Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Spike Lee poses with the award for best adapted screenplay for 'BlacKkKlansman' in the press room at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 24, 2019, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.
Jordan Strauss / AP

Hollywood's biggest night of the year is over, and in the wake of all the glitz and glam there is both celebration and head scratching. Spike Lee won his first competitive Oscar for best adapted screenplay and jumped into presenter Samuel L. Jackson’s arms in one of the most emotive moments of the night. 

Mary Webb Nicholson a Greensboro native, become first woman in North Carolina to earn a private pilots' license, commercial and transport licenses. During WWII, she was among a group of American women pilots who assisted British Air Transport Auxilary.
Courtesy of Greensboro History Museum

The Ruth Wicker Tribute to Women is one of the first standalone exhibits in North Carolina to commemorate the specific achievements of women in the state. The interactive exhibit opened earlier this year in the Barber Park Event Center and documents 31 influential women from the 18th century to the present, including 10 who were “firsts” in their field or position.

Courtesy of Casey Noel

Casey Noel is hesitant to categorize her music into a particular genre. She draws influence from a large swath of artists ranging from the rock band Creedence Clearwater Revival to Adele. Noel plays guitar, sings and started writing her own music three years ago. She will soon be recording songs for a debut record. 

Andrea Nguyen is a best-selling cookbook author and expert on Vietnamese cooking. Nguyen says, in the past, cooking Vietnamese food in America meant multiple shopping trips to specialized Asian markets or substituting ingredients that just couldn't be found here. Thankfully, times have changed and more authentic Vietnamese ingredients are more readily available in the U.S.

Courtesy of Jose Galvez

José Gálvez was a 10-year-old shoe-shine boy when he first stepped foot in the newsroom of the Arizona Daily Star. His entry into that building was his first step in a decades-long career as a photojournalist that would eventually earn him a Pulitzer Prize for public service journalism. His winning series, like much of his work, showed the positive and mundane side of life in Latino communities in America.

It turns out the Oscars telecast doesn't need a host.

An image of Carolina Chocolate Drops
Julie Roberts

We've teamed up with Come Hear NC on a podcast series that explores North Carolina music one song at a time. On this week's episode Music Maker Relief Foundation co-founder Tim Duffy talks with Eric Hodge about 'Cornbread And Butterbeans' from the Grammy Award winning album Genuine Negro Jig by The Carolina Chocolate Drops.

Moth 2019 Spring Fundraiser

Feb 22, 2019

Christian McBride - A young musician gets a once in a lifetime shot at the big time.
Karen Gearon - With her fellow shopworkers at the Dunnes Stores, Karen goes on strike and sparks international interest in the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa. 
Dr. Mary Claire King - Discovers the inherited breast cancer gene after enduring personal heartbreak. 

Ideas for scripting are included below to segue between stories, adapt for your station's approach. NPR news compatible. 

In Famiglia

Feb 22, 2019
Bob Baril
Allison Evans

Kay Elmsley Weeden and her siblings have adventures on the Wisconsin River. Marjace Miles searches for meaning amidst an unexpected pregnancy. Bob Baril gets a once in a lifetime experience with his son. Jahvannia Darling keeps a secret from her mother. Qing Zhao must choose between love and her career. Carmen Putnam experiences the hope of a new pregnancy while mourning her stillborn child.

Faith Jones in a field of flowers.
Courtesy of Faith Jones

Music is in Faith Jones’ blood. Her father plays piano; her mother sings, and the two met in a band in the 1980s. Growing up, Jones and her family listened to a wide range of music around the house, from jazz to classic rock. 

A photo of Maya De Vitry.
Laura Partain

After spending several years collaborating with her band mates in The Stray Birds, singer-songwriter Maya de Vitry set out to find a different voice. What transpired were a lot of walks in the woods, traveling to meet friends old and new and mustering the confidence to sing her own songs in her own voice. The result is Adaptations

When it came time to take calls from listeners for our 100% cheese-filled episode "Say Cheese!," we knew there was only one person we could turn to for both entertaining and expert advice, the fabulous Tia Keenan.

Cheese tips for the home: storage, freezing, and saving rinds

Feb 22, 2019

You've gone to the cheese shop or market and you invested in a great cheese. You’re back home, now what? How do you store it? Is that smell okay? Can you freeze it? America’s Test Kitchen has answers to these and many more cheese questions. Managing Producer Sally Swift talked with Jack Bishop, Chief Creative Officer at America’s Test Kitchen. He also shared the recipe for Frico, the crispy Italian cheese wafer.

When it comes to the cheeses we love most, we generally think of farmers, cheesemakers and, well, cows. But there is another person, perhaps the most important in the equation: cheesemongers. They are the experts that help us determine what cheese we are looking for depending on our mood, food and drink pairings, or event. There is art, science and wildly precise skill to what they do. The Cheesemonger Invitational finds the best of the best.

The aromas and flavors of cheese are uncountable. Every variety of cheese has its own set of sensory characteristics, and they can be different from country to country or from farm to farm. The task of knowing all of these flavors so that regular people like us can better understand them is the job of the cheesemonger. Sure, farmers, cheesemakers and cows get all the credit for amazing cheese, but without expert cheesemongers like Greselda Powell, from Murray's Cheese in New York City, we likely wouldn't know about any of them.

This week, hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot explore the history and legacy of the almost 50-year-old Chicago blues label, Alligator Records, with its founder Bruce Iglauer. They'll talk to him about his new book Bitten By the Blues: The Alligator Records Story and discuss some of the landmark artists who came through, from Koko Taylor to Albert Collins.

photo of Bill Ferris and Marcie Cohen Ferris
photo courtesy of Bill Ferris

William Ferris is known around North Carolina as a folklorist — a man whose passion is to chronicle the stories, music and culture of the American South. His love for documenting his communities began as a boy.  At 12 years old, he was given a camera and began to take photographs around his neighborhood in Warren County, Mississippi. There are tales of young Ferris taking a reel-to-reel recorder to record hymns at church. 

 Harper Watters (The Houston Ballet) dancing
photo courtesy of Nu Arts Productions

Saturday morning dance classes around the country are filled with little girls dreaming of becoming the next Misty Copeland. But what happens when a young boy dreams of becoming the next Mikhail Baryshnikov?

'We do this because the world we live in is a house on fire and the people we love are burning.'  - Sandra Cisneros
Courtesy of Keith Dannemiller

Sandra Cisneros is best known as the author behind the literary classic “The House on Mango Street,” a book that has been translated into over twenty languages. She has penned poetry, short stories, novels and essays. These days, beyond writing, the acclaimed author is spending a lot of time listening. 

Portrait of Max Roach, Three Deuces, New York, N.Y., ca. Oct. 1947.
William P. Gottlieb / Library of Congress

North Carolina-born jazz musician Max Roach carved out a creative legacy in music that spanned genres. Roach grew up in New York City and during the 1940s he drummed alongside artists like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie. 

His recordings were innovative and during the civil rights movement, even political. To honor Roach, Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center is hosting a restaging of Roach’s “We Insist! Freedom Now Suite” recording.

From the 'Pop América, 1965-1975' exhibit at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.
Courtesy of the Nasher Museum of Art

Many people associate pop art with American artists like Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, but there were many contributions to the movement from outside the borders of the United States, notably from Latin American artists. A new exhibit at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University called “Pop América, 1965-1975” shares the work of artists from the Americas, from Tierra del Fuego up to Anchorage. 

The red line: Racial disparities in lending

Feb 17, 2019

It’s been 10 years since the great housing bust and lending is back for some Americans, but not for others. In dozens of cities across the country, lenders are more likely to deny loans to applicants of color than white ones.


On this episode of Reveal, we dig into the new redlining.

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Tift Merritt
Alexandra Valenti / Sacks & Co.

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our music discovery station, WUNC Music.

Cartoons, Cleanups, and Close Calls

Feb 15, 2019
Ijeoma Oluo
Heather Immor

Matthew Diffee decides to become a cartoonist.

Ijeoma Oluo realizes that a school teacher was trying to be charitable.

Tara Clancy lives a dual lifestyle growing up in Queens and The Hamptons.

Nancy Finton narrowly escapes an attacker.

When offensive or FCC-prohibited words appear, they are bleeped and listed in the Content Advisory.  Sensitive content will be given an on-air caution and will be noted here in the description. 

Courtesy Tom Merrigan's Hot Raccoons

Raccoons. For many, they are scheming trash denizens and a neighborhood scourge. But musician Tom Merrigan has a deep and mildly obsessive relationship with the creatures and shares their propensity for night roams and mischief. His band name, Tom Merrigan’s Hot Raccoons, is a tribute to that bond. 

Transitioning from economics to art, this Cameroonian sculptor is inspired by the environment around him.
Courtesy of Jean Michel Dissake

Jean Michel Dissake was an economics student at the University of Douala in Cameroon when he made a radical shift: He left school and spent the next nine years living in the forest. He spent his days interacting with the trees and the river, and this deep connection with nature spawned an artistic passion and a career as a sculptor. 

Sound Opinions: Songs About Writers

Feb 14, 2019

This week, hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot explore literature’s influence on popular music and how famous scribes like Shakespeare, Oscar Wilde and more get name drops. They'll share some of their favorite songs about writers.

Five Years on Nauru

Feb 14, 2019

We unravel how refugee families destined for Australia ended up stuck in an immigrant detention camp more than a thousand miles away on the tiny island nation of Nauru. And why, after years of confinement, kids are succumbing to a surreal mental illness spreading through the camp like a contagion. This episode is a collaboration with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s show “Background Briefing” and reporter Olivia Rousset.

Courtesy of Sonali Dev

Romance novels made up almost a quarter of the U.S. fiction market in 2016, second only to general fiction. Some people may think of the genre solely as Harlequin-published books with a man who looks like Fabio on the cover. But romance fiction encompasses more than this stereotype. 

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our music discovery station, WUNC Music.

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