Anita Rao

Managing Editor, "The State of Things"/ Host, "Embodied"

Anita Rao is the host and creator of "Embodied," a live, weekly radio show and seasonal podcast about sex, relationships & health. She's also the managing editor of WUNC's on-demand content. She has traveled the country recording interviews for the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps production department, founded and launched a podcast about millennial feminism in the South, and served as the managing editor and regular host of "The State of Things," North Carolina Public Radio's flagship daily, live talk show. Anita was born in a small coal-mining town in Northeast England but spent most of her life growing up in Iowa and has a fond affection for the Midwest.

Ways to Connect

A moment from Grounded, a one-woman show featuring Madeleine Lambert.
Jon Haas

After an unexpected pregnancy, an F-16 pilot gets reassigned to a desk job: flying drones from an armchair in a windowless trailer in Nevada.

  

Wilmington-based non profit Black Arts Alliance presents a four-day festival featuring the work of black filmmakers from around the country.

    

In 1972, jazz trumpeter Lee Morgan was fatally shot in a New York City club where he had performed. The killer of the 33 year-old? His common-law wife Helen Morgan. After the incident, she disappeared from the public eye and little else was known about her until recently.

Coal fired power plant
eutrophication&hypoxia via Flickr, Creative Commons

In the immediate aftermath of last month’s Duke Energy coal ash spill, concerns were raised about the existence of similar pipes at other ponds around the state. Yesterday, the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, DENR, confirmed the presence of eight additional corrugated metal pipes at Duke Energy coal ash ponds. 

Broughton High School teacher Lee Quinn speaks out against the 25 percent mandate.
Dave DeWitt

Durham school board members voted unanimously yesterday to join a lawsuit that challenges the elimination of teacher tenure and replaces it with a selective performance pay system. 

Yelitza Castro, an undocumented immigrant who works as a housekeeper in Charlotte, N.C., cooks dinners for homeless men and women every other Saturday night. It's a tradition that started after she and her children spotted a man standing in the rain on a cold day with a sign asking for help.

Yelitza gave the man $5, she recalls, but her children wanted to take him out to dinner. She turned around to go back, but he was already gone.

"And we were thinking we have to do something," she says.

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