COVID-19

Kevin Fuller
Naomi Prioleau / WUNC

Governor Roy Cooper's statewide stay-at-home order went into effect earlier this week. That presents a particular problem for the 9,000 North Carolinians who make up the state's homeless population.

Curbside sign reads: Please remain in your vehicle, we will be right with you.
Ben McKeown / WUNC

North Carolina is still in the early phase of its COVID-19 outbreak. The statewide case count jumped over the weekend, from 888 last Friday to about 1,500 confirmed COVID-19 cases Tuesday morning. 

Two boys reading on a couch with grandfather
Courtesy of Amy Scott

Homes across North Carolina are becoming workplaces, schools and daycares as families make plans to shelter in place for the next month.

Dawn Booker, Pack Light Global

Late last week, the U.S. State Department officially put a halt on international travel as we know it. It is recommending United States citizens stay home, amid this coronavirus pandemic.

The timing of that declaration meant I barely made it back from Morocco before its government suspended all international flights. I was travelling with a group of African American women on a once in a lifetime excursion.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Gov. Roy Cooper ordered North Carolinians to stay at home for thirty days starting 5 p.m. Monday, March 30. Healthcare providers worried about being overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients cheered his decision. Businesses not necessarily. 

Meanwhile, lawmakers this week began meeting, telephonically, to consider things like how to provide tax relief and get money to all the people who are suddenly out of work because of the coronavirus crisis. 

From a safe social distance, Rob Schofield of the progressive NC Policy Watch and Becki Gray of the conservative John Locke Foundation, weigh in. 
 


ThinkStock

 

The COVID-19 pandemic is having broad financial consequences, and college students are not immune to the effects.

Dalvin Nichols 8-Bit Photography

Dealing with the COVID-19 crisis means coping with feelings of fear, confusion and sadness. For musicians, it also means financial precarity as venues and festivals across the state continue to cancel or postpone.
 

Laura Pellicer / YouTube

 

Pollen: The scourge of spring. North Carolinians are all too familiar with the green and yellow stuff. Last year, olive green clouds of dense pollen hovered over Durham, N.C. making national headlines and making life miserable for seasonal allergy sufferers.

Allen G. Breed / AP Photo

It's a confusing time for getting even the smallest tasks done. Grocery stores continue to be open in the Triangle. So, too, are pharmacies and many big box stores. But how do you navigate a trip through the aisles while observing social distancing and avoiding the spread of the coronavirus?

Jared Weber / Carolina Connection

How is the coronavirus pandemic changing your life? North Carolinians share their stories of how this outbreak is affecting all facets of their calendar day, from canceled weddings to closed businesses to concerns about elderly relatives and neighbors. 

Baric Lab
UNC-Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health / UNC-CH

Labs across the world are scrambling to develop a vaccine for COVID-19. But just as important is a more immediate treatment. The treatment the World Health Organization has classified as the most promising is coming out of a lab at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health.

Amia Byrd, 7, looks at the book Rapunzel in the children's section at the Richard B. Harrison Community Library on July 9, 2018.
Madeline Gray / For WUNC

Families across North Carolina are adjusting to a new way of life — and of learning. 

Pixabay

Confirmed COVID-19 cases are concentrated in North Carolina’s urban centers up to now, but more rural areas are also feeling the economic and social ripples of the coronavirus pandemic. In North Carolina’s poorest county, the threat of economic recession looms greater than the disease itself. 

UNC Hospital
Jay Price / WUNC

It's an odd moment for the people who work in North Carolina healthcare. They read the reports of what is happening in Italy, South Korea and China, where hospitals in the worst-hit areas have been swamped with patients and in some cases reportedly overwhelmed.

Coronavirus Live Updates: Week Of March 9

Mar 13, 2020
Transmission electron microscopic image of an isolate from the first U.S. case of COVID-19. The spherical viral particles, colorized blue, contain cross-section through the viral genome, seen as black dots.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

This post will be updated periodically with the latest information on how the coronavirus is affecting North Carolina. Scroll down for older updates.

4:58 p.m. - Gov. Roy Cooper issued an executive order Saturday afternoon to stop mass gatherings of more than 100 people across the state.

(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

How will the coronavirus pandemic affect voting? The public and the media are closely watching how incumbents respond to the crisis.

Josie Taris and Amanda Magnus / WUNC

The number of coronavirus cases in the United States is growing every day. The stock markets are crashing. Universities are moving classes online. The NBA, NHL and MLB have all postponed or canceled upcoming games.

Credit Alissa Eckert, MS, Dan Higgins, MAM / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

In an effort to contain the coronavirus outbreak, North Carolina is now in a state of emergency. Gov. Roy Cooper issued the declaration Tuesday, as increased testing better accounts for the rising number of confirmed cases in the state.

Veteran salutes other veterans
flickr.com

VA medical systems across the state have begun basic screening for COVID-19, the illness caused by coronavirus. 

Updated at 7:35 p.m. ET

Twenty-one people aboard the Grand Princess cruise ship off the coast of California have tested positive for the coronavirus disease COVID-19, Vice President Pence announced Friday.

The Grand Princess had been returning to San Francisco after a cruise to Hawaii and has been kept away from port while a small portion of the roughly 3,500 people on board are tested for the coronavirus.

An illustration created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows the structure of coronavirus. The illness caused by this virus has been named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
Alissa Eckert, MS, Dan Higgins, MAM / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Updated 10:32 a.m. March 6, 2020

A second person in North Carolina has tested positive for the coronavirus. 

This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reveals ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS / CDC

Updated at 9:02 a.m. 3/5/2020

 UNC-Chapel Hill is expanding university affiliated travel restrictions to Washington State, California and Japan as the coronavirus continues to spread.

Wikimedia Commons

North Carolina's first case of the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19)  was confirmed today. Yet the state's manufacturing and agriculture industries were struggling to cope with disturbances in their supply chain weeks ago.

Fred Sharples

North Carolina’s resistance to pandemic is not uniform. The Triangle and Charlotte each host an international airport and research hospitals; March Madness brings crowds to Greensboro; Wilmington receives cargo and personnel from overseas; and Asheville entertains tourists from around the world. Socioeconomic vulnerability also contributes to the spread.