carolina's early voting period.
Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

The mood at an Alamance County polling site in Graham on Saturday was fairly festive. It was a mild and sunny Halloween. Volunteers at a table set up by Down Home North Carolina offered voters coffee, donuts and safety kits with gloves and masks.

Lakewood Elementary's Community Schools Coordinator Anna Grant greets families and offers voting information at the school's drive thru Fall Fest event on Oct. 31, 2020.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Early voting has concluded – and more than 4.5 million people have already cast ballots in North Carolina.

At least 4 million North Carolina voters won't be at the polls next Tuesday because they've already cast their ballots. And the U.S. Supreme Court ruled this week officials can keep counting mail-in ballots for nine days after Election Day. 

Becki Gray of the John Locke Foundation and Rob Schofield of NC Policy Watch join host Jeff Tiberii to weigh in on what the high court had to say, how huge the huge turnout will ultimately be, and whether or not we'll see North Carolina voters split the ticket again. 
 


Young voters, ages 18 to 30, are coming out in big numbers in the lead-up to Election Day. North Carolina ranks in the top states for early ballots cast by young voters, as Millennials and Generation Z look to make their voices heard this election season.

Host Leoneda Inge talks with young voters about their motivations to mobilize their peers. We also hear from David McLennan, political science professor at Meredith College, and Chavi Khanna Koneru, executive director of North Carolina Asian Americans Together, about the influence of young voters this election.
 


Courtesy Heather Leja

Updated at 6 p.m.

On Friday afternoon, Superior Court Judge Edwin Wilson granted a temporary restraining order mandating that an early voting site in Reidsville reopen on Saturday from 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. The site was closed for several hours on Monday.

A roll of stickers with an American flag and the words 'I Voted' and 'Yo Vote.'
GPA Photo Archive/Flickr/CC

North Carolina has a history of split-ticket voting. In 2016, the state voted in a Republican president — but put a Democrat in the governor’s seat. The same thing happened in 2004, with George W. Bush for president and Mike Easley for governor. 

One week to go before Election Day 2020 and the votes continue to pour in by the millions. Behind every ballot cast is a voter wielding the pen and filling in the bubbles for who they want to see in office.

On this episode of the Politics Podcast, we hear from a handful of voters across the battleground state of North Carolina about what’s on their minds. Host Jeff Tiberii also talks with WUNC politics reporter Rusty Jacobs about Granville County and why it's a region to keep a close eye on this election.
 


This week: North Carolina voters turned out in record numbers for the start of in-person early voting. Lines were made longer by social distancing — the polls are open as cases of COVID-19 across the state are surging. 

Democratic strategist Aisha Dew and Republican Clark Reimer join host Jeff Tiberii to offer some insight into those developments, as well as a confrontational gubernatorial debate between incumbent Gov. Roy Cooper and challenger Lt. Gov. Dan Forest. 
 


Military personnel have been voting by mail since the Civil War. This year, some polls suggest that troops' political preferences may be changing.

Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Updated at 3:20 p.m.  

Long lines formed at polling places across North Carolina on Thursday as the battleground state kicked off early in-person voting. Early voting locations that opened in all 100 counties of the high-stakes swing state quickly drew crowds. More than 500,000 people have already cast mail-in absentee ballots amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Natalie Dudas-Thomas / WUNC

WUNC has all the coverage you need this election season. Check out our 2020 Voter Guide for information on absentee ballots and more. And be sure to check out our Races To Watch stories for everything you need to know about candidates in statewide and legislative elections. Subscribe to WUNC's Politics Podcast, and follow reporters Rusty Jacobs and Jeff Tiberii on Twitter.

The North Carolina General Assembly recently enacted legislation to ease absentee-by-mail voting this year and to make polls safer for in-person voting during the coronavirus pandemic.

Voters fill out their ballots at the Hamilton County Board of Elections as early voting begins statewide, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / ASSOCIATED PRESS

The North Carolina State Board of Elections voted along party lines Monday to back plans for early voting on Sundays in some counties.

next gen america
Rachel Weber / Next Gen America

Registering to vote is usually an interactive, interpersonal effort, where organizations host registration events at college campuses or churches. But in the time of pandemic, it's changed the way nonprofit organization are reaching potential voters.

Leoneda Inge / WUNC

More than 1 million North Carolina residents have registered, or re-registered, to vote since the 2016 election. A lot of the new voters are young - and are more than twice as likely to identify as Latinx or Asian than in previous elections.

A sign indicates a no-student drop-off zone with Wake County public school buses in the background.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

A school district in North Carolina has been busing students to polling place so they can vote, register to vote or just to have a look.

After three days of one-stop, early voting, which started on Thursday, the number of accepted ballots cast in Democratic primaries is 44,189, over 13,000 more than the 30,539 Republican primary ballots. 

NC A&T students filled the commission chamber of the Old Guilford County Courthouse to ask that their campus be an early voting site next year.
Courtesy of Ivan Saul Cutler

North Carolina’s Board of Elections will consider using North Carolina A&T University as an early voting site for the 2020 primary elections after demands from its students and faculty.

Early in-person voting is starting for two special congressional elections in North Carolina.

Fayetteville State University's marching band kicks off the early vote event with President Bill Clinton at the university in Fayetteville, North Carolina.
Rishika Dugyala / Medill News Service

Data from the first week of early voting show North Carolinians are turning out in unprecedented numbers.

So far, of the state's 7 million registered voters, more than 400,000 have cast early ballots at the polls and almost just as many have requested mail-in ballots.

Voter stickers
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

North Carolina might yet play a role in what some have predicted will become a blue wave.

The latest election fundraising totals show that Democrats in two North Carolina Congressional battlegrounds have fared well.

The General Assembly passed a bill today that would change early voting times. Democrats say the bill that has been touted by Republicans as a measure to expand early voting, could actually make it harder for some to vote.

Photo: 'Vote Here' sign in English and Spanish
Erik Hersman / Flickr

Republican lawmakers are looking again at changing the rules on early voting, a popular idea which has prompted legal action.

a vote here sign in Carrboro
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

The gates are opening wider for North Carolina voters to cast ballots for next month's primary elections.

The congregation at New Light Missionary Baptist Church in Greensboro, NC took part of an initiative called Souls to the Polls that sought to increase African-American voter turnout in the 2016 general election.
Katie Stephens / WUNC

The battle for votes is in full swing this last week of early voting across North Carolina. Social justice and voting rights groups have been working especially hard to get African Americans to the polls. They say the demographic group holds the key to who wins on November 8th.

Jess Clark / WUNC

Early voting is off to a fast start in many North Carolina counties. As of Sunday, 408,906 voters had cast a ballot in North Carolina, according to the State Board of Elections.

NC A&T, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, Black Voters
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Numbers have consistently shown black voters to overwhelmingly support Barack Obama. And at Tuesday's rally in Greensboro, one would have thought he was running for a third term as President.

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

Following a three year battle over ballot access, voting activists are content with where things stand a few weeks prior to the start of early voting. Last week, the State Board of Elections reached compromises on more than 30 county disputes over the scope of early voting. It is the latest moment in a long legislative and legal saga.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, Frank Stasio talks with Jeff Tiberii about the 12-hour meeting held by the State Board of Elections on Thursday.

It was a remarkable meeting that considered and frequently altered the county-level early voting plans that were in dispute. These decisions will play a direct role in how the races for president, governor, senate – anyone on the ballot – plays out this fall.

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