NC Legislative Building
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

While You Were Sleeping: North Carolina Legislators Restrict Access To Public Records

While North Carolinians were sleeping early Friday morning, the General Assembly swiftly passed a bill that would shield death-investigation records from the public.

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Thierry Raimbault/Flickr / https://bit.ly/2YH4TU6

Coronavirus Live Updates: Week of June 29

Supreme Court Hands Abortion-Rights Advocates A Victory In Louisiana Case

Updated at 5:35 p.m. A sharply divided U.S. Supreme Court stood by its most recent abortion-rights precedent Monday, delivering a major defeat to abortion opponents who had hoped for a reversal of fortunes at the court with the addition of two new Trump-appointed justices. By a 5-4 vote, the court struck down a Louisiana law that was virtually identical to a Texas law it invalidated just four years ago. Chief Justice John Roberts cast the fifth and decisive vote. Four years ago, the chief...

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NC Voices: Traditions Converge

Oct 9, 2007

Standard-issue Western health care isn’t delivering what some people want or need. They're looking for more than just another pill or procedure and piecing together medical care from several different traditions. Or, they’re bringing traditions with them from other countries. Melinda Penkava has this story for our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care."

When Lindsay Foster Thomas landed her job as a producer for WUNC’s midday program "The State of Things," she moved from New York City to Durham with a long "to-do" list.   After finding a place to live, mapping her route to work, and checking out the best places to eat, she focused on choosing her doctors.  As part of our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," she explains her choices.

More information:

North Carolina Institute of Medicine report

In the early nineteen sixties, two young doctors from Tufts University Medical School near Boston spent a summer treating the Mississippi freedom riders. The struggle for civil rights opened the doctors’ eyes to how much minorities and the poor lacked access to health care. So they established two community health centers - one in rural Mississippi, the other in inner-city Boston. Today, those clinics- and about a thousand more across the country- provide a safety net of care to everyone who comes through the door, regardless of their ability to pay. There are one-hundred-and-six community health centers in North Carolina. Jessica Jones spent a few days at one: the Siler City Community Health Center, about an hour west of Raleigh. She reports for our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care."

If you don’t have health insurance, there are places you can go to get health care. Community clinics, local health departments, state funded health centers … they often provide low-cost or even free care. But they mostly focus on the basics. What if you have a heart problem and need to see a cardiologist? Or you need an orthopedic surgeon or an endocrinologist? These kinds of specialists are expensive, and there is typically no low-cost option for people who don’t have insurance. Ten years ago, doctors in Buncombe County wanted to do something about that. And the program they created, Project Access, is now a model for other programs nationwide. Dave DeWitt reports for our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care."

NC Voices: Health Literacy

Oct 5, 2007

There are a lot of ways to get health information… from the doctor, the Internet, books, patient handouts, friends and family. But how do you know what information is best for you? Wading through and understanding it, contradictions and all, is a function of health literacy - the ability to understand and follow the doctor’s advice. Without that, even patients with good medical insurance can lose out.  Rose Hoban reports for our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care."

NC Voices: Skipping Health Insurance

Oct 5, 2007

The United States is the only major industrialized nation that does not provide healthcare for everyone.  47 million Americans have no insurance to help pay for trips to the doctor, medicine, or emergency surgery.  People can purchase health insurance on their own, but it's usually expensive, and a lot of people who are uninsured say they can't afford it.  So they hope they don't get sick; seek charity or low cost care when they do; and even make big life decisions based on their insurance needs.  Karen Michel reports for our series "North Carolina Voices:  Diagnosing Health Care."

NC Voices: Diagnosing Health Care

Oct 4, 2007

Ask just about anyone in the health care debate what the biggest problem is, and you’ll hear the same two words – the uninsured. One out of six North Carolinians has no health insurance- that’s more than 1.4 million people. And they’re putting a strain on the entire healthcare system. Some states are taking bold steps to reform the insurance system. But North Carolina is not among them. We asked our State Capitol Reporter Laura Leslie to find out why for our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care."

Many workers at the Smithfield hog processing plant in Tar Heel North Carolina continue to speak-out about what they call "bad" work conditions. But yesterday instead of just speaking-out – hundreds of workers walked out.

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NC Reckons With Racial Injustice

NC Reckons With Racial Injustice

What you need to know about the protests and policies across the state.

Tested Podcast

Tested is a look at how North Carolina is dealing with Covid-19, and what we North Carolinians are learning about ourselves in the face of a global crisis.

The State of Things

The transgender rights flag with a healthcare emblem.
GLAAD

Transgender Health Outcomes Improve When Providers Take These Four Steps


Stigma, confusion and outright discrimination shape the health care experiences of many transgender and gender non-conforming people. In a national survey of transgender people in the U.S., 29% said health care providers had refused to see them because of their actual or perceived gender identity.

On this edition of the Embodied series , host Anita Rao learns about the ways gender-affirming doctor’s visits, home life and classrooms can improve health outcomes for transgender and gender-nonconforming people.

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The 2020 Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the outbreak and response – across the globe and in North Carolina.

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Education Stories

Collins sits at a table under a George Floyd mural that reads "George Floyd Rest in Power."
Courtesy of Armando Collins

For Armondo Collins, growing up in a predominantly-black neighborhood in St. Paul, Minnesota meant several things. It meant that he had to pass through majority white, wealthy communities whenever he wanted candy from the corner store. And it meant that he got stopped by the police a lot. 

Chris Seward / The News & Observer via AP, File

A longtime conservative donor and former lawmaker was picked Thursday to the state public higher education system’s Board of Governors by the Republican-controlled Senate.

A group of women sit around a table. A sign behind them reads "Think Babies."
North Carolina Early Education Coalition

Even before COVID-19 began to impact childcare center operations across the state, half of North Carolina was a childcare desert — a geographic area where three or more working-parent families vy for every available childcare slot. 

Andrew Harnik, File / AP Photo

Landlords in North Carolina can begin filing evictions this week, after a statewide moratorium on eviction proceedings lifted Monday. That means a wave of North Carolina tenants could soon face eviction hearings in court.

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Reporting on the lives of American military personnel and veterans.