Dana Terry

PRODUCER, "THE STATE OF THINGS"

Dana is an award-winning producer who began as a personality at Rock 92.  Once she started creating content for morning shows, she developed a love for producing.  Dana has written and produced for local and syndicated commercial radio for over a decade.  WUNC is her debut into public radio and she’s excited to tell deeper, richer stories. 

Ways to Connect

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., talks to reporters a day after officially postponing President Donald Trump's State of the Union address until the government is fully reopened, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

Donald Trump’s longtime adviser Roger Stone was arrested early this morning. He is the sixth Trump adviser or official charged in Robert Muller’s investigation. Plus, as Donald Trump and Nancy Pelosi battle for power, federal employees will miss their second paycheck since the partial government shutdown began more than 30 days ago. 

Awards season is in full bloom. The Golden Globes, Screen Actors Guild Awards and The Oscars all consider “A Star is Born” and “Black Panther” among the best films of 2018.

Comedienne  Hilliary S. Begley at White Labs Kitchen making dumplings.
Courtesy of Jameykay Huffman

Asheville-based stand up comic Hilliary S. Begley had never acted professionally before landing a role in the hit Netflix movie “Dumplin.’” The film stars Jennifer Aniston, and is hailed as a feel-good, must-see movie of the season. It tells the story of a self-conscious teenage girl named Willowdean (Will), played by Danielle MacDonald, and her beauty-obsessed mother, played by Aniston, who is more concerned with running her beauty pageant than building a relationship with her daughter. 

Best-selling North Carolinian author Allan Gurganus.
Courtesy of Roger Haile

Allan Gurganus is a New York Times best-selling author whose work has been seen on both television and the Broadway stage. The TV adaptation of his novel “Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All” won four primetime Emmy awards, including a best supporting actress win for Cicely Tyson. He built much of his career telling stories of the old South, but in his early days Gurganus was an aspiring artist who studied painting at the University of Pennsylvania and Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. 

Thomas Rain Crowe reading at the San Francisco Poetry Festival
Courtesy of Joe Provenzano

The stories of beat poets helped define a generation. These poets spoke the language of the streets and defied the established literary canons. Poet and author Thomas Rain Crowe was in San Francisco in the 1970s, where he was mentored and inspired by the first generation of beat poets and was part of the “baby beat” generation. 

14-year-old Emmett Till was murdered by white men in 1955 while visiting family in Mississippi.
Wikimedia Commons

Timothy Tyson is known as an award-winning writer and historian. His books “Blood Done Sign My Name” and “The Blood of Emmett Till” capture a point in history when the fight for civil rights fostered a South ripe with fear, violence and anger. Tyson witnessed much of this first hand as the son of Reverend Vernon Tyson, a respected leader in the fight for social justice.

Art created for the band Arrow Beach.
Courtesy of Arrow Beach

Singer John Ensslin vividly remembers his first concert: Mick Jagger and The Rolling Stones in 1981. His next two live experiences were of David Byrne of Talking Heads and Richard Butler of The Psychedelic Furs. After watching the likes of Jagger, Ensslin knew he wanted to be a front man. He graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a degree in art, but even back in school music was his primary passion, and he spent much of his time playing music with friends. 

Photo: A woman working in chicken processing plant
Frontier Centre For Public Policy

Ethics questions continue to swirl around North Carolina House Speaker Tim Moore after reports that a high-ranking aid in his office contacted the state Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to inquire about storage tanks at a chicken processing plant in Siler City owned by Moore and his business partners. 

Peruvian Amazon, December 2011
Courtesy of Eloise Campbell

Panos Karan grew up with a piano in his home and a dad who loved to play on it for fun. At age 7, Karan asked for lessons, and while some would say it was the beginning of his road to becoming a concert pianist, his first piano teacher would disagree. She thought Karan had little potential, but he kept at it.

Arthur Ashe is known best as a tennis champion who achieved many firsts, including becoming the first and only African-American man to win a singles title at Wimbledon, the U.S. Open, and the Australian Open. But many do not know about his early years. Before he was acclaimed, Ashe was a small kid from Richmond getting soundly beat at the Algonquin Tennis Club in Durham’s Hayti District. The club sponsored annual tennis tournaments in the 1920s that would see the likes of Arthur Ashe and Althea Gibson. 

File photo of a protest sign in front of Chemours' President of Fluoroproducts Paul Kirsch during a community meeting hosted by the chemical company Chemours at Faith Tabernacle Christian Center in St. Pauls, N.C. on Tuesday, June 12, 2018.
Ben McKeown / WUNC

This week the Wilmington City Council is expected to vote on a consent order between the North Carolina State Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and Chemours that would require Chemours to pay $13 million in fines and fees and provide drinking water to the area surrounding its Fayetteville plant. 

Favorite Movie Of 2018

Jan 8, 2019
poster photo of A Star is Born
courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

The Screen Actors Guild Award nominations are in! “A Star is Born” and “Black Panther” are among the films that will battle it out for best picture. But who cares what SAG thinks? For our next Movies On The Radio, we want your favorite movie of 2018.

a photo of a cat and dog in front of a Christmas tree dressed in holiday clothing.
@RamboThePuppy

 “The State of Things” started 2018 with two new producers who brought an array of perspectives and talent to the show. One of them was Dana Terry: an entertainment industry veteran with years of experience producing for drivetime radio shows. This is her first foray into public radio, and she brought with her a number of entertainment industry contacts.

 

a street sign with the words education and future on them
Creative Commons/TCODL

 

Note: This segment is a rebroadcast from January 16, 2018. 

Education equity is becoming a popular phrase among educators, but what does it mean, and what is North Carolina doing to provide a sound education to both privileged and disadvantaged students? Nonprofit news organization EdNC explores the topic in their new documentary series “Equity Meets Education,” a story told through the eyes of four African-American leaders. 

photo of Dulce Sloan
Gabriel Michael

As a kid, Dulce Sloan wanted to be a serious thespian. She spent much of her childhood in plays and taking advantage of the opportunities for actors in Atlanta.

Peter Holsapple met his future band mate Will Rigby when he was just eight years old. They were in the drum section of their elementary school band, and little did they know they were beginning a musical journey of a lifetime. The two formed “Little Diesel,” the first punk band in North Carolina, along with childhood friend Chris Stamey.

Second graders in Jenna Parkers class at Edwin A. Anderson Elementary School reflect on their experiences of the past week on the first day back to school since Hurricane Florence made landfall in Wilmington.
Michael Cline Spencer / For WUNC

Education and school safety were top of mind both locally and nationally this year. WUNC reporters Liz Schlemmer and Lisa Phillip covered everything from the Silent Sam protests to the student-led walkouts after the school shooting in Parkland, Florida.

From law school to the judge's bench, these women have held tight to their friendship. L to R: Shamieka Rhinehart, Camille Banks-Prince, Keisha Wright Hill, Teresa Raquel Robinson Freeman
Elyse Ribbons / WUNC

The summer of 1998 was bright for Teresa Raquel Robinson Freeman, Shamieka Rhinehart, Camille Banks-Prince, and Keisha Wright Hill. They had each enrolled in law school at North Carolina Central University, and little did they know their paths were about to intersect in a way that would make them life-long friends. Affectionately calling themselves “The Golden Girls” after the popular 90s sitcom, these four women of color would endure break-ups, break downs and even death on a path that no one anticipated. That was 20 years ago. Today each is a judge. 

Coach Morgan Wootten, with the highest winning percentage of any coach in the history of the sport, doing what he does best.
Courtesy of Bill Hayes

Morgan Wootten is one of the most successful coaches in high school basketball history. Those from the Washington metro area may remember him for the legendary success of his DeMatha Catholic High School basketball team. During his close to 50 year tenure, DeMatha won more than 1,200 games and never lost more than two in a row. One of the most historic moments of his career was the team’s unexpected win up against a powerhouse team led by a player we now know as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. 

Photo of climate activists stop in front of the COP24 UN Climate Change Conference venue during the March for Climate in a protest against global warming in Katowice, Poland, Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018.
Alik Keplicz / AP Photo

The United Nations Climate Change Conference in Katowice, Poland is not going well for the Trump administration. Officials’ speeches have been met with laughter, hecklers, and people walking out of the room. Some protestors are calling the administration's push for clean coal “climate suicide.” The annual meeting, known informally as Cop24, is geared toward ending global warming, and this year attendees are focused on how to implement the Paris Agreement. 

Uma Avva remembers attending elementary school in Fayetteville and being asked: Are you black or white? She was neither. Avva’s family moved from India to the South in the 1960s, at a time when there were only three boxes to check on standardized forms: white, black, or other.

File photo of NC GOP Executive Director Dallas Woodhouse.
Adhiti Bandlamudi / WUNC

State and federal officials from both parties are calling for a full investigation into election fraud in North Carolina’s 9th Congressional District. With only 905 votes deciding the race between Republican Mark Harris and Democrat Dan McCready, and reports of absentee ballot irregularities, the state elections board voted to have an evidentiary hearing later this month. 

photo of the Cherokee County Detention Center
Frank Taylor/Carolina Public Press

A former Cherokee County Detention Center officer has been indicted on assault charges after allegedly kicking an inmate in the face. This is one of a growing number of complaints against authorities at that detention center.

photo of Mayor Nancy Vaughn at table talking to people.
Jordan Green/Triad City Beat

The death of Marcus Deon Smith was declared a homicide by the state medical examiner’s office. Within hours of this news, a Guilford County superior court judge authorized the release of the camera footage from the incident, which shows Smith wandering in the street and behaving erratically and Greensboro police placing him in a controversial restraint many compare to “hog-tying.”

NC Sheriffs, Sheriffs, Law Enforcement
Paula Dance for Pitt County Sheriff

When Paula Dance started her campaign for sheriff of Pitt County, she knew her win would make history. Dance would become the county’s first African-American sheriff and the first African-American female sheriff in the state. What she could not predict, however, was the wave of black sheriffs that would join her. The November midterms ushered in black sheriffs in Buncombe, Cumberland, Durham, Forsyth, Guilford, Mecklenburg, Pitt and Wake counties. Five of these countries have never had an African-American sheriff.  

One of the founding principles of the U.S. government is the separation of church and state. Yet there are many unseen ways in which the religion of America’s founders was baked into the legal system. Immigration attorney George Pappas traces the impact of religious doctrine on land rights in his new book “The Literary and Legal Genealogy of Native American Dispossession: The Marshall Trilogy Cases” (Routledge/2017). 

Photo of Protester with NC Stop Torture Now
Courtesy of NC Stop Torture Now / CC

A new in-depth report confirms that a North Carolina-based company “played an absolutely central role in the CIA’s torture program.” After an 18-month investigation, the North Carolina Commission of Inquiry on Torture identified 49 people who were taken on so-called “torture flights” by North Carolina-based aviation company Aero Contractors, Ltd., a private aviation company operating out of Johnston County. 

Shambling their way through the Triangle and into your heart this December.
Courtesy of Ellis Dyson & The Shambles

Growing up, Ellis Dyson loved listening to music on the radio until many of the songs started to sound the same. They had similar beats and were often formulaic. This epiphany led him to old-time jazz and artists like Jelly Roll Morton, and eventually to playing his own music. He began on the fiddle, moved on to the banjo, and started his own band as an undergraduate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Cover of the book, Elvis, Strait, to Jesus: An Iconic Producer's Journey with Legends of Rock 'n' Roll, Country, and Gospel Music, by Tony Brown.
Rick Caballo - Dead Horse Branding

Tony Brown is a music industry legend who produced 37 number one singles for George Strait. His legacy is large, but his roots are firmly planted in North Carolina. Brown was raised in Walkertown where his family cherished two things: church and gospel music. 

Photo of Susan Ladd, journalist and social justice advocate.
Courtesy of Luckyshot Productions

Susan Ladd grew up in a conservative, white family who taught her that black people were dangerous and should be feared. In the early 1970s, her parents chose not to send her to the recently desegregated Little River School near her home, but instead to a makeshift “pop up” school which was quickly erected and hastily staffed so that white children could avoid attending a black school. But despite her parents’ intentions, Ladd developed an intolerance toward racism and sexism and became a defender of the underdog. 

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