Bringing The World Home To You

© 2023 WUNC North Carolina Public Radio
120 Friday Center Dr
Chapel Hill, NC 27517
919.445.9150 | 800.962.9862
91.5 Chapel Hill 88.9 Manteo 90.9 Rocky Mount 91.1 Welcome 91.9 Fayetteville 90.5 Buxton 94.1 Lumberton 99.9 Southern Pines
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

The Site Of The Berlin Airlift Now Serves As Refugee Shelter And Big Open Park

Thousands of Berliners come to Tempelhof on warm summer evenings, but there's always room for more.
Martin Kaste
/
NPR
Thousands of Berliners come to Tempelhof on warm summer evenings, but there's always room for more.

Berlin's Tempelhof Field used to be a massive airport. It's famous as the site of the Berlin airlift — the effort in 1948-49 to keep West Berlin fed and supplied during a Soviet blockade. But the airport closed in 2008.

Now, 10 years later, Tempelhof Field is a huge park, and a home for refugees.

Here are some scenes, and sounds, from a recent visit.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Riding to the end of one of Tempelhof's former runways is a serious workout.
Martin Kaste / NPR
/
NPR
Riding to the end of one of Tempelhof's former runways is a serious workout.

Modular homes for refugees, erected recently in one corner of Tempelhof Field.
Martin Kaste / NPR
/
NPR
Modular homes for refugees, erected recently in one corner of Tempelhof Field.
Tempelhof was the site of early experiments in aviation. It was expanded in the Nazi era, and was the site of a forced labor camp. After the war, it was both a U.S. air base and a civilian airport.
Martin Kaste / NPR
/
NPR
Tempelhof was the site of early experiments in aviation. It was expanded in the Nazi era, and was the site of a forced labor camp. After the war, it was both a U.S. air base and a civilian airport.

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He covers law enforcement and privacy. He has been focused on police and use of force since before the 2014 protests in Ferguson, and that coverage led to the creation of NPR's Criminal Justice Collaborative.
More Stories