Education

This section collects Education stories from WUNC News & other sources.

The Old Well and flowers on the campus of UNC- Chapel Hill.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

The U.S. Department of Education is investigating a conference on the Middle East held at the University of North Carolina after a legislator raised complaints that participants were biased against Israel.

Teacher in classroom with students.
woodleywonderworks / Flickr - Creative Commons - https://flic.kr/p/auPuAq

Teachers across the state of North Carolina who haven’t been able to pass a licensure exam could get an extension from the General Assembly.

An image of Duke Campus
Duke University

Duke University is agreeing to pay more than $54 million to settle claims that it and nearby University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill conspired to hold down salaries of medical professors by agreeing not to hire staff away from each other.

Sandy Hook Promise

At the start of the next school year, North Carolina middle and high school students will have a new tool to report threats to school safety. State Superintendent Mark Johnson introduced the “Say Something Anonymous Reporting System” at a press conference Thursday.

Lisa Philip / WUNC

Almost every day, 27-year-old Aubree Waddell takes her two youngest kids to the public library in Garner, to keep them busy. Today she’s sitting at a little table in the kids’ section with her baby daughter in her arms. Waddell’s four-year-old son, Micah is trying to read with his baby sister.

The results of an Elon University faculty union election are still pending.

photo of an apple on top of books
Kate Ter Haar / Creative Commons

The Guilford County Board of Education voted to close Hampton Elementary School permanently due to tornado damage and other issues affecting the aging school.

A picture of UNC grad turning their graduation tassle
UNC-Chapel Hill

Proud grads in cap and gowns walk across the stage this weekend at commencement ceremonies around the state.

Hundreds of teachers rallied at North Carolina’s state capital last week to call for more resources for educators and students. A lot of demands and claims and counter claims swirled around the gathering – from teacher’s groups and Republican lawmakers. That meant the Raleigh News and Observer’s Paul Specht was busy. He joins WFAE's "Morning Edition" host Lisa Worf. 

Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Thousands of educators and their supporters from across North Carolina are filling the streets of downtown Raleigh today to demand greater financial investment in public schools from the state legislature. The demonstration comes two days after the House revealed its draft budget for the state, which does not meet most of the marchers' demands.

Demonstrators today held signs with messages for lawmakers, including "They say cut back, we say fight back," and "Don't make me use my teacher voice."

demonstrators holding a banner that says 'Strong Students, Strong Schools, Strong Communities'
Rusty Jacobs/WUNC

Educators from around the state are descending on Raleigh today to call on lawmakers to increase support for public schools. Last year a similar teacher protest drew about 20,000 educators and supporters to North Carolina’s capital.

A North Carolina Public Schools bus in Orange County.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

North Carolina teachers didn't win the pay hikes and other changes they sought last year, despite a rally that brought 20,000 people to the capital, but they believe their activism helped elect a more sympathetic legislature and will take to the streets again Wednesday.

Delven Mearis of Durham Public Schools rallied as small crowd waited for busloads of teachers to arrive ahead of the march.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Following the success of last year’s walkout, North Carolina teachers are staging another protest tomorrow. This year an expected 31 school districts have cancelled classes in anticipation of the rally. Stated goals include: increasing minimum wage to $15; reinstating compensation for advanced degrees; and providing more classroom support.

More than 80% of parents in the U.S. support the teaching of climate change. And that support crosses political divides, according to the results of an exclusive new NPR/Ipsos poll: Whether they have children or not, two-thirds of Republicans and 9 in 10 Democrats agree that the subject needs to be taught in school.

A separate poll of teachers found that they are even more supportive, in theory — 86% agree that climate change should be taught.

Kindergarten students TT Askew, Alicia Garcia Elvira, Haylen Lovelace and Mercy Nelms are students in Jakeli Swimmer's Cherokee language and culture class at Robbinsville Elementary.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Marty Richardson was in high school when he started a deep dive into the history of his people:  the Haliwa-Saponi Indian Tribe. He emerged from dusty library archives with the epiphany that his ancestors spoke Tutelo-Saponi, a language that had since nearly disappeared. 

UNC System interim president Bill Roper, left, announced Tuesday that Dan Gerlach, right, will serve as ECU's leader.
East Carolina University

A former budget analyst at the North Carolina Legislature and adviser to the governor is now the interim chancellor at East Carolina University.

UNC Police chief Jeff B. McCracken
UNC

The police chief at North Carolina's flagship public university is retiring after an investigation found campus police were unprepared for demonstrators who tore down a Confederate memorial last summer.

Police guard the pedestal where the Silent Sam statue once stood on UNC's campus during a protest on Dec. 3, 2018.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

Leadership of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are close to finalizing the roster of a new campus safety committee.

Elon University
Elon University

A North Carolina university is launching a fundraising campaign it hopes will expand access to education on its campus.

Wilson Sayre / WUNC

Evergreen Elementary School in Columbus County is clean, tidy, and nearly 100 years old. Light comes in through parts of the roof in the gym where the dark brown floor boards have buckled up in little swollen hills two inches tall. Classrooms inside the main building are small based on today's standards, the auditorium is not compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act and technology is an afterthought.

Don McCullough / Flickr

Updated at 11:20 a.m.

UNC spokesman Randy Young said no arrests had been made as of Tuesday morning.

Updated at 7 p.m.

UNC Police have taken out arrest warrants for two suspects involved in the racist vandalism on University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's campus, said UNC Police spokesperson Randy Young.

UNC Police said they are "conducting a thorough criminal investigation" and "will not be releasing any details that could impede that investigation or subsequent prosecution," including the language used in the graffiti.

Barricades have been reerected around the Unsung Founders Memorial "to deter future incidents," and police "continue to monitor any threats to the campus," according to Young.

Updated at 3:30 p.m.

Early Sunday morning, two individuals defaced the Unsung Founders Memorial on the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's campus with racist graffiti, according to a statement issued by UNC-CH Interim Chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz. The memorial is located in McCorkle Place at the heart of the campus, not far from the site where the Silent Sam Confederate monument was toppled and the base later removed.

Charter Day Shool
Charter Day Shool

A North Carolina charter school promoting traditional values engaged in unconstitutional sex discrimination by requiring girls to wear skirts, a federal judge has ruled.

Delven Mearis of Durham Public Schools rallied as small crowd waited for busloads of teachers to arrive ahead of the march.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

North Carolina's largest teacher-lobbying group will organize another march and rally this spring to seek higher school salaries and funding from the General Assembly.

Stormy skies over Duke University's west campus.
Duke Photography

Duke University will pay $112.5 million to settle allegations that university officials knew about fraudulent research in one of its labs and actively concealed the fraud in order to win federal research grants.

Harry Smith, center, was elected as the new UNC Board of Governors chairman.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

University of North Carolina Board of Governors member Steve Long has apologized for comments he made earlier this week disparaging the leadership of his chairman, Harry Smith. At a full meeting of the board at Appalachian State University in Boone on Friday, Long said he should have come directly to Smith with his concerns.

Carol Folt
unc.edu

The new president of the University of Southern California said she wants to be a part of "fixing" the school following a series of high-profile scandals including the massive college admissions bribery case that broke last week.

A view of the Wake Forest University campus
Ken Bennett / Wake Forest University

In the wake of a massive college bribery scheme, the schools caught in the middle have been left facing a thorny question: What to do about the students who may have been admitted through fraud?

Lisa Philip / WUNC

A member of the UNC Board of Governors is calling for the ousting of the board’s chairman, Harry Smith, saying his continued leadership will further damage the state’s public university system.

East Carolina University Chancellor Cecil Staton.
East Carolina University

The list of leaders who are departing the university system in North Carolina is growing. East Carolina University Chancellor Cecil Staton announced this morning that he will resign his position.

Students with disabilities and disability rights advocates are among those angry — and feeling victimized — after the arrests in the college admissions and bribery scandal Tuesday.

"Stories like this are why we continue to see backlash to disability rights laws," Rebecca Cokley, director of the Disability Justice Initiative at the Center for American Progress, said in a statement.

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