Warren County

National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a new memorial to honor thousands of people killed in racist lynchings,
Brynn Anderson / AP

It’s hard to count the exact number of African Americans who were lynched by white mobs during the years following slavery. Numbers show most of these brutal, deadly acts occurred in the South, between the 1870s and the 1950s.

Warren County, Warrenton, Parks and Recreation, African Americans
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The season for cookouts, games and outdoor relaxation is in full swing at local parks across the state. It’s especially the right time for fun in the town of Warrenton, near the Virginia state line, which recently opened its first municipal park. It sits in an all-black community that has had few options for recreation over the years.

of Dr. Francis Aniekwensi visits with patient Calvin Elps. Aniekwensi is currently one of two part-time physicians in Warren County. He welcomes the news of a new doctor in town.
Christine Nguyen, The Daily Dispatch / For WUNC

Last week, the Warren County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to lease the empty building of the former Warren Community Health Clinic to a local physician planning to start a new practice.

Dr. Francis Aniekwensi is a partner at Beckford Medical Center. In Warren County, a primary care desert, Aniekwensi is working to improve health conditions for the more than 10,000 patients who frequent the three Beckford clinics.
Christine Nguyen, The Daily Dispatch / For WUNC

It’s early afternoon on a recent Tuesday and Dr. Francis Aniekwensi is preparing to see his twentieth patient of the day.

Mary Somerville co-founded the Warren Community Health Clinic and was its executive director until the clinic closed.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The former Warren Community Health Clinic in Warrenton sits empty and quiet, across the parking lot from the county health department. Until last year, the clinic served low-income patients who often were unable to pay for medical services and didn’t have Medicare or Medicaid.

Former congresswoman Eva Clayton chats with other speakers during the North Carolina Campuses Against Hunger conference at Elon.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ncstate/

 Note: Today's program is a rebroadcast of a program originally aired on March 25, 2013.

Warren County Free Clinic Sign
Leoneda Inge

North Carolina has one of the best networks of free clinics in the country.  Support from funders like the Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation has helped take care of some of the state’s neediest patients; those who don’t qualify for Medicare of Medicaid.  Warren County – northeast of Raleigh – is home to one of the busiest free clinics in North Carolina.  But funding cuts have resulted in less service at a crucial time in the nation’s health care fight.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ncstate/

When Eva Clayton was sworn into the U.S. Congress in 1992, she became the first Congresswoman from the state of North Carolina. But before that election, Clayton had a long history of community organizing and politicking. During her extensive career, she has always maintained a devotion to the rights and struggles of working class people.

Community members, activists and friends will meet near Warrenton - northeast of Raleigh - this weekend to mark a historic milestone in the nation’s environmental justice movement.

The Environmental Justice movement was born in Warren County.  The mostly black community of Afton stood up – and laid down in the streets – to try to stop the state from digging a P-C-B contaminated landfill where they lived – as seen on WBTV in 1982.

Voice One:  I don’t want this stuff throwed in my water!