Gun Violence

The “Cure Violence” violence-prevention program may be coming to Greensboro, as city and Guilford County officials research ways to curb rising crime rates in the area.

High school and college students eager to respond to questions about gun safety issues from lawmakers.
Ben McKeown / WUNC

The Institute of Politics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill held a "reverse" town hall on gun violence Sunday to give influential lawmakers the opportunity to ask young people what they thought about the issue.

East Chapel Hill High students Sahmoi Stout and Sydney McLean lead fellow students in a march for gun control as part of the National School Walkout, holding the banner that says "Enough."
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

About 200 students from several Chapel Hill area schools marched together up a hill, and nearly five miles across their town behind an orange banner that said "Enough."

A student from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Fla., attends a news conference about gun violence, Friday, March 23, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington, ahead of the Saturday March For Our Lives.
Jacquelyn Martin / AP

This Saturday, students across North Carolina will join their peers from around the nation, yet again, to call for safer schools.

Zainab Antepli, a junior at Chapel Hill High School, calls for tougher gun laws in front of a large crowd at Pullen Memorial Baptist Church in Raleigh.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Since the mass school shooting in Columbine, America has seemed almost powerless against rogue gunmen attacking defenseless suburban schools. After the tragic killings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012, many declared that if America did not make changes after Newtown it never would. 

Students at East Chapel Hill High walk out of their class on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 as part of a nationwide call for tighter gun control measures.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Updated at 4:27 p.m.

Students hoisted "Stand United" signs. They chanted "''Hey, hey, ho, ho - the NRA has got to go" outside the White House. Others read the names of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High victims aloud in a somber tribute.

Memorial and calls for gun control cover a fence outside of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland, Florida.
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

Many North Carolina students will join fellow students across the country in walking out of classes Wednesday. The day marks one month after the mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida. Area schools are taking a variety of approaches to the expected protests.

moms protesting for gun legislation in Los Angeles
Richard Vogel / AP

A group plans to demand common sense gun legislation at the Raleigh office of U.S. Senator Thom Tillis on Tuesday morning. The rally comes less than a week after a mass shooting at a high school in Florida that killed 17 people.

Supporters and members of Bull City United lead a "Week of Peace" candlelight vigil at the Cornwallis housing community on Wednesday, January 10, 2018.
Christine Nguyen / For WUNC

At the recent "Week of Peace" candlelight vigil, Daryl Quick read the names of victims of Durham’ 2017 gun violence.

Amy Pittman visits the grave of her son, Christian, in Durham, N.C., on Friday, Feb. 10, 2017. Pittman was charged in 2014 with manslaughter after 9-year-old Christian was accidentally shot and killed by his older brother.
Gerry Broome / AP

Amy Pittman learned on her first day in jail to bottle up her grief. As soon as she arrived, guards took her shoelaces so she wouldn't try to hang herself. Cry too much or scream too loud and she feared they would come back to take everything she had left — her clothes, a sheet, a plastic spork.

Photo of Carmelo Anthony, Chris Paul, Dwyane Wade and LeBron James speaking at the ESPY Awards.
Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

In the past two weeks, violence by and against police has dominated headlines and rattled the country. Protests from movements like #BlackLivesMatter continue while celebrities use speeches and social media as a platform to make their voices heard.

Meanwhile, the ESPN documentary series "O.J.: Made In America" looks at race relations since the 1960s through the life of former athlete O.J. Simpson.

Image of shadowed figure with hood
Pixabay

 

Across the country, more than a million black men are “missing” from everyday life, according to a recent New York Times article. There are more than 70,000 missing black men in North Carolina.

 

The Durham police department.
Ildar Sagdejev / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Department of Justice has confirmed racial discrepancies when it comes to gun-related violence in Durham. 

 The report released yesterday shows that from 2009 to 2012, the homicide rate for young black men in Durham was eight times higher than the national average.

Family members of some of the victims of the 2012 mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., have filed a lawsuit against the manufacturer, distributor and seller of the rifle used by the gunman to kill 26 people.

Pastor James Gailliard
wordtab.net / Word Tabernacle Church

    

Hundreds of community members gathered at the Word Tabernacle Church in Rocky Mount to discuss solutions for community violence after four teenagers were shot behind the church last month. Many at the meeting said an increase in gun availability on the streets of Rocky Mount contributes to the problem.  

Durham Police Department

Durham police officers are crediting an initiative started six years ago for reducing crime in one of the city's most violent neighborhoods. 

"Operation Bull's Eye" targeted a two-square-mile area with high rates of crime and "shots fired" calls.  Officers used enforcement and community-building programs to bring shooting incidents down by more than half and overall violent crime down by nearly 40 percent. 

Durham's deputy chief Larry Smith says the lower numbers can't be attributed to enforcement alone.  

Gun
Megathon Charlie via Flickr, Creative Commons

Mothers across North Carolina are marching and speaking out at events tomorrow to raise awareness of how gun violence affects families. Joslyn Simms, who lost her son Rayburn to gun violence eight years ago this month, will be speaking at tomorrow's rally in Durham.

mothersincharge.org

When Dorothy Johnson-Speight’s son Khaaliq was killed in 2001, she thought her life was over. He wasn’t the first child she lost – her 3-year-old daughter had died almost 15 years to the day before
Khaaliq’s murder -- but he was the first child lost to violence, and his death shook her.

Recent high-profile shootings in Colorado, Wisconsin and Texas are spurring public conversations about gun control, but is tougher regulations on our right to keep and bear arms an effective method for curtailing gun deaths?