Balance Of NC Congressional Delegation Remains Steady

Nov 7, 2018

Rep. Ted Budd, R-NC, answers questions from the media at his election party in Bermuda Run, N.C., Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, after voting in the state ended. Voters re-elected Budd to the House, defeating Democratic challenger Kathy Manning.
Credit Woody Marshall / AP

North Carolina’s Congressional delegation will continue to be made up by 10 Republicans and 3 Democrats. Though races in the 2nd, 9th, and 13th Districts were close, the Republican candidates in each district won at the end of the night.

Incumbent George Holding defeated Democratic contender Linda Coleman in the 2nd District. Shortly after midnight, Holding received a call from his opponent after she conceded.

“No harsh words. She wants to serve her community, just like how I want to serve my community. So it’s no hard feelings,” Holding said.

In the 13th District, Republican Congressman Ted Budd kept his seat from Democratic candidate Kathy Manning. Budd, a gun store owner, won his first-term seat comfortably in 2016. But this midterm race against Manning, a lawyer and community fundraiser, was much tighter. It even drew attention from President Trump.

The 9th District was the costliest race, which became an open seat when former minister Mark Harris beat Republican incumbent Robert Pittenger in the primaries. Dan McCready, a veteran and businessman, ran against him. The 9th District runs along the southern border of Charlotte and into Fayetteville. McCready received support from the national Democratic Party and ran a centrist campaign. Harris leads by a single percentage point. It’s not clear whether a recount will happen.

All Democratic incumbents won re-election on Tuesday. G.K. Butterfield in the 1st District won with 70 percent of the vote against Roger Allison. David Price in the 4th District, and Alma Adams in the 12th won with over 70 percent of the vote.