Dave DeWitt

Feature News Editor/ Co-Host, "Tested" Podcast

Dave DeWitt is WUNC's Feature News Editor. As an editor, reporter, and producer he's covered politics, environment, education, sports, and a wide range of other topics.

Dave is also the founding host of "Tested," WUNC's first news podcast.

He has filed stories for NPR’s news magazines as well as Marketplace and Only A Game. He formerly worked in college athletics, college admissions, and with the Tar Heel Sports Network. In 2001, he wrote the non-fiction book "True Blue".

Ways to Connect

School's Out

Apr 24, 2020

Governor Roy Cooper today announced that public school facilities in North Carolina would stay closed through the end of the academic year. It came a day after he announced a three-stage plan to re-open the state, when specific benchmarks are reached.

Republican leaders pushed back against his stay-at-home order, even as the two parties have worked in a more bipartisan fashion behind the scenes in legislative committees.

We speak with Rose Hoban, the editor of North Carolina Health News, about what came out of those committees, and the ongoing challenges of getting information on the meat processing plant outbreaks in the state.


Today, Governor Roy Cooper extended his stay-at-home order until May 8. He also laid out a more specific, three-phase plan for re-opening North Carolina's economy.

In very simple terms, Cooper wants to see decreases or sustained leveling in four trends, twice as many tests conducted per day and twice as many people who can trace cases, and a larger supply of N-95 masks and gowns.

As benchmarks are hit, restrictions will be lifted. It's part of an effort to get the 700,000 or so North Carolinians who have filed for unemployment back to work.

Behind every number, of course, is a difficult or traumatic story. We talk with WUNC's Jeff Tiberii about how unemployed workers are getting by and how the state is trying to help.


Racial Disparities

Apr 22, 2020

About 21% of the people who live in North Carolina are African-American, but black people make up 39% of COVID-19 cases in the state - and 37% of the deaths.

These disparities did not begin with this pandemic. The racial differences in health care are well-documented by all manner of researchers, including those in the Department of Health and Human Services.

We speak with Benjamin Money, the Deputy Secretary for Health Services at DHHS about how COVID-19 has put a new focus on the longstanding problem of racial health disparities.


The South

Apr 21, 2020

Governor Roy Cooper says he is still weighing goals and will make a plan about what needs to happen before re-opening areas of the state.

Cooper's gubernatorial colleagues in the south are moving ahead, however, without similar considerations. Yesterday, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp said he was lifting restrictions across state within the next week on businesses from restaurants to hair salons to bowling alleys. Other governors in South Carolina and Tennessee are following suit.

Cooper is pointing specifically to testing; that we need to be able to do more than we can right now. Rose Hoban, the editor of North Carolina Health News, gives us an update on where North Carolina is with testing.
And we hear from a small-business owner who doesn't want to expose her customers to COVID-19, but she can’t stay closed much longer without help.


Critical Care

Apr 20, 2020

Bevin Strickland is a nurse and doctoral student a UNC Greensboro. She's 47 years old, and a single mother of three.

When the COVID-19 outbreak hit New York, Strickland immediately explored ways she could help. After looking to volunteer, her friend Eric suggested that she sign a two-month contract to work as a nurse at Mount Sinai Hospital in Queens.

WUNC reporter Liz Schlemmer has been talking to Strickland by video calls since she landed in New York City two weeks ago.

In this episode, Strickland explains what she's seeing and feeling, and she and Liz explore the importance of critical care in both of their lives.


To this point in the pandemic response, political partisanship hasn't been a major issue in North Carolina.

But that fight is likely to come. Soon.

Governor Roy Cooper is, of course, a Democrat. The state House and Senate are majority Republican. This is not news. It led, last summer, to a stalemate over the state budget.

While factions are developing over when to re-open the state's economy, the next big fight ahead will likely be over money. North Carolina has received about $2 billion in federal funds to deal with the pandemic, and another $2 billion is expected.

We speak with Rose Hoban, editor of North Carolina Health News, about how the General Assembly may choose to spend that money, and the role partisan politics may play in the weeks ahead. And we also take a virtual visit to the North Carolina Zoo.


The Peak

Apr 16, 2020

It's been the subject of intense research and modeling by renowned experts, and a favorite parlor game for the rest of us: When will we hit "The Peak?"

Even the best models disagree about when, where and how we’ll get there, or even how many "peaks" there might be, but the models are all we have as we start to think and plan for how to dial back social distancing.

We speak with Aaron McKethan, a senior fellow in the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy, and one of the researchers working on models in North Carolina.


The Youngest Generation

Apr 15, 2020

Years from now, our kids will likely write essays about this pandemic. Right now, some of those future high school and college kids are busy learning their ABCs at home. But if their parents are essential workers, they might still need to rely on their local child care facility - that is, if it's still open.

We talk with Donna White, the interim president of Smart Start, about how the child care system is trying to adapt to the pandemic, and how the structure of the program she runs made it susceptible to a global crisis.

Also, Dr. Kizzmekia Corbett, one of the leading National Institutes of Health scientists working to come up with a COVID-19 vaccination, has strong ties to the Triangle.


Vulnerability

Apr 14, 2020

The pandemic is exposing weaknesses and inequities throughout our society and systems. Some are simply annoying, like hackers jumping into our Zoom calls, but others have serious consequences, like employer-based health-care, when so many are losing jobs and need coverage more than ever.

When it comes to public health, the most vulnerable people are at the highest risk. But so are the systems that serve them.

Rose Hoban, editor of North Carolina Health News, explains why rural hospitals are at particular financial risk, and what that means for people living in those communities. Also, Duke professor Sandy Darity lays out the potential catastrophic level of African American unemployment.


The Week Ahead

Apr 13, 2020

The numbers for today are in, and they are both grim, and a little hopeful. As of Monday, 86 people have now died in North Carolina, but the number of hospitalizations has dropped by about 15% since Saturday.

Concerns are growing over COVID-19 outbreaks in nursing homes across the state, as facilities in Franklin, Chatham, and Orange counties report dramatic rises in cases.

In Dare County, they have a different problem: A burgeoning economic catastrophe related to the potential loss of tourist season. WUNC's Jay Price speaks with a county commissioner/restaurant owner about the current situation and preparations for the near future.

Also, student journalists at Riverside High School go to extraordinary efforts to publish the school paper in the midst of the pandemic.


Reporting

Apr 10, 2020

Today: Reporting.

Earlier this month, when Governor Roy Cooper issued his executive order that people stay-at-home, he listed out some essential businesses and operations that could continue.

The list included the obvious, like grocery stores and pharmacies. But the "essential" list also included car mechanics, hardware stores, and news media outlets. No one believes for a second that reporters are on-par with health-care workers or pharmacists on the list of most essential. But, access to verified, accurate information is important.

We speak about the essential nature of news with Rose Hoban, editor of North Carolina Health News, and we hear from WUNC's Jay Price about how a reporter manages risk, and how this pandemic is different from the war-zone reporting he has done in the past. 


Congregate Living

Apr 9, 2020

Even if the term is unfamiliar, the situation probably isn't. If you've ever lived in a college dormitory, you've been in a congregate living situation… where you live side-by-side with other people, maybe sharing bedrooms, bathrooms, kitchens, and various public spaces.

That term has taken on new importance now, especially in places like nursing homes. It's led Governor Roy Cooper to issue new rules.

As the numbers of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths continue to climb, so do the number of survivors. The Department of Health and Human Services is not providing statewide data on the number of people who have been treated and released from hospitals, but Dale Folwell is one of them. He's North Carolina's State Treasurer. Now in recovery, Folwell talks to WUNC's Jeff Tiberii.
 


State Vs Federal

Apr 8, 2020

In a conference call on March 16, President Donald Trump told governors it should try to get ventilators and other life-saving equipment on their own.

Three-and-a-half weeks later, states are competing against each other and against other countries for a limited supply of PPE, ventilators, and other vital tools in combating COVID-19.

We talk to Rose Hoban, editor of North Carolina Health News, about how that dynamic between the federal and state government is playing out in hospitals.


Predicting The Curve

Apr 7, 2020

Predicting how the COVID-19 pandemic will play out in North Carolina is a difficult task. Yesterday, some of the state's best minds from Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill, and RTI crunched the data and offered up their best prediction for what hospitals could expect.

Their message: We need to stay home for a longer period of time.

We talk with WUNC's Will Michaels. He spends most of his waking hours watching the numbers and the various models, and he explains the importance of yesterday's prediction.


Protection

Apr 6, 2020

Hospital administrators across North Carolina are planning for every scenario they might face during the COVID-19 outbreak. According to UNC Health officials, one of those contingency plans is what to do if half of their providers get sick with COVID-19.

A large-scale survey released today by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General is clear: The shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) that might keep that from happening is frightening.

We talk with Rose Hoban, the editor of North Carolina Health News, about the type of work health care providers administer in the pandemic, and how that puts them – and their families – at a unique level of risk.


Charlotte

Apr 3, 2020

North Carolina's largest city is also the first serious outbreak of COVID-19 in the state. Hospitalizations there are increasing rapidly, and officials are preparing to be overrun.

On Friday afternoon, Governor Roy Cooper made it clear that North Carolina, like every other state, is pretty much on its own, as the federal government has only fulfilled 33 percent of the requests for supplies and equipment, and told state officials not to expect anything more.

We take a look at what's happening in Charlotte and what it means for the rest of the state with Rose Hoban, the editor and founder of North Carolina Health News.


Stress

Apr 2, 2020

We all have a role to play in this pandemic. For the majority of us, it's to stay home, stay away from others, and do our best to manage our lives through the next few weeks of social distancing.

For some, unanswered questions are a cause of stress, but for others, the stress is more acute and focused - people who have loved ones who are sick, or those fighting the disease on the front lines, in hospitals across North Carolina.

We talk today with Shevaun Neupert. She's a professor of psychology at N.C. State University and researches stress. Neupert explains the difference between regular, everyday stress, and the chronic variety we are feeling now.


Models

Apr 1, 2020

It's hard to know what, exactly, to expect here. Is North Carolina going to be like New York? Or New Orleans? Will we see our hospitals overrun?

Or might we get to where the Bay Area is? Early and decisive actions seem to have made a difference there. As of now, hospitals in northern California are not overrun, and the curve there might just be flattening.

Today on Tested, we talk to Rose Hoban from North Carolina Health News about which states might serve as a bellwether for what North Carolina can expect, and she shines a light on some of the unsung heroes of the health care community.


Teaching And Learning

Mar 31, 2020

These are unprecedented times for school administrators, educators, students, and parents.

For so many, school is not just where classes take place, it's the primary social gathering place. And some things, like proms and graduations, will be lost forever.

On today's episode of Tested, we talk to WUNC's two education reporters, Cole del Charco and Liz Schlemmer, about the seismic shift at all levels of North Carolina's education system.


Numbers

Mar 30, 2020

On CNN over the weekend, Dr. Anthony Fauci brought up some frightening numbers, including that the country can expect 100,000-200,000 deaths due to COVID-19. Proportionally, that would mean between 3,000-6,000 people would die in North Carolina.

But right now, the most important number here is hospitalizations. DHHS puts that number at 137 currently, and it's very likely to go up. Way up.

We talk with Rose Hoban, the editor and founder of North Carolina Health News, about what numbers to watch, as well as the potential for a "bomb of infection" waiting to go off in the state's prisons and jails.


We're Number One

Mar 27, 2020

The United States has overtaken China, Italy, and every other country in the world in the number of documented COVID-19 cases. It's a dubious and troubling honor, to be sure. And it caps a week unlike any before it, around the globe and here in North Carolina.

On a day when Governor Roy Cooper issues a statewide stay-at-home order, host Dave DeWitt speaks Rose Hoban, editor of North Carolina Health News, about how we will know when the curve is starting to flatten in the state.


Treatment

Mar 26, 2020

Today: Treatment.

Duke University Hospital has announced it is part of the first national study of a drug the World Health Organization has called "the only drug right now that we think may have real efficacy" to treat COVID-19.

That drug is Remdesivir. It was first developed at UNC-Chapel Hill's Gillings School of Global Public Health.

WUNC reporter Jay Price speaks to Dr. Cameron Wolfe, associate professor of medicine at Duke University and the lead investigator in the new study, about the Remdesivir trial and its prospects for treating COVID-19.


Home

Mar 25, 2020

Today: Home.

Earlier today, Durham Mayor Steve Schewel issued a stay-at-home order for his city. A flurry of other counties and cities have issued similar orders in the past 24 hours.

But areas of our state are not being affected by Covid-19 in equal amounts. More than three dozen counties have no reported cases at all. So should the same rules apply to all of them?

We talk about that and more with Rose Hoban, the editor of North Carolina Health News.


Crashing

Mar 24, 2020

Today: Crashing.

We are now in week two of social distancing, and the economy is in free fall. That has the president and others wavering on the measures that medical personnel say will save lives. That dispute, between the illness and the pain caused by the remedy, is real, but it affects people unevenly.

We speak with WUNC reporter Jason deBruyn about unemployment and the short-term future of the North Carolina economy, and we offer an appreciation for the doctor leading the UNC System.


Decisions

Mar 23, 2020

Today: Decisions.

The number of personal decisions we are making every day has probably shrunk. We're driving less, not packing our kids' lunches, and eating out less. But the decisions we are making have likely taken on a whole lot more significance.

On this episode of Tested, we look at the current decisions being made by state leaders like Governor Roy Cooper and the past choices made by the General Assembly, and what impact those policies might be having on how the coronavirus pandemic is playing out in North Carolina.


Meet host Dave DeWitt on a quick guided tour of what to expect from WUNC's first-ever daily podcast.


N.C. Public Radio and N.C. Health News formed a partnership to provide updates on the spread of coronavirus and COVID-19 in North Carolina.
Laura Pellicer / WUNC

As the number of coronavirus cases climbs, hospitals in North Carolina are preparing for the worst – and so are the doctors, nurses, and everyone else in the health care system.

WUNC's Dave DeWitt chats with Rose Hoban, founder of North Carolina Health News, about the strain being felt by hospitals and health care workers, as they prepare for a possible tsunami of COVID-19 patients.

N.C. Public Radio and N.C. Health News formed a partnership to provide updates on the spread of coronavirus and COVID-19 in North Carolina.
Laura Pellicer / WUNC

Coronavirus testing is ramping up in North Carolina and across the country. But it still lags behind almost every other developed country in the world.

Thousands of tests are still in the pipeline here in the state. That number will jump considerably, as local health departments, doctor offices, academic medical centers and others ramp up their own testing sites.

Baric Lab
UNC-Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health / UNC-CH

Labs across the world are scrambling to develop a vaccine for COVID-19. But just as important is a more immediate treatment. The treatment the World Health Organization has classified as the most promising is coming out of a lab at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health.

A mostly unoccupied meeting room. The full UNC Board of Governors, and committees, met on the telephone on Dec. 12 and 13.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

At the very end of the Friday, Nov. 15th UNC Board of Governors meeting, Chairman Randy Ramsey made the kind of logistical announcement almost no one notices.

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