Brett Kavanaugh

U.S. Capitol building in Washginton, D.C.
Liam James Doyle / NPR

The Senate is expected to vote Saturday on the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh and — barring a major unforeseen development — in all likelihood, he will be confirmed by the narrowest of margins.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018.
Win McNamee / Pool Photo via AP

Senator Susan Collins (R-ME), is speaking on the floor of the US Senate today.

She's talking about her position on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

a poster of Brett Kavanaugh that says "Kava Nope" in front of the Supreme Court Building in D.C.
(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) / AP

Millions of Americans were glued to their screens last Thursday when Dr. Christine Blasey Ford told her story of sexual assault to the Senate Judiciary Committee and an angry Brett Kavanaugh defended his name against the allegations. A similar battle played out more than two decades ago during the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings.

AP Photo/Eric Risberg

The man once known fondly as “America’s Dad” now faces three to 10 years in state prison. 81-year-old Bill Cosby was sentenced last week for drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand, one of more than 60 women who has come forward with assault allegations against Cosby.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018.
Win McNamee / Pool Photo via AP

North Carolina Democrats want to capitalize on anger over the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation process and allegations he sexually assaulted Dr. Christine Blasey Ford when the two were high school students in the 1980s.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

The Senate Judiciary Committee is voting on Judge Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination.

A full Senate vote on the nomination is expected as early next week. Watch the proceeding live starting at 1:30 p.m.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh and the woman who has accused him of sexually assaulting her in high school, Christine Blasey Ford, are testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Watch the proceeding live starting at 10 a.m. ET.

Brett Kavanaugh
Jacquelyn Martin / AP Photo

Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s future on the U.S. Supreme Court is in flux after an allegation of physical and sexual assault. 

Jacquelyn Martin / AP Photo

Senate confirmation hearings for Judge Brett Kavanaugh continue this week, and many have described them as a circus. Angry protesters repeatedly disrupted proceedings and were dragged out of the hearings. And Democrats themselves protested on the first day that they did not have sufficient time to review more than 40,000 pages of documents they received hours before the hearings were set to begin. 

Elizabeth Allen for NPR

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is set to face a second round of questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday.

He's expected to be questioned about his views on previous Supreme Court cases, as well as a range of policy issues. Kavanaugh is also likely to be questioned about his work on Ken Starr's independent counsel investigation of former President Bill Clinton, and his time working in the White House under former President George W. Bush.

The hearing is expected to begin at 9:30 a.m. ET.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

President Donald Trump is in the United Kingdom for a two-day visit with British leaders. The visit turned awkward after the president blasted U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May in the press one day before the two were set to meet. He told a British tabloid that May ignored his advice on Brexit and that her political rival Boris Johnson would make an excellent prime minister.