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To be an oil person in Kansas is to understand that bad times follow good and that betting on any dip or upswing is a game for suckers.

Yet it can be so tempting when crude prices soar. There’s so much money to be made. Or, of course, lost.

The far-flung, mostly small and independent oil and gas companies in the state found themselves laid flat by the bust of 2014. It still stings.

Columbus, Ohio, is open for business on Columbus Day, as the city is not observing the day that honors its controversial namesake. The move will let it do more to observe Veterans Day, the city says.

Ohio's capital city announced the move late last week, issuing a short news release to note that its offices are open on Monday, and that trash collection and parking laws will be handled as usual.

The Standard Gauge Railway station in Nairobi is easily the most impressive public building in Kenya.

While a lot of Kenyan government buildings are drab and functional and date back to colonial days, this station is adventurous. It's all gray and modern. Geometric shapes form an abstract locomotive, and red neon announces the "Nairobi Terminus."

It was lunch time in Manhattan and Anastasia Tzdanides had just made a makeup run to Sephora. She picked up “some Hourglass products; a brush, blush, bronzer,” she said.

At 23, Tzdanides is a typical young cosmetics buyer. She buys lots of different brands after she's researched them online. Her mother, Johanna, who was shopping with her, said her generation did things differently. 

“We stuck with one brand; you used Clarins or you used Lancome. Where here you try the different ones and you kind of mix everything,” she said.

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Midterm elections have often been seen as a referendum on the president and his party. Many presidents try to shy away from that idea. But not Donald Trump. He has a lot on the line next month, and he knows it, as NPR's Mara Liasson reports.

The Hate U Give tells the story of a 16-year-old girl named Starr Carter. She lives in a mostly black, lower-income neighborhood called Garden Heights. Williamson Prep, her high school, is in a mostly white, affluent part of town.

But Starr can't keep her two worlds separate after she witnesses a white police officer shoot and kill her childhood friend, Khalil.

Unlabeled stimulants in soft drinks. Formaldehyde in meat and milk. Borax — the stuff used to kill ants! — used as a common food preservative. The American food industry was once a wild and dangerous place for the consumer.

Deborah Blum's new book, The Poison Squad, is a true story about how Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley, named chief chemist of the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1883, conducted a rather grisly experiment on human volunteers to help make food safer for consumers — and his work still echoes on today.

"Ring of Red: A Barrio Story" relies on oral histories to tell the rarely heard stories of Mexican-American veterans.

My Economy tells the story of the new economic normal through the eyes of people trying to make it, because we know the only numbers that really matter are the ones in your economy.

(Markets Edition) Has the world gotten complacent about the price of oil? According to the Wall Street Journal, bets on oil surpassing $100 per barrel have doubled in the last month. Julia Coronado at Macropolicy Perspectives has more. Then, we examine the growing trade deficit as seen through goods and services … specifically services. Also, across two hemispheres, officials are cutting back on how much financial cushion banks set aside for emergencies.

Updated at 11:55 p.m. ET

Hurricane Michael is expected to strengthen rapidly over the next 24 to 36 hours and will be "a dangerous major hurricane when it reaches the northeastern Gulf Coast on Wednesday," the National Hurricane Center says.

The storm achieved hurricane status with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph Monday morning, triggering warnings of a life-threatening storm surge that could hit the Florida Gulf Coast. Later in the day, its sustained winds topped 90 mph, with stronger gusts.

Like many churchgoers in Romania, retired engineer Marius Tufis opposes same-sex marriage.

"I don't like man with man and woman with woman," he said, frowning in the sun after Sunday's service. "Our religion does not accept this."

Same-sex marriage is already banned in Romanian civil code, but that's not enough for Tufis. He worries that the European Union, which he sees as divided between the liberal West and the conservative East, will force Romania to change the law.

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Here’s an unusual tale of urban revival in the U.K., which owes much to an iconic entertainer from the U.S. The small Welsh seaside resort of Porthcawl — population 10,000 — had been waning for years. Holidaymakers had been choosing sunnier vacations overseas and the town, with its rather antiquated fairground and slightly tacky amusement arcades, was sliding into seedy decline.

But now the town is undergoing an economic renaissance.

And it’s largely thanks to the King of Rock n' Roll.

Interpol President Meng Hongwei has resigned, after being detained by Chinese authorities who accuse him of corruption. The shocking turnabout comes days after Meng's wife said the career police officer had disappeared; one week ago, he left France to visit his native China.

Dairy was one of the sticking points between the United States and Canada during the negotiations to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement.

American producers of milk and cheese complained Canada's tightly controlled dairy industry limited their access to markets north of the border. The new agreement opens the door to more U.S. milk exports to Canada.

While it could lead to lower prices there, many Canadians worry about the fate of small milk and cheese producers, particularly in Quebec, home to half of Canadian dairy production. 

(U.S. Edition) Scientists with the International Panel on Climate Change have gathered in South Korea and released a report Monday outlining the steps that need to be taken to stop global temperatures from rising by more than 1.5 degrees Celsius. It also says that We also examine how goods and services indicate a growing trade deficit, but services alone offer different insights.

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As clerical sex abuse scandals buffet the Catholic Church, a three-week assembly of bishops is under way in Rome on how to make the Church relevant for young people. But the assembly, known as a synod, will likely be dominated by what many analysts call Catholicism's worst crisis since the reformation.

Roughly 250 priests, bishops, cardinals and some younger laypersons are participating in the synod.

In the opening mass, pope Francis urged them "to dream and to hope."

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(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service …  A new report on climate change says 2.5 percent of global GDP needs to be spent each year for two decades to stop global warming. We hear from the co-chair of the International Panel on Climate Change. Then, Brazil’s voters handed a previously fringe candidate nearly half the vote in Sunday’s election, but he’ll face a runoff election  at the end of the month after failing to secure a majority. What does that mean for a country facing continued economic hardship?

Almost 40 percent of rural America, or about 23 million people, don't have access to broadband internet or reliable mobile service. Long term, this digital divide is a huge economic problem. Companies need high-skilled workers, and people without decent internet access can't find those jobs or get the training they might need to do them. Now the Fed is trying convince businesses that the digital divide is their problem, too, Jeremy Hegle told us. He's a senior community development adviser for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

Almost 40 percent of rural America, or about 23 million people, don't have access to broadband internet or reliable mobile service. Long term, this digital divide is a huge economic problem. Companies need high-skilled workers, and people without decent internet access can't find those jobs or get the training they might need to do them. Now the Fed is trying convince businesses that the digital divide is their problem, too, Jeremy Hegle told us. He's a senior community development adviser for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

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The three-month confirmation fight is over, and Brett Kavanaugh is the newest associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Yesterday he was in his chambers preparing for oral arguments before this newly constituted court.

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Some of the world's top climate scientists have concluded that global warming is likely to reach dangerous levels unless new technologies are developed to remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) says pledges from the world's governments to reduce greenhouse gases, made in Paris in 2015, aren't enough to keep global warming from rising more than 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees F) above pre-industrial temperatures.

Brett Kavanaugh is a Supreme Court justice. That much is certain after senators narrowly approved his controversial nomination Saturday, putting an end to his bitter confirmation battle with a slim vote in his favor.

But even as one phase of Kavanaugh's story ends, another is beginning: His lifetime tenure on the highest court in the U.S. And this story promises to last much longer.

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We're going to go now to a tragic story from upstate New York. Twenty people are dead after a limousine crash this weekend. Lucas Willard of member station WAMC has this story.

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