Krishnadev Calamur

Krishnadev Calamur is NPR's deputy Washington editor. In this role, he helps oversee planning of the Washington desk's news coverage. He also edits NPR's Supreme Court coverage. Previously, Calamur was an editor and staff writer at The Atlantic. This is his second stint at NPR, having previously worked on NPR's website from 2008-15. Calamur received an M.A. in journalism from the University of Missouri.

Pete Rose, baseball's all-time hits leader, bet on Cincinnati Reds games in 1986, during his last season as an active player, ESPN's Outside the Lines reports.

Items recovered from a hunting cabin in rural New York could be linked to the two convicted killers who escaped from prison more than two weeks ago, police said Monday.

"We have recovered specific items from that cabin," State Police Maj. Charles Guess said at a news conference. "We have forwarded them to the appropriate laboratories and reached conclusive determination but are not prepared to release that evidence at this time."

Greece's finance minister says European leaders have, in principle, accepted a new proposal from Athens that could pave the way for another installment of a multibillion-dollar bailout. The move could stave off a Greek default on its debt obligations and avert an exit from the eurozone — at least for now.

Brian Williams won't return to the anchor's chair at NBC Nightly News. Williams is being replaced by Lester Holt, the broadcast's interim anchor, four months after being suspended for misrepresenting his experiences covering the war in Iraq, NBC said Thursday in a statement.

Williams will return to MSNBC, where he was an anchor from 1996 to 2004. There, he will anchor breaking news and special reports, the network said. He will begin his new role in mid-August.

Updated at 5:29 p.m. ET

Dylann Roof, the 21-year-old man arrested in connection with the deadly shooting at one of Charleston, S.C.'s oldest historically black churches, had previously been in trouble with authorities. He was arrested twice recently — once on suspicion of drug possession and another time for trespassing.

Updated at 1:49 p.m. ET

Bruce Jenner, the former Olympic gold-medal-winning decathlete who revealed recently that "for all intents and purposes" he is a woman, is now Caitlyn Jenner.

The revelation was made in Vanity Fair, which tweeted an image of Jenner on the cover of its July issue.

In the latest case of public figures confusing The Onion for fact, we give you Jack Warner.

Last month, a woman dropped off boxes of electronics to a recycling firm in Silicon Valley; among its contents: a vintage Apple I.

Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak and Ron Wayne put together some 200 Apple I desktops in 1976 — and the machines are prized. The one in Silicon Valley, for instance, sold for $200,000, the San Jose Mercury News reports.

The world's governments are meeting today in Bonn, Germany, to work on a U.N. agreement to tackle climate change, a day after European energy companies urged them to adopt a pricing system for carbon emissions.

NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce, who is reporting on the story for our Newscast unit, says the meeting in Bonn is part of the run-up to a major climate summit being held in Paris at the end of the year. Here's more from Nell:

Authorities in Bangladesh have charged more than 40 people with murder in connection with the 2013 collapse of the Rana Plaza complex — the country's worst industrial accident. More than 1,100 people died and 2,500 others were injured. Among those charged is Sohel Rana, the man who owned the complex.

The weather forecast for Texas is sunshine, just a week after flooding in the state killed at least 25 people and prompted President Obama to declare a disaster in the state.

Lauren Silverman of member station KERA tells our Newscast unit:

"Torrential rains have given Texas the wettest May in history. The National Weather Service says, in all, more than 37 trillion gallons of water have fallen in the state. Flooding ... swept away thousands of vehicles and trapped people in their cars and houses.

The Pentagon says 24 laboratories in 11 states and two foreign countries received samples of live anthrax that were accidentally shipped by the Defense Department.

Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert was paying a man to not reveal that Hastert had abused him years ago, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times are reporting.

Ross Ulbricht, the San Francisco man who created Silk Road, was sentenced Friday to life in prison for his role in operating the shadowy online marketplace.

Ulbricht faced at least 20 years in prison, but federal prosecutors had sought a "substantially" longer sentence.

Actor Tracy Morgan has settled his lawsuit against Wal-Mart over a deadly highway crash last year involving a Wal-Mart truck that left the comedian seriously hurt.

The Associated Press reports:

"A filing in federal court in Newark on Wednesday referred to a confidential settlement reached by the two sides.

"Morgan's lawyer, Benedict Morelli, said he and Walmart worked diligently to reach the settlement for the plaintiffs and their families.

A Danish radio station says a host who killed a 9-week-old rabbit during a live debate on animal welfare and later cooked and ate it wanted to "stir a debate about the hypocrisy when it comes to perceptions of cruelty towards animals." But not everyone is buying that argument amid demands for Asger Juhl, the host, to be fired for "shameless self-promotion."

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

Republican Rick Santorum, the former senator from Pennsylvania, announced Wednesday that he is running for president.

"Working families don't need another president tied to big government or big money," he said in Cabot, Pa.. "And today is the day we're going to begin to fight back."

Two research chimps got their day in court — though they weren't actually present in the courtroom.

Steven Wise, an attorney with the Nonhuman Rights Project, told Manhattan Supreme Court Judge Barbara Jaffe that Hercules and Leo, the 8-year-old research chimps at Stony Brook University on Long Island, are "autonomous and self-determining beings" who should be granted a writ of habeas corpus, which would effectively recognize them as legal persons. The chimps, he argued, should be moved from the university to a sanctuary in Florida.

Updated at 5:52 p.m. ET

Lawmakers in Nebraska overrode Gov. Pete Ricketts' veto of their vote to repeal the death penalty, making it the first Republican-controlled state in the U.S. to repeal the death penalty since North Dakota in 1973. The vote was 30-19.

Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts vetoed legislation passed last week that repealed the state's death penalty.

"Please sustain my veto. Please stand with the citizens of Nebraska and law enforcement for public safety," he said, flanked by law enforcement personnel, murder victims' family members and state lawmakers who support capital punishment.

More than 750 people are dead in India in a heat wave that has seen temperatures in some parts of the country touching 118 degrees.

Most of the deaths have occurred in southern Andhra Pradesh and Telangana states. The Associated Press reports that more than 550 people have died in Andhra Pradesh since May 13; the number is 215 in Telangana since April 15. Indian news sites say the toll has exceeded 1,000.

The IRS says criminals gained access to the accounts of more than 100,000 taxpayers through its online service Get Transcript. The data stolen included taxpayers' Social Security information, when they were born and their street addresses.

At a news conference, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said criminals made about 200,000 attempts to access tax information; 100,000 of those attempts, made from February to mid-May, were successful.

Mary Ellen Mark, the influential photographer known mostly for her humanist work, has died. She was 75.

Mark died Monday, a representative said Tuesday. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that she died in New York.

Mark's work appeared in Life, New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair. Her photo essay on runaway children in Seattle became the basis of Streetwise, an Academy Award-nominated film that was directed by her husband, Martin Bell.

The Chicago Bears released defensive end Ray McDonald Monday after he was arrested on charges of domestic violence in California — his second arrest in the past nine months.

The Chicago Tribune adds:

"McDonald was arrested for misdemeanor domestic violence and child endangerment, the Santa Clara, Calif., police department said. It's the second time since Aug. 31 that he's been arrested as a result of women claiming he assaulted them.

Charter Communications, the No. 4 U.S. cable company, is reportedly close to buying Time Warner Cable, the nation's second-largest, for $55 billion, Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times are reporting.

Americans are paying tribute today, Memorial Day, to the sacrifices of service members in the nation's earliest conflicts and the newest.

President Obama laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery, just outside Washington.

Some 5,000 people were at the grounds of the cemetery, which Obama called "more than a final resting place for fallen heroes." It is, he said, "a reflection of America itself. A reflection of our history, the wars we've waged for democracy, the peace we've laid to preserve it.

Updated at 1:04 p.m. ET

Iraq and Iran are refuting U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter's assertion that Iraqi forces lacked the "will to fight" the self-declared Islamic State, resulting in the loss last week of Anbar Province and its capital, Ramadi.

Saad al-Hadithi, a spokesman for Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, told The Associated Press that Ramadi's loss was due to mismanagement and poor planning by some senior military commanders.

Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, who as recently as 2009 led his country, was sentenced Monday by a Jerusalem court to eight months in prison for unlawfully accepting money from a U.S. supporter.

As we reported in March when Olmert was convicted in the case:

Updated at 4:41 p.m. ET

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is calling the flood damage in the central part of his state "absolutely devastating."

Abbott flew over parts of the Blanco River Monday, a day after storms triggered flooding. The hardest-hit communities were Wimberley and San Marcos. Abbott added 24 counties to the disaster declaration he issued earlier this month to help communities overwhelmed with heavy rains and tornado damage.

The high water forced Peggy Wilborn — and her neighbors — from their homes in Wimberley.

TLC has pulled 19 Kids and Counting, the reality show featuring Jim Bob and Michelle Duggar's family, from its schedule amid reports of sexual misconduct against John Duggar, their oldest son, when he was 15.

Here's TLC's statement:

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