Opioid Crisis

Fayetteville Police Department Captain Lars Paul shows a naloxone injectable kit and a naloxone nose spray Fayetteville police use to reverse opioid overdose.
Raul Rubiera / For WUNC

Last year, public attention turned to the opioid crisis for months. Policymakers implemented plans to curb overdoses and providers across the health care spectrum vowed to do their part to stem the crisis.

Kristin D. stands in the Bright Spaces room at the Healing Transitions women's campus in Raleigh. Women in the program live on campus for 12 - 18 months and are slowly given greater responsibility, freedom, and trust as they progress through the program.
Madeline Gray / For WUNC

Kristin walked confidently through the halls of Healing Transitions as she gave a tour on a recent morning.

Carla Hollis, center in black and white dress, CEO of Triangle Springs cuts the ribbon.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

Veteran Duke basketball fans will remember the name Marty Clark. He played for the Blue Devils in the early 1990s, including on the back-to-back championship teams of 1991 and 1992.

But after college, things turned for Clark.

Photo of prescription bottle and pils
Eric Norriss / Flickr Creative Commons

A non-profit advocacy group says children whose parents have a history of substance abuse are entering foster care at a higher rate. 

UNC at Greensboro

Guilford County and The University of North Carolina at Greensboro have created a community-engaged response to the opioid problem.

Photo of prescription bottle and pils
Eric Norriss / Flickr Creative Commons

Jeffrey Halbstein-Harris had already beat addiction twice by the time he was in his 30s. But a doctor assured him that the opioids he was prescribing for Halbstein-Harris’s diabetic neuropathy were both effective and non-habit forming. Nevertheless, Halbstein-Harris became dependent and went through a painful withdrawal process.