Keri Brown / WFDD

Corralling COVID-19 In Meatpacking And Poultry Processing Plants

Across the country, more than 250 employees at meatpacking plants have died of the coronavirus. Congress has opened an investigation into the outbreaks as the companies try to stem the COVID infections.

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Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Rollout Begins In U.S. As COVID-19 Cases Tick Up

Johnson & Johnson has begun shipping nearly 4 million doses of its newly authorized COVID-19 vaccine across the U.S., officials said Monday, and is expected to further scale up supply in the coming weeks and months. "We think literally within about the next 24 to 48 hours, Americans should start receiving shots in arms," Alex Gorsky, Johnson & Johnson's CEO and chairman of the board, told NBC's Today . Both the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

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Uncovering Black Asheville

Jan 30, 2009

In the late 1800s, North Carolina's favorite mountain retreat was home to a progressive African-American community that founded the Young Men's Institute. It remains the country's oldest free-standing African-American community center.

Joe Thompson At 90

Dec 9, 2008
David Persoff

Legendary North Carolina fiddler Joe Thompson turns 90-years-old today. He is widely recognized as being the last living link to a time when African American String Bands played for square dances nearly every weekend around here. Thompson's toured the world with his music and is still playing, but now mostly, at home with friends and neighbors.

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Holy Smoke

Nov 12, 2008

Most traditions have plenty of people, history and folklore to back them up. Carolina barbecue is no different. A new book called, "Holy Smoke: The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue" explores the Tar Heel tradition - past and present.

Jazz artist Branford Marsalis
courtesy of the artist

Saxophone master and Durham resident Branford Marsalis has never shied away from a challenge when it comes to tackling music.  The jazz legend's latest undertaking incorporates his sax into the classical music traditions of South America in a show called "Marsalis Brasilianos: Villa Lobos, Milhaud and the New Worlds of Brazilian Modernism."  

Smithfield Settlement

Oct 31, 2008

Smithfield Foods and the United Food and Commercial Workers settled a federal racketeering lawsuit this week. Now the nearly five thousand workers at the plant in Tar Heel will have another chance to vote on union representation.

Love And Gasoline

Sep 19, 2008

Love may make the world go around, but sometimes it may need a little gasoline to keep it going. North Carolina Public Radio asked listeners how the year's dramatic rise in gasoline prices has affected their personal lives.

Meet Jan Boxill

Jul 21, 2008

Jan Boxill grew up playing football with her 11 siblings at a time when girls weren’t even allowed to march in the band because it was too strenuous. She went on to help found her college basketball team, and later became a college coach. For more than 20 years Jan served as the Public Address Announcer for Women’s Basketball at UNC and was even an announcer at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.

Alvin and Omelia Garner
Leoneda Inge

On this day - June 23, 40 years ago, the first interracial couple in Orange County was married. Alvin and Omelia Garner got their marriage license a year after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down state laws forbidding such unions. To mark this year’s anniversary, the Garners decided to celebrate in style and have the wedding they never had.

Photographing the Ninth Ward

Jun 4, 2008
Church of Living God2,  2007 photograph by John Rosenthal
John Rosenthal

John Rosenthal is renowned for his black and white photographs of New York City in the 1970s. The photos archived parts of the city that were vanishing and eventually disappeared: a dusty model of a ship in a bottle in the window of a social club in Little Italy, for example, or seltzer bottles stacked in wood crates.

NC Voices: Growth & Transportation

Feb 29, 2008

As Wake county grows, more and more major transit arteries are slowing to a crawl. Some say the answer is more roads. Others say it’s fewer cars. And Triangle commuters are literally stuck in the middle.

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Laura Pellicer / WUNC

WUNC Commits To Anti-Racism

Black lives matter. WUNC believes this because it is true, and truth fuels what we do at North Carolina Public Radio. WUNC does not believe that saying Black lives matter is a political statement, or supportive of any single organization, or that it conflicts with our journalistic mission. In fact, saying and believing that Black lives matter enhances that journalistic mission, by acknowledging the various levels of systemic racism with which our social, political and corporate establishments...

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The 2020 Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the outbreak and response – across the globe and in North Carolina.

Embodied Radio Show

A group of people standing on dark concrete with their arms extended upwards
Debora Cartagena//Pixnio

Fitness Culture, Deconstructed: No, You Don’t Have To ‘Burn It To Earn It’

How comfortable do you feel in gyms, fitness studios and exercise classes? With COVID-19 in our midst, we all may feel a little iffy about spending time indoors with people breathing hard — but what about even before the pandemic? In and outside of gyms, we get inundated with messaging about what we should look like and how physically fit we should be. This fitness culture tells us that unless we exercise a certain way and achieve a certain ideal — of thinness, whiteness and heteronormative gender presentation — we’re doing it wrong.

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Tested Podcast

Tested is a hard look at how North Carolina and its neighbors face the day's challenges. Hosted by journalists Dave DeWitt and Leoneda Inge.

Sex and relationships are intimate – and sometimes intimidating to talk about. Host Anita Rao guides us on an exploration of our brains and our bodies that touches down in taboo territory.

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Education Stories

Kristin Kanipe helps her three children paint a poster, while homeschooling on her back porch. Kristin is in a wheelchair and she and her children wear winter coats and masks.
Liz Schlemmer

Before the pandemic, Kristin Kanipe never expected she'd end up homeschooling her three kids.

"I remember talking to a friend and specifically saying, 'God would have to smack me in the head and make it "you have to homeschool" for me to ever homeschool.' I had no desire to homeschool. I actually did not want to homeschool," Kanipe said.

Darrell Allison, president of Parents for Educational Freedom in North Carolina.
Parents for Educational Freedom in North Carolina

The UNC System Board of Governors has chosen one of its own former members, Darrell Allison, as the next chancellor of Fayetteville State University.

In this Oct. 26, 2021 file photo, Carolyn Griffin begins the first day of in person classes at Davis Drive Elementary in Cary, NC.
Kate Medley / for WUNC

A bill that would require every school district in North Carolina to provide in-person learning to students who want it has passed the General Assembly and is headed to the governor's desk.

Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

 

Updated at 8:30 p.m. on Feb. 11, 2021.

The chancellor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has clarified his role — and what he told university faculty — concerning the $2.5 million settlement involving the Silent Sam statue.

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Reporting on the lives of American military personnel and veterans.