Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Update at 1:33 a.m. ET

An undisclosed number of hostages are being held at a chocolate shop and cafe in Sydney, Australia. Reuters is reporting that police say they've made contact with the gunman and that TV footage showed three then two more people running from the scene. The number of hostages is said to be "not as high as 30," according to New South Wales Deputy Police Commissioner Catherine Burn.

University of Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota is the winner of this year's Heisman Trophy by a landslide. It's the first win for the Ducks.

The Associated Press reports:

"A pinpoint passer with wide-receiver speed, Mariota came into his junior the season as the favorite to win the Heisman and delivered a performance that turned the presentation ceremony into a foregone conclusion.

Risen, who shared a Pulitzer Prize for revealing the scope of the NSA's warrentless wiretapping program in 2005, refused, and risked jail as a result.

In June, however, Holder insisted that Risen wouldn't face jail time, saying, "As long as I'm attorney general, no reporter who is doing his job is going to go to jail."

Republican congressman Bill Cassidy has defeated Democratic incumbent Sen. Mary Landrieu in Louisiana's runoff Senate election, boosting the Republican majority in the incoming Senate.

NPR's Debbie Elliott reported Friday that Cassidy, who has pledged to repeal Obamacare, followed a campaign strategy of linking Landrieu to Obama, highlighting her support of the unpopular president.

Remains of one of the 43 missing college students in Mexico have been identified, NPR's Mexico correspondent Carrie Kahn reports for our Newscast division.

DNA tests showed that bone fragments matched a student identified as Alexander Mora Venancio, 19, one of the students who went missing in September, allegedly kidnapped and murdered by a drug gang that was working with local police. The identification was announced on the Facebook page of the teaching school attended by the students, Kahn says, as well as by multiple media outlets.

An Ohio State University student who went missing Wednesday was found dead Sunday, apparently from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, police say.

The Associated Press reports that Kosta Karageorge, 22, was a senior defensive tackle on the OSU football team and a former Buckeyes wrestler.

Philip Crane, a former Illinois congressman who spent 35 years in the House of Representatives, has died of lung cancer at the age of 84.

Crane, a conservative Republican and anti-tax crusader, was a history professor before he became a politician. He entered Congress in 1969, and he "was the longest-serving House Republican when he was defeated in 2004 by Democrat and then-political newcomer Melissa Bean," writes The Associated Press. The wire service continues:

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