Gerry Broome, File / AP Photo

Poor People's Campaign to hold bus tours of poverty areas

The Poor People's Campaign will hold bus tours of poverty-stricken areas in more than 20 states to call attention to "what the national emergencies really are" in the wake of President Donald Trump's emergency declaration over the U.S.-Mexico border, a leader of the campaign says.

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With No Host Directing Traffic, 'Green Book' Drives Away With Best Picture

It turns out the Oscars telecast doesn't need a host. Sure, the headline coming out of Sunday's Oscars is that Green Book and Bohemian Rhapsody were big winners — Green Book won three including best picture, and Bohemian Rhapsody won four including best actor for Rami Malek. (That despite the fact that both films had decidedly mixed reviews.) That Bohemian Rhapsody 's credited director, Bryan Singer — fired part of the way through filming — has been accused of a wide range of sexual...

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NC Voices: Growth & Transportation

Feb 28, 2008

As a part of our ongoing coverage of Growth and Sustainability -- this week on Morning Edition we're featuring a North Carolina Voices series on Transportation. One form of transit stands out for it’s energy efficiency, health benefits and fun – that’s people-powered transportation. But in the Triangle, that can be tough. It’s a place that’s been built primarily for cars -- and many bikers says it’s just too dangerous to consider getting to work on two wheels or feet.

A newly proposed mass transit plan for the Triangle could link Chapel Hill to North Raleigh by bus and rail as early as 2020. It’s the suggestion of a 29 member regional organization called the Special Transit Advisory Group. As it stands right now, the proposal would greatly expand local and regional bus service, and add some form of rail transit later on.

Raleigh is growing. That statement is not news to anyone who's tried to get across town at rush hour. More people often does mean more traffic and longer commutes. As a part of our on-going coverage of growth and sustainability -- today we begin a North Carolina Voices series that looks at how the Triangle area will meet the transportation needs of a rapidly growing population. We begin with Eric Hodge's conversation with Mitchell Silver, the Director of Planning for the City of Raleigh.

The fight between Smithfield and the United Food and Commercial Workers over unionizing the Tar Heel hog processing plant has entered a new phase. A federal judge in Virginia has allowed a lawsuit filed by Smithfield to go forward.

The suit accuses the UFCW of a coordinated public smear campaign.  It uses the RICO statutes that were created to fight organized crime. The lawsuit is the latest step in a confrontation that has slowly been moving out of the plant itself and into the kitchens and living rooms of consumers.

NC Voices: Health Of Elders

Oct 16, 2007

People are living longer now than ever before in human history. By the year 2030, more than one-in-five people in the United States will be over the age of 65. The dream is to stay healthy into a ripe old age and die peacefully in your sleep. But the reality is likely to be quite different. Many people go through a long physical and mental decline before they die. As we wrap up our series, "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," Rose Hoban takes a look at whether the health care system is ready for the coming flood of frail seniors.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 5

Oct 16, 2007

As part of our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care" we’ve been reporting on the remarkable rise of Type 2 diabetes. That rise is due mostly to obesity; Emily Hanford traveled to two schools in eastern North Carolina to try to find out why it's such a problem -- and what's being done about it.

NC Voices: Gene Testing

Oct 15, 2007

Since experts mapped the human genome, the continuous flow of new information has affected decisions people are making about their health. As part of our series, "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," producer Susan Davis considers what people learn from genetic testing and if it’s always helpful. When Susan’s father died of Alzheimer’s disease in 1992 experts were not sure if there was a genetic link to the disease. But now they’re sure. And there’s a test she could take to find out if she has it.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 4

Oct 15, 2007

Type-2 diabetes may be the plague of this century. Just 20 years ago, about 30 million people in the world had the disease. Today, it’s more than five times that many. It’s a frightening prospect for health, and the health care system. Here in North Carolina, diabetes is already a direct or contributing cause in one out of every five hospitalizations. That’s billions of dollars of every year. Experts say health care providers need more effective ways to treat diabetics so they don’t end up in the hospital. A group of clinics in eastern North Carolina is trying to do it with a new model for treating chronic disease.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 3

Oct 12, 2007

This week we're focusing on health care and the rise of diabetes in northeastern North Carolina. Yesterday we met Miranda Cofield, a 50 year old woman who recently lost her health insurance. She's African American, and she's poor. These factors put her at high risk of developing complications from diabetes. Statistically, Sterling Hamilton does not face the same risks.

NC Voices: Greener Hospitals

Oct 11, 2007

This week we’re examining the health care system and asking whether it actually promotes good health. Today, we look at health care facilities themselves. From toxic chemicals and medical waste, to round-the-clock energy and water use, the way hospitals are built and maintained can have serious effects on the patients inside and on the environment beyond. So as the population ages and hospital construction booms, the health care industry is examining the central creed of medicine "to do no harm" and applying it the environment too.

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photo of Bill Ferris and Marcie Cohen Ferris
photo courtesy of Bill Ferris

And The Grammy Goes To: North Carolina’s Bill Ferris

William Ferris is known around North Carolina as a folklorist — a man whose passion is to chronicle the stories, music and culture of the American South. His love for documenting his communities began as a boy. At 12 years old, he was given a camera and began to take photographs around his neighborhood in Warren County, Mississippi. There are tales of young Ferris taking a reel-to-reel recorder to record hymns at church.

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Education Stories

Bennett College’s accreditation was restored Friday afternoon by a federal court in Atlanta, Georgia.

The school had lost its accreditation earlier Friday when the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools denied the college’s appeal to maintain their accreditation.

Naomi Prioleau / WUNC

Updated at 2:30 p.m.

Bennett College has lost its accreditation after the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools denied the school's appeal.

Leigh Bordley, LEAP's executive director, admires an airplane a preschool student built out of toys.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

It's 10 o'clock on a Tuesday morning at the LEAP Academy's Nuestra Escuelita, in Durham. That means it's music time. A circle of three- and four-year-olds dance and sing songs.

"Don Alfredo, baila," they sing, their little arms and legs moving in half-coordinated gestures. "Baila, baila, baila!"

Non-tenure-track faculty at Elon University are getting a chance to vote on joining a union. The National Labor Relations Board has ordered an election that begins Tuesday.

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