Krishnadev Calamur

Krishnadev Calamur is NPR's deputy Washington editor. In this role, he helps oversee planning of the Washington desk's news coverage. He also edits NPR's Supreme Court coverage. Previously, Calamur was an editor and staff writer at The Atlantic. This is his second stint at NPR, having previously worked on NPR's website from 2008-15. Calamur received an M.A. in journalism from the University of Missouri.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel's attempt to explain her country's asylum policy to a young Palestinian whose family is close to deportation reduced the girl to tears.

Tributes are pouring in for Marlene Sanders, the television news pioneer who died Tuesday at the age of 84.

NPR's Susan Stamberg tells our Newscast unit:

Here's what we know: Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were executed in 1953 for selling U.S. nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union after one of the most sensational Cold War-era espionage trials. They were convicted in 1951 owing, largely, to the testimony of David Greenglass, Ethel Rosenberg's brother.

Here's what we don't know: How credible Greenglass' testimony was in court.

President Obama says there's "no precedent" to revoke the Presidential Medal of Freedom for comedian Bill Cosby, who has been accused by several women of sexually assaulting them.

"There's no precedent for revoking the medal," Obama said at a news conference today. "We don't have that mechanism."

Cosby was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2002 for his contributions to television.

Here are Obama's full comments on the allegations against Cosby:

Updated at 7:42 p.m. ET

Greece's Parliament approved the controversial austerity measures struck Monday with the country's creditors, but the vote created a rift within the ruling left-wing Syriza party.

"We don't believe in it, but we are forced to adopt it," Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras appealed to lawmakers before the vote.

The vote was 229-64, with six abstentions. Thirty-two of the "no" votes came from Syriza lawmakers; six of them voted present. Also voting "no" were members of the far-right Golden Dawn.

This post was last updated at 2:54 p.m. ET

President Obama offered a robust defense of the historic deal struck with Iran on its nuclear program, saying it meets the "national security interests of the United States and its allies."

In a more than hourlong news conference, Obama dismissed criticism of the deal, acknowledging that he expects "robust" debate over the agreement in Congress, but urging lawmakers to evaluate "this agreement based on the facts, not on politics, not on posturing."

The Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art in Washington will post a sign Wednesday telling visitors an exhibition that includes art owned by Bill Cosby and his wife, Camille, is "fundamentally about the artworks and the artists who created them, not Mr. Cosby," representatives for the Smithsonian Institution say.

The families of three Americans imprisoned in Iran and the wife of a former FBI agent who vanished in the country in 2007 have said they hope the historic deal the U.S. and five other world powers struck with Iran over its nuclear program will see the men released.

Amir Hekmati

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

Reaction in the Middle East to the historic agreement that the U.S. and its five allies struck with Iran on its nuclear program has been mixed.

In Israel, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's reaction was, as expected, highly critical.

The Pentagon is examining the implications of allowing transgender people to openly serve in the military, Defense Secretary Ash Carter said today.

The executive committee of the Boy Scouts of America has unanimously adopted a resolution that would allow gay adults to serve as Scout leaders, ending a longstanding ban on gay leaders in the organization.

Jason Rezaian, The Washington Post reporter jailed in Iran, faced his third hearing Monday at a closed-door session in the Revolutionary Court.

Updated at 1:11 p.m. ET

President Obama has commuted the sentences of 46 mostly nonviolent drug offenders, nearly all of whom, the White House says, would have already served their time if they were convicted of the same crime today.

The American Psychological Association has apologized for actions that may have enabled brutal interrogation techniques used by the U.S. government after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

NPR's Jon Hamilton, who is reporting on the story for our Newscast unit, says the apology comes in response to an independent report commissioned by the APA itself. He says:

Updated at 7:14 p.m. ET

Reddit interim CEO Ellen Pao has resigned from the company in the wake of an insurrection last week in which moderators shut down many of the site's most popular sections following the still-unexplained dismissal of a popular figure in the site's r/IAmA section.

The defense for James Holmes, accused of the Aurora, Colo., theater shooting, has rested after trying to prove he was insane at the time of the 2012 attack that killed 12 people and injured 70.

Holmes' attorneys had argued their client was in the midst of a psychotic episode at the time of the July 20, 2012, incident.

Two psychiatrists who testified for the defense said Holmes was insane, but court-appointed doctors testified Holmes knew the difference between right and wrong. The Associated Press adds:

Victoria Taylor, famous for her role in Reddit's popular r/IAmA section, has broken the silence over her dismissal that prompted an insurrection last week in which moderators shut down many of the site's most popular sections.

Posting on Reddit, Taylor thanked those who rallied to her defense, calling the response "extraordinary."

India's Supreme Court has ordered a federal investigation into a multimillion-dollar job-recruitment scam and more than 30 deaths to which it has been linked.

The country's highest court ordered the Central Bureau of Investigation to take over the inquiry by police in central Madhya Pradesh state into what's known as the Vyapam scam. Here's the background to the scam from India's NDTV:

(This post was last updated at 4:48 p.m. ET.)

Just before the end of the day Thursday in Athens, the Greek government handed its European creditors a new bailout proposal.

A spokesman for Eurogroup President Jeroen Dijsselbloem tweeted that Greece's creditors would now consider the proposal.

FIFA has banned its former executive committee member Chuck Blazer from taking part in any aspect of soccer for life.

Medicare says that starting Jan. 1, 2016, it plans to pay doctors to counsel patients about end-of-life care.

Julie Rovner, senior correspondent with Kaiser Health News, tells our Newscast unit that many medical groups, including the American Medical Association, have long recommended the move.

JPMorgan Chase will pay $136 million in penalties to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and states to settle charges that it used illegal tactics to target delinquent credit card borrowers.

Here's what the CFPB says Chase did:

"The CFPB and states found that Chase sold 'zombie debts' to third-party debt buyers, which include accounts that were inaccurate, settled, discharged in bankruptcy, not owed, or otherwise not collectible."

Wednesday's computer-related problems on the New York Stock Exchange that halted trading for more than three hours was not a one-off.

A raid at the home of Subway pitchman Jared Fogle has led to both sides agreeing to suspend their relationship, and put a spotlight on Fogle's ties to the former head of a foundation he created to fight childhood obesity.

Federal and state authorities removed electronics from Fogle's home in suburban Indianapolis in a raid Tuesday, but refused to discuss the nature of the investigation. Fogle's attorney said he was cooperating, adding the Subway pitchman had not been arrested or charged with anything.

Malaysian authorities have frozen six bank accounts in connection with an investigation into nearly $700 million allegedly transferred into Prime Minister Najib Razak's bank accounts.

The Wall Street Journal, which reported last week on the alleged transfers, cited "a person aware of the probe" saying at least one of the frozen accounts belonged to Najib.

Jerry Weintraub, the legendary producer behind such hits as The Karate Kid and Ocean's Eleven, died Monday in Santa Barbara, Calif. He was 77.

The cause was cardiac arrest, according to Rogers & Cowan, the PR firm.

Weintraub began his career as a talent agent for MCA in the 1950s, representing clients such as Jack Paar. He then became a leading concert promoter, handling acts like Elvis Presley and Bob Dylan. His first production venture was Robert Altman's Nashville, which garnered five Academy Award nominations.

Updated at 7:10 p.m. ET

Comedian Bill Cosby testified in 2005 that he obtained the sedative Quaalude with the intent of giving the drug to women with whom he wanted to have sex, and he acknowledged giving it to at least one woman.

Updated at 5:26 p.m. ET

President Obama has warned that the campaign against the so-called Islamic State "will not be quick" as he cited gains made in Iraq and Syria by the coalition fighting the militant group.

"This will not be quick," Obama said at the Pentagon. "This is a long-term campaign."

Reddit CEO Ellen Pao has apologized to users of the popular website reddit, citing a "long history of mistakes" that resulted in an insurrection last week in which moderators shut down many of the site's most popular sections to protest the dismissal of a key figure in the site's popular r/IAmA section.

Here's part of Pao's apology that was posted on the site Monday:

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