Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Manifest music festival's poster: A person with a heart shaped face holds a baby and a piece of cake that's on fire.
Ria Aubry Taylor

No one ever asks Henbrain to turn up the bass. The band features two electric basses chugging alongside one another, which defines its low-frequency acid rock sound.

An image of Jonathan Wilson
John Vettese

We've teamed up with Come Hear NC on a podcast series that explores North Carolina music one song at a time. On this episode, musician Kamara Thomas talks about the Jonathan Wilson song 'Can We Really Party Today?' She says it's a song with dual meanings.

Jonathan Wilson plays The Arts Center in Carrboro on Friday, October 25th.

Movie poster that reads 'Indiana Jones: Raiders of the Lost Ark.'
Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

Steven Spielberg was named the highest-grossing filmmaker in U.S. history last year.

Though originally panned by many critics, the Rolling Stones' 1972 album Exile on Main St. is now considered a masterpiece. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot serve up a classic album dissection for the deeply influential recording.

Rissi Palmer / Baldilocks LLC

Fans of Southern Soul have been yearning for new music from country crossover artist Rissi Palmer. Slated for release on Oct. 22, 2019, “Revival” will be her first album since “The Back Porch Sessions” EP in 2015. 

An image of Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee
Terry Cryer

We've teamed up with Come Hear NC on a podcast series that explores North Carolina music one song at a time. This time, Dom Flemons talks about a recording of the song 'Cindy' that Pete Seeger made with North Carolinians Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee.

Stick around after the episode to hear Dom Flemon's 'Sonoran Church Two-Step.'

Songs We Love By Bands We Dislike

Oct 10, 2019

Have you ever listened to a song and loved it, only to find out it’s by an artist you can’t stand? Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot will explore the concept of great songs by horrible artists and share a few of their favorites. Plus they'll review Ghosteen from Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds and pay tribute to drummer Ginger Baker and The Muffs' Kim Shattuck.

a headshot of Ann Patchett at her bookstore, Parnassus Books in Nashville
Heidi Ross/Harper Collins

Everyone has particular childhood memories that stand out and shape the story of who they are. But how reliable are these memories, and when should we let them go? These are some of the questions plaguing siblings Danny and Maeve Conroy, the two central characters in author Ann Patchett’s new novel, “The Dutch House” (Harper/2019).

Losing ground

Oct 9, 2019

This episode originally was broadcast July 1, 2017.

Picture an American farmer. Chances are, the farmer you’re imagining is white – more than 9 out of 10 American farmers today are. But historically, African Americans played a huge role in agriculture. The nation’s economy was built largely on black farm labor: in bondage for hundreds of years, followed by a century of sharecropping and tenant farming.

The Call

Oct 9, 2019
Cheech Marin
Braden Moran

Susan Fee gets a surprise when she calls her daughter. A series of missed calls gets scientist Moran Cerf in hot water. Nancy Mahl gets a call from her mom on 9/11. Cheech Marin finds his calling after dodging the draft.

Promotional photo showing four women confronting an alien in high water.
Courtesy of Women's Theatre Festival

Imagine a world in which almost every town is flooded and most people are living in temporary shelters. It is unclear what has caused the flooding or if waters will recede any time soon, and government officials are not being transparent about what is going on. This is the plot of the new play from Women's Theatre Festival, called "Waters Rise."

Book cover
Courtesy of Negar Mottahedeh

In the aftermath of the overthrow of Iran's last monarch Mohammad Reza Shah, women in that country marked International Women’s Day for the first time in 50 years. The event held deep symbolic importance for the women who had been instrumental in that overthrow. But what was conceptualized as a celebration soon became a protest against a mandatory veiling decree.

Gray playing his guitar in front of a mic.
Anita Rao / WUNC

Barry Gray’s debut release is the culmination of a family man’s slow-burning reflections.

Diana Henry on Oven Cooking

Oct 8, 2019

As we move into fall, our pull to the oven grows stronger. Cooking in the oven is not only soul-warming, but it happens to be a real time-saver. Food writer Diana Henry has spent nearly two decades traveling across the globe for culinary inspiration. However, inspiration for the recipes for her latest book, From the Oven to the Tablebegan much closer to home -- with her oven.

Ross and Ruiz-Lopez headshot.
Courtesy of Violet Bell

When North Carolina duo Violet Bell started recording their debut album, they planned to feature band members Lizzy Ross and Omar Ruiz-Lopez plus a drummer. But once the tape started rolling, Ross and Ruiz-Lopez realized the music warranted a bigger sound.

An image of Sonic Youth
Amanda DeCadenet

We've teamed up with Come Hear NC on a podcast series that explores North Carolina music one song at a time. This week, Merge Records recording artist H.C. McEntire talks about the Sonic Youth song 'Chapel Hill.' It's a song that paints a picture of what the indie rock scene was like in the early '90s and was a lot of people's first impression of the town.

Favorite Fall Cookbooks

Oct 4, 2019

This week we’re all about the new fall cookbook releases and we talk to some of our favorite authors who wrote them: Danny Mena (Made in Mexico), Evan Funke (American Sfoglino); Joanne Chang (Pastry Love

Catch a Killer with your DNA

Oct 3, 2019

Ever since police used genetic genealogy to crack the famous Golden State Killer case, this new crime fighting tool has solved dozens of murders and rapes that had gone cold for decades. Our show looks at the promise and perils of this powerful tool that combines DNA science with genealogy.

We start with the murder of a young couple in Canada more than 30 years ago. This was the first case after the Golden State Killer to employ genetic genealogy, and the person who identified the suspect walks us through how she did it.

Sound Opinions: Family Bands

Oct 3, 2019

<!--td {border: 1px solid #ccc;}br {mso-data-placement:same-cell;}-->The family that plays together, stays together, right? If you‘ve ever traveled in a van with your mother, father, sister or brother, you know it's not that easy. From Sister Sledge to The Cowsills, hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot share some of the great Family Bands that made it work. Plus, Jim and Greg review Ode To Joy, the latest album from alt-rock band Wilco.

A Divorcee, A Freedom Rider, and New Mother

Oct 3, 2019
Sala Udin
Renee Rosensteel

Cindy Chupack has to get an official divorce from a rabbi before she can remarry.
  Sala Udin, a Freedom Rider, is captured by the Mississippi Highway Patrol and almost loses his life.
  Rebecca Nesson's difficult second pregnancy has consequences for her marriage.  

Book cover showing a young Earl Scruggs with playing a banjo.
Courtesy of University of Illinois Press

Two minutes and 40 seconds of lightning-fast picking propelled bluegrass music into the mainstream. "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" written by Earl Scruggs and first recorded by Lester Flatt, Earl Scruggs and the Foggy Mountain Boys in 1949 helped bluegrass move from a subgenre of country to a popular and recognizable sound for American audiences.

Okra is a seed-to-stem plant, meaning that every part of the organism is edible.
Peter Taylor

Writing off okra as a slimy pod is a great injustice, according to Chris Smith. The garden writer and seed saver is an okra aficionado who asserts that while the vegetable may have a unique texture, it is a surprisingly versatile piece of produce.

Enter to win Made in Mexico cookbook by Danny Mena

Oct 1, 2019

October 2019 Giveaway

DNA Doesn't Lie

Sep 30, 2019
Trina Robinson
Jason Falchook

Meg Ferrill struggles with her fears of becoming a parent while shopping for sperm.  Anaïs Bordier makes a surprising connection via social media. Trina Robinson, while researching online, discovers a shocking family history.

Kelley leaning against a counter in a TV repair shop.
Courtesy of Irene Kelley

Irene Kelley has been a force on Nashville’s Music Row for decades. She spent 20 years writing or co-writing hit songs for country artists like Ricky Skaggs and Loretta Lynn. But at the same time she was quietly working on her career as a performer.

Photo of the five members of the band posed with their instruments outside.
Courtesy of Carolina Blue

Bluegrass band Carolina Blue formed out of necessity.

An image of Trentemoller
Sofie Nørregaard

Danish electronic artist Anders Trentemøller is back with his fifth studio album 'Obverse.' The music is dark and ambient and this time features vocal contributions from Slowdive's Rachel Goswell and Warpaint's Jenny Lee Lindberg, among others.

Elizabeth Cotten
Diana Davies

We've teamed up with Come Hear NC on a podcast series that explores North Carolina music one song at a time. On this episode, folk musician Alice Gerrard talks about Elizabeth Cotten's 'Freight Train.'

On Saturday night at Red Hat Amphitheater in Raleigh, an all-star group of musicians pays tribute to the music Alice Gerrard made with Hazel Dickens. Most of the seats are free.

Commander-in-Tweet

Sep 26, 2019

When President Trump tweets, the news cycle listens. Whether it’s the trade war, immigration police, vague threats of war or racist language, what the commander-in-tweet has to say often becomes a top story. But is it driving us to distraction? On today’s show, we’ll dig into the details of one story that may have been obscured by furor over Trump tweets: U.S. involvement in the war in Yemen. Then, we'll explore the contours of a conspiracy theory that's developed around the President.

Fugazi Classic Album Dissection

Sep 26, 2019

Washington D.C. post-punk band Fugazi reshaped the definition of punk in America. Their 1990 debut album, Repeater, connected with a generation and eventually sold more than a million copies. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot talk with founding member Ian MacKaye about the writing and recording of the album and its impact. Plus we review Sturgill Simpson's new album, Sound and Fury, and learn what song got a member of the band Dehd "Hooked on Sonics."

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