Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

Updated at 8:55 p.m. ET

Police in Sussex, England, say they have made two arrests in the disruption of flights because of drone sightings at busy Gatwick, the U.K.'s second-largest airport.

Flights had already resumed on Friday, after suspensions starting Wednesday night and a complete shutdown on Thursday night, leaving weary travelers longing for their holiday destinations.

President Trump's plan to withdraw all U.S. military forces from Syria has triggered disparate responses — from worries in liberated Raqqa and Kurdish-controlled areas to approval from Syrian and Russian officials.

Trump declared victory over ISIS, saying in a video Wednesday night, "We've beaten them and we've beaten them badly. We've taken back the land and now it's time for our troops to come back home."

Three days before voters were finally to cast their ballots for president, authorities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo declared something that's become familiar: another delay. The electoral commission announced Thursday that elections to replace President Joseph Kabila already two years behind schedule, have been postponed to Dec. 30.

South Africa is not done with Grace Mugabe yet.

In another twist to a saga fit for a small-screen soap — but writ large on the international stage — the country's authorities have issued an arrest warrant for the former first lady of Zimbabwe. They want her in custody for allegedly assaulting a young woman in a Johannesburg hotel room last year.

A third Canadian citizen has been detained in China, according to Global Affairs Canada, the country's foreign ministry. A ministry spokesperson declined to identify the citizen, citing provisions of Canada's Privacy Act.

"Consular officials are providing assistance to the family," the spokesperson added in a statement to NPR. It remains unclear what led to the detainment.

China's Foreign Affairs Ministry reportedly has said that it was not aware of a third Canadian detained in China.

More than seven weeks after the Sri Lankan president fired his prime minister, setting off a political maelstrom with the shocking decision, the saga appears to have reached a peaceful conclusion — by coming full circle.

U.S. officials are meeting with representatives of the Afghan Taliban for talks in the United Arab Emirates, the Islamist militant group announced Monday. The meeting, which was expected to include delegates from Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and the UAE, would mark a new step forward in tenuous peace negotiations.

The Taliban added, however, that it had no intention of meeting with members of the internationally recognized Afghan government.

More than a decade since Mexico first brought its case to the World Trade Organization, the country has lost its argument that U.S. labeling rules unfairly discriminate against its fishing industry.

Virgin Galactic says it has reached a rather lofty milestone.

During a test flight Thursday morning in Mojave, Calif., a pair of pilots flying the company's SpaceShipTwo spacecraft hit an altitude of 51.4 miles. That height clears the 50-mile threshold that is sometimes considered the boundary of space.

Just 10 days from a momentous presidential election in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a warehouse fire in the capital has severely complicated the country's preparations. The blaze, which broke out around 2 a.m. local time Thursday, destroyed the voting equipment for 19 of Kinshasa's 24 polling stations.

Before the sun rose Wednesday over Tennessee, some residents in the eastern half of the state got a wake-up call. But it wasn't a friend or partner shaking them awake, it was the very ground beneath their beds.

A magnitude 4.4 earthquake struck at around 4:14 a.m. ET near Decatur, Tenn., about 150 miles southeast of Nashville. But Tennessee residents weren't the only ones to feel the temblor. More than 7,700 people (so far) have reported experiencing it, from Kentucky and northern Alabama to the western Carolinas. The earthquake even made its presence felt in Atlanta.

When you hit your 40s, it's only natural to want to try new things.

Updated at 12:35 p.m. ET

British Prime Minister Theresa May has postponed a critical vote on the draft Brexit deal she negotiated with the European Union, conceding that it would not have enough support to pass Parliament if the vote were held Tuesday as scheduled.

"I've listened very carefully to what has been said in this chamber and out of it, by members from all sides," May told the House of Commons on Monday, only to be interrupted by a peal of derisive laughter from lawmakers.

Nearly a year after a vehicle rammed a crowd of pedestrians in Melbourne, Australia, killing one person and injuring more than a dozen others, the man behind the wheel has admitted to murder. Saeed Noori, 33, pleaded guilty to one count of murder, 11 of recklessly causing serious injury and five of conduct endangering life.

Just days after Kevin Hart got the nod to host the 91st Academy Awards ceremony, declaring it "the opportunity of a life time," the comedian is relinquishing the microphone. Hart announced that he is stepping down, citing his series of years-old homophobic tweets that had recently resurfaced.

Just days after President Trump announced a "BIG leap forward" in relations between the U.S. and China, tensions between the two economic heavyweights are escalating once more. This time, the focus of the friction is on Meng Wanzhou, scion of a Chinese telecommunications giant.

Updated at 5:56 a.m. ET

As December draws its darkest hours ever longer, inching moment by moment toward the shortest day of the year — in the northern hemisphere, at least — the Pantone Color Institute is striking a defiant tone. The global experts in hue have crowned "living coral" as their annual color of the year for 2019.

Believe it or not, Seattle already has its place etched in ice hockey history.

Once home to the erstwhile Metropolitans, the city was the first ever in the U.S. to hoist a Stanley Cup — though, since that feat was achieved in 1917, it's unlikely more than a few people living today (if any) were actually around to see it.

Now, nearly a century after the Metropolitans folded, Seattle natives will finally get a chance to see a band of hometown heroes pursue Lord Stanley's legendary trophy again.

Just over a month since the University of Maryland fired DJ Durkin, dismissing the football coach amid a months-long controversy over a player's death, the school has named the man set to replace him: Alabama Offensive Coordinator Michael Locksley.

Updated at 3:36 a.m. ET

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center posted its dire warning just minutes after a magnitude 7.6 earthquake struck undersea in the South Pacific: Given the temblor's location, and its shallow depth of 6 miles, Vanuatu and the French territory of New Caledonia risked being right in the cross-hairs of possible "hazardous tsunami waves."

More than three hours later, local officials could finally breathe a sigh of relief.

Israel has launched a military operation intended to "expose and destroy" a series of tunnels it says Hezbollah dug into Israel from Lebanon, where the militant group is based. The Israel Defense Forces embarked on Operation Northern Shield on Tuesday, surprising observers on both sides of the border.

An independent autopsy has found that Emantic "EJ" Bradford Jr., a black man killed by police on Thanksgiving night, was shot three times from behind during the incident in an Alabama mall. Lawyers for Bradford's family released the results Monday, saying they confirmed he had been fleeing with his back turned at the time he was killed.

Just days after Marriott International disclosed a massive cybersecurity breach, Quora has announced that it, too, has been attacked by hackers. The popular question-and-answer website said Monday that a "malicious third party" may have lifted the account information of some 100 million users.

If you take the long view, international health organizations have much to be encouraged about when it comes to the global fight against measles. From 2000 to 2017, for instance, the annual number of measles-related deaths dropped 80 percent — from a toll of over half a million to just under 110,000 last year.

For the second time in three years, life expectancy in the U.S. has ticked downward. In three reports issued Thursday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention laid out a series of statistics that revealed some troubling trend lines — including rapidly increasing rates of death from drug overdoses and suicide.

CDC Director Robert Redfield described the data as "troubling."

The tragic phone call came in Friday morning.

That's when Ballybrack FC, an amateur Dublin soccer team, told league officials that one of its players had been killed in a traffic accident on his way home from practice. Fernando LaFuente, sadly, had played his last game.

When Hassan Al Kontar posted his first videos to Twitter, slouched in a chair in Kuala Lumpur International Airport, his hair was clipped short. His beard was trimmed neatly, his sweatshirt freshly laundered. Only his eyes, for the moment, betrayed a certain creeping despair.

Deep in the grips of an Ebola outbreak, the Democratic Republic of the Congo has embarked on an "important step" toward finding an effective treatment for the deadly virus. The World Health Organization said the country has launched the first-ever multidrug clinical trial for potential Ebola treatments.

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