Latina

Creative Commons / pxhere

Kitchens in America’s top-rated restaurants have long been a boys club in which men hold the positions of power and women have to play by their rules, even when they cross the line. However, the reaction to allegations against top chefs and media darlings like Mario Batali show that the tides may be turning as the #MeToo movement enters the kitchen.

Image of Host Frank Stasio, Avett Brothers' Cellist Joe Kwon, and SOT Producer Anita Rao
Charlie SHelton / WUNC

The year is coming to an end, and “The State of Things” staff is taking a moment to reflect on some of the year’s most memorable conversations. Producer Anita Rao’s favorite segments include a conversation commemorating Yusor Abu-Salha, one of the three Muslim students shot and killed in Chapel Hill in February.

A new memoir by UNC's Kenan Visiting Writer Daisy Hernández
A Cup of Water Under My Bed Book Cover

This was originally broadcasted on 10/21/2014

Daisy Hernández grew up between cultures as a first-generation American child of a working-class Colombian mother and Cuban father. 

Her family hoped that she’d “become white,” but she struggled to meet their demands while forming an identity of her own. Her new memoir, A Cup of Water Under My Bed (Beacon Press/2014), traces her journey, weaving stories of religion and family with details about a new world away from home, where she developed a new political consciousness, came out as bisexual, and worked as a feminist journalist. 

Cover of the book A Cup of Water Under My Bed
Cover Image of the book A Cup of Water Under My Bed

  

Daisy Hernández grew up between cultures as a first-generation American child of a working-class Colombian mother and Cuban father.