Dan Bishop

U.S. Capitol building in Washington D.C.
Liam James Doyle / NPR

Two Republicans who triumphed in North Carolina special elections are set to join the House on Tuesday, including one whose narrow win showed anew that suburban voters are deserting the GOP while rural residents are embracing the party.

North Carolina 9th district Republican congressional candidate Dan Bishop waits to speak by phone with President Trump at his victory party in Monroe, N.C., Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019.
Nell Redmond / AP

Conservative Republican Dan Bishop won a special election Tuesday for an open House seat in North Carolina, averting a demoralizing Democratic capture of a district the GOP has held for nearly six decades.

President Donald Trump, left, gives his support to Dan Bishop, right, a Republican running for the special North Carolina 9th District U.S. Congressional race as he speaks at a rally in Fayetteville, N.C., Monday, Sept. 9, 2019.
Chris Seward / AP

Updated Sept. 10 at 8:50  a.m.

President Trump held a rally in Fayetteville last night to give a last-minute boost to Dan Bishop -- the Republican candidate in today's 9th Congressional District special election.

Angela Hsieh / NPR

The two Dans running for North Carolina's 9th Congressional District faced off last night in their only face-to-face debate, aired on WBTV in Charlotte. It was a heated battle between a moderate Democrat and a staunch Republican supporter of the president.

Dan McCready at a campaign event in Wadesboro.
McCready For Congress / Twitter

The Democrat in a North Carolina U.S. House special election ordered after a ballot-collection scandal has a big financial lead over his Republican rival in the race to represent a GOP-leaning district.

 In this May 7, 2019, photo, Dan Bishop answers a question during a debate among Republican candidates for the 9th Congressional District, in Monroe, N.C.
Chuck Burton / AP

State Sen. Dan Bishop (R-Mecklenburg) beat out nine other candidates in Tuesday's Republican primary in North Carolina's 9th Congressional District.

Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Republicans in the House are moving forward with their version of the state budget. Teachers and supporters who took to the streets in protest over funding were disappointed that the proposal did not meet their demands. Gov. Roy Cooper was also left wanting; now questions have arisen over whether he would veto a budget that does not provide for Medicaid expansion. 

Allison Dahle
Allison Dahle for NC House

With no statewide race on the ballot, this year’s North Carolina primary a relatively sleepy affair that drew light voter turnout statewide. But several state House and Senate races ended up raising eyebrows.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

This week on the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about the state budget, journalism and accusations of being a jihadist. Following spending proposals from the Governor, House, and Senate over the past few months, lawmakers passed a budget compromise this week. The $23 billion fiscal blueprint includes a $530 million tax cut, an average 3.3-percent raise for teachers, and a 1-percent pension bump for state retirees. Naturally Republicans are hailing the plan, while most Democrats contend the budget document doesn’t do enough for middle-class families and education.

Photo: Joaquín Carcaño, a 27-year-old transgender man, is a plaintiff in a lawsuit challenging North Carolina's bathroom law.
Jorge Valencia / WUNC

Two transgender people and a lesbian law professor filed a federal lawsuit on Monday challenging a new North Carolina law that requires public school students to use bathrooms assigned to their biological sex and blocks local governments from passing anti-discrimination rules.

The filing argues that the law violates the equal protection and due process clauses of the 14th Amendment, discriminating against certain groups because of their gender or orientation and threatening their personal safety.