Cherokee County

Illustration of a downtown street.
Courtesy of UNC Libraries

He personally put up the barricades to keep visitors out in order to protect his mountain hometown from the coronavirus. But James Reid remembers when the problem was folks no longer stopping through Andrews. 

Picture of the Cherokee County courthouse
Frank Taylor / Carolina Public Press

For more than a decade, Cherokee County Department of Social Services (DSS) workers took children from their parents with no judicial oversight, using a fraudulent document called a Custody and Visitation Agreement, or CVA.

The Hungry Of Western North Carolina

Jun 19, 2019
Swain County in Western North Carolina ranks 99th out of the state's 100 counties for food security.
Matt Rose / Carolina Public Press

Carolina Public Press is taking a year-long look at hunger and food insecurity in Western North Carolina. “The Faces of Hunger” addresses many widely publicized facets of the problem, including its impact on the elderly and low-income children will also expose some of the not-so-common victims.

Image of Cherokee County Courthouse
J. Stephen Conn / Flickr, Creative Commons

For years, the Cherokee County Department of Social Services illegally removed dozens, and potentially even hundreds, of children from their homes. Instead of seeking an official court order from a judge, DSS workers instead instructed numerous families to sign custody and visitation agreements (CVAs) to authorize removal of their children.

photo of the Cherokee County Detention Center
Frank Taylor/Carolina Public Press

A former Cherokee County Detention Center officer has been indicted on assault charges after allegedly kicking an inmate in the face. This is one of a growing number of complaints against authorities at that detention center.

photo of brian hogan on the front steps of his home
Kathy Kmonicek / AP Photo

According to a report by The Associated Press, the Cherokee Department of Social Services has been systematically and illegally removing children from their homes for years. The actions may have started more than a decade ago and affect at least 100 families.