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2 First-Time Boston Marathoners Emerge Victorious

Edna Kiplagat (left) and Geoffrey Kirui, both of Kenya, hold a trophy together after their victories in the 121st Boston Marathon on Monday.
Edna Kiplagat (left) and Geoffrey Kirui, both of Kenya, hold a trophy together after their victories in the 121st Boston Marathon on Monday.

Two Kenyan runners, both of them making their Boston Marathon debut, have won the prestigious race.

Edna Kiplagat, a Kenyan policewoman and two-time world champion marathoner, finished first in the women's race with a time of 2:21:52. Rose Chelimo, a Kenyan-born Bahraini runner, placed second.

Geoffrey Kirui, also of Kenya, won the mens' race at 2:09:37 — his first-ever marathon victory. He edged out Portland runner Galen Rupp by 21 seconds.

It was a big day for debut runners at Boston, according to Runner's World.

In the women's race, 25-year-old Jordan Hasay ran her first-ever marathon in 2:23:00 to place third. It was the fastest-ever debut by an American woman, Runner's World says.

And in the men's race, 26-year-old Suguru Osako of Japan — also competing in his first marathon — placed third with 2:10:28.

Meanwhile, competitors in the wheelchair race finished in world-best times, The Associated Press reports:

"Manuela Schar of Switzerland finished in 1 hour, 28 minutes, 17 seconds — shattering the world best by more than five minutes. Fellow Swiss Marcel Hug took the men's race in 1:18:04, also the fastest time ever.

"The winners' times are considered a world best and not a world record. The straight-line Boston course doesn't qualify for world records because of the possibility of a supportive tailwind like the one on Monday."

The athletes had a tailwind of 13 mph, the AP reports.

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