Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Photo of some of the cast members.
Areon Mobasher Photography

A Louisiana high school became the subject of national debate and controversy in 2007 after six black students were accused of attempted murder after a high school fight.

Press photo for Zoocru.
Courtesy of Zoocru

Durham’s Art of Cool music festival is the brainchild of jazz lover Cicely Mitchell and trumpeter Al Strong.

Headshot of Rhiannon Giddens
photo by Ebru Yildiz

Grammy Award-winning artist Rhiannon Giddens is a North Carolina gem. Though she splits her time between the U.S and Ireland, her commitment to the music, culture, and stories of the South is still the driving force behind her work.

A full-body mask that is white and includes the names of black men victimized by racist violence.
Courtesy of Fahamu Pecou

  

Artist Fahamu Pecou has been wrestling with stereotypes of black masculinity for his entire life. No matter how many degrees he earned or what job he had, he had the sense that he was only seen as a black body.

For its final installment in the Slingshot Scenes series from the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area (we call it "The Triangle"), WUNC Music invited Kym Register to write about the local LGBTQ+ scene. Register is a musician and owner of the Durham club The Pinhook, a focal point for the community and home to new and established artists.


ZenSoFly

Rapsody posed for a headshot.
(Photo by Brian Ach/Invision/AP)

Billy Porter made Emmy history Sunday when he became the first openly gay black man to win lead actor in a drama category for his role in the FX series “Pose.”

Whoopi Goldberg: The Unqualified Hostess

Sep 24, 2019

When you think about Whoopi Goldberg, you likely think of her as an actor, entertainer and television host. But what you probably don’t know about Whoopi is that she is a passionate hostess who takes the art of setting the table and entertaining very serious. Her new book, Whoopi Goldberg: The Unqualified Hostess, is full of creative tablescapes and suggestions for making people feel welcome in your home.

Whoopi Goldberg: The Unqualified Hostess

Sep 24, 2019

When you think about Whoopi Goldberg, you likely think of her as an actor, entertainer and television host. But what you probably don’t know about Whoopi is that she is a passionate hostess who takes the art of setting the table and entertaining very serious. Her new book, Whoopi Goldberg: The Unqualified Hostess, is full of creative tablescapes and suggestions for making people feel welcome in your home.

Pregnancy, Cigarettes, and Desert Islands

Sep 23, 2019
Al Letson
Liz Mackinder

Mike Birbiglia: A free vacation leads to a breakthrough and a breakup. 

Jenifer Hixson: Two women meet by chance on a dark street and share secrets. 

Al Letson: A father admits he was not quite ready for a second child. 

Jeffery Rudell: A live calf shows up for Thanksgiving dinner. 

Newton posed in a red beret and blue blouse on the balcony of The Carolina Theatre.
Beth Mann / Durham Magazine

As a kid Rebecca Newton loved performing for her family. Around the piano, she discovered her skill for harmonizing and found that showcasing her musical talents was a way to keep the peace in a tumultuous and sometimes violent household.

Grant Holub-Moorman / WUNC

Artists Alice Gerrard, Allison de Groot and Tatiana Hargreaves each has a rich musical career in her own right. But when they come together as a trio, the musicians open up space to exchange songs and stories across generations.

Chatham County Line
Patrick Shanahan / Yep Roc Music Group

We've teamed up with Come Hear NC on a podcast series that explores North Carolina music one song at a time. This time, Pinecone Director William Lewis tell us why he loves Chatham County Line's 'Living In Raleigh Now.'

The International Bluegrass Music Association Festival takes place next weekend in...Raleigh.

Passing the Torch

Sep 20, 2019

On family farms, in restaurants, and in food writing, what happens when one generation passes the work to the next? Best-selling author and restaurant critic Ruth Reichl talks with Soleil Ho, the new restaurant critic for the San Francisco Chronicle, about stepping into big shoes. Peach farmers Mas and Nikiko Masumoto talk about what it is like for them to pass the farm from father to daughter. Bricia Lopez tells us about taking over the family restaurant when her parents returned to Mexico.

With an influx of new music, hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot decide it's time for a review roundup. They share their opinions on records by Tool, Lana Del Rey, Common and more. They also pay tribute to the late Cars' frontman Ric Ocasek and solo artist Daniel Johnston.

Steven Spielberg’s work ranges from the gripping war drama “Saving Private Ryan” to the animated series “Pinky and the Brain.” He scared us with “Poltergeist,” and fascinated us with “Jurassic Park.” Spielberg made us laugh at “The Goonies” and cry in “The Color Purple.” Whether writing, producing or directing, Steven Spielberg is one of Hollywood’s elite filmmakers whose name is worth its weight in Oscar gold. This month we want to know about your favorite Spielberg movie? 

 

An improvised scene from 'Midnight Cowboy'
United Artists

People constantly quote and misquote cinema — sometimes without ever having seen the referenced film. Think about lines like “You had me at hello”; “Hasta la vista, baby”; or “Play it again, Sam.” Sometimes the words many of us repeat are never spoken in the movie, and other times they are phrases that actors made up on the spot. Whether it’s from Monty Python, Whoopi Goldberg, or a Spielberg flick, movie quotes are the way we map our cultural common ground.

There's a reason the mixtape (or CD, or playlist, or .zip file) holds such sentimental power. A good mix can feel like a letter from a best friend, with each track carefully aligned with one's personal tastes. But the truly excellent ones are like being handed a key ring to the cosmos, with each track unlocking a door to a new world to explore. North Carolina may not take up that much space on a map, but it's home to an abundance of musical worlds. North Carolina Public Radio has spent the past year talking to artists about their favorite songs that say something about our home state.

America’s Drug War, Revealed

Sep 17, 2019

This episode comes to us from Marketplace’s wealth and poverty team and their show, The Uncertain Hour.

In 1989, President George H. W. Bush did his first televised broadcast, speaking directly to the nation about an issue he believed was the gravest domestic threat to America: drugs. Specifically, crack cocaine. In the speech, Bush pulled a baggie of crack out of his desk as a prop, saying it had been seized from Lafayette Park, right across the street from the White House. 

Randall Munroe / Riverhead Books

XKCD is a stick-figure webcomic. While the drawings might be simple, the ideas explore universal concepts like romance, sarcasm, math, and language. The exchanges between stick figures can capture the imagination and attention span of a child while wading into complex astrophysics and existential dilemmas. 

Tommy Coyote / Courtesy of Miriam Tolbert

How do local artists make it big these days? In the age of recommendation algorithms and music streaming, can a radio DJ spin an indie artist into fame? Miriam Tolbert is trying to do just that by slowly turning the attention of a commercial station back to the local scene. 

The three women of band Honey Magpie play their respective instruments.
Conor Makepeace / Courtesy of Honey Magpie

Singer-songwriter Rachael Hurwitz struggled to make it as a musician in New York City. She eventually decided to head south in search of a more encouraging culture.

The Kruger Brothers
krugerbrothers.com

We've teamed up with Come Hear NC on a podcast series that explores North Carolina music one song at a time. This time, musician Joe Newberry tells us why he is inspired by the Switzerland born and NC based bluegrass trio Kruger Brothers. "Carolina In The Fall" tells the story of their journey here.

Scuttling Science

Sep 12, 2019

Today’s show looks at the Trump administration’s pattern of pushing expert scientists out of policy discussions. \

Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot are always on the lookout for buried treasures - newly released music that is flying underneath the critical and commercial radar. They're back this week with some exciting new songs. Jim and Greg also talk with a member of a somewhat buried treasure act from the past, Peter Lewis of Moby Grape. They discuss ways the 1960s San Francisco group turned convention on its head and some of the bad luck that befell the band.

Confrontations

Sep 11, 2019
Arn Chorn-Pond
Jason Falchook

After finally accepting his sexuality, Pádraig Ó'Tuama uses language to heal rather than harm. Tricia Rose Burt attempts to break the strictures of her Southern upbringing. Arn Chorn-Pond uses his musical gift to survive the Khmer Rouge.

Melissa comes home to an empty refrigerator save for eggs, scallions and some sad sage and ends up showing us an amazing recipe and technique for Olive Oil Fried Eggs with Scallions, Sage and Turkish Red Pepper.

Book cover depicting illustrated weapons and technological devices in a roq
Routledge

For almost 15 years, fans of The Real Housewives franchise have reveled in the explosive verbal and physical brawls that take place on screen. Pair that with the constant barrage of political rants on Twitter and viral violent YouTube videos, and one might wonder how much our hearts and minds are being altered by the images and language around us.   

Photo of House of Dues at the Triad Stage in downtown Greensboro
Dana Terry/WUNC

For almost a decade House of Dues has been part of the Triad music scene. But they got their start playing at a Mardi Gras party. Led by guitarist and vocalist David Bolton, the group counts BB King, The Nevilles and Herbie Hancock as the inspiration behind their blues, funk, and R&B blend. House of Dues plays at Fishers Grille in Greensboro on Tuesday, Sept. 10 at 7 p.m.

Invigorating Israeli Cooking

Sep 10, 2019

Adeena Sussman is one of those food writers who immerses themselves into a subject. To say she is enamored of Middle Eastern food, flavors and culture may be an understatement. An American who visited Israel regularly throughout her life, Adeena decided to make Tel Aviv her home in 2015. She has a great gift for teaching others how to embrace the flavors of Israeli cuisine by using border-crossing kitchen staples like tahini, sumac, silan, harissa and za’ater. Her newest cookbook, Sababa: Fresh Sunny Flavors from My Israeli Kitchen, focus solely on Israeli food.

You either DIY or You Die

Sep 9, 2019
Rose DeConto / WUNC

Starting a band is hard. I would know because I’ve been in four at this point. It’s hard enough to get people to show up for rehearsal – and it’s even harder when you’re under 18. People sometimes don’t take you seriously. They’ll assume you’re not good at playing, or they’ll take advantage of you.

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